Workers found the 121-year-old "time capsule" while removing the Jefferson Davis monument in Virginia.

Workers found the 121-year-old “time capsule” while removing the Jefferson Davis monument in Virginia.

Bricklayers discovered what appears to be a 121-year-old time capsule Wednesday as they dismantled the remains of a pedestal that once stood a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

The Jefferson Davis Monument on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia was torn down by protesters in 2020.

Crews have been working to dismantle the pedestals of the Confederate statues, which were dismantled last month.

According to the Richmond Times-Dispatch, the time capsule found this week is likely the third to be discovered on the Confederate plinth on Monument Avenue.

In December, a time capsule was found inside the former base of the Robert E. Lee statue while crews were removing it.

It is also reported that under the statue of Stonewall Jackson is a time capsule that can be found in the coming days, the newspaper said.

Michael Spence, construction manager for Team Henry Enterprises LLC, measures a time capsule that was found under where a statue of Jefferson Davis once stood on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia.

Michael Spence, construction manager for Team Henry Enterprises LLC, measures a time capsule that was found under where a statue of Jefferson Davis once stood on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia.

The capstone covered the capsule, located where the statue of Jefferson Davis once stood on Monument Avenue.

The capstone covered the capsule, located where the statue of Jefferson Davis once stood on Monument Avenue.

A statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis rises from Monument Avenue on September 15, 2017 in Richmond, Virginia.  It was demolished by protesters in 2020.

A statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis rises from Monument Avenue on September 15, 2017 in Richmond, Virginia. It was demolished by protesters in 2020.

Crews have been working to remove the pedestals of Confederate statues (including a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, pictured in 2017) that have been removed over the past month.

Crews have been working to remove the pedestals of Confederate statues (including a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, pictured in 2017) that have been removed over the past month.

A crane lowers part of a column from the Jefferson Davis Monument onto a truck bed on Monument Avenue in Richmond Wednesday.

A crane lowers part of a column from the Jefferson Davis Monument onto a truck bed on Monument Avenue in Richmond Wednesday.

Part of a pillar of the Jefferson Davis monument sits on the back of a truck being prepared for transport in Richmond.

Part of a pillar of the Jefferson Davis monument sits on the back of a truck being prepared for transport in Richmond.

The copper box found Wednesday and its contents will be donated to the Black History Museum, which will also receive all of the Confederate statues, Richmond Mayor LeVar Stoney, a spokesman for the mayor, told the paper.

Dennis Duarte, a Connecticut Summit Masonry foreman, has spent the past two weeks in Richmond tearing down Confederate plinths.

Duarte told the newspaper that when he cut the box out of the concrete, the lid bulged like a bubble. He estimated the box weighed around 20-25 pounds.

According to newspaper records, the box contains relics from the Civil War, Masonic traditions, and Richmond history, including: Carlton McCarthy’s Guide to Richmond, Virginia, and the Battlefields; $100 Confederate note; the Daily Dispatch and the Richmond Times, and “a polished marble shard from the front porch of the Jefferson Davis Mansion, now known as the White House of the Confederacy.”

“These things testify to the Lost Cause mythology and how it has grown in the 30 years since the Civil War,” said Christina K. Vida, curator of the Valentine Museum.

She added that the materials reflect the views of wealthy white people from the South, and the views of black Virginians were not taken into account.

In December, historic preservation experts in the Virginia capital opened a time capsule that was found in the remains of a pedestal that once stood a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and found books, coins, ammunition, documents and dozens of other artifacts.

The picture shows a man mourning the death of Abraham Lincoln at his grave, as depicted in the April 25, 1965 issue of Harper's Weekly.

The picture shows a man mourning the death of Abraham Lincoln at his grave, as depicted in the April 25, 1965 issue of Harper’s Weekly.

Officials initially searched for the capsule after removing the controversial statue (top) of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in September, but were unable to find it at the time.  The real capsule was discovered after the pedestal was removed.

Officials initially searched for the capsule after removing the controversial statue (top) of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in September, but were unable to find it at the time. The real capsule was discovered after the pedestal was removed.

Another artifact is on display from a box opened in December that appears to be a real time capsule from 1887.

Another artifact is on display from a box opened in December that appears to be a real time capsule from 1887.

Records held by the Library of Virginia suggest that dozens of Richmond residents, organizations, and businesses contributed about 60 items to the capsule, including Confederate memorabilia.

Records held by the Library of Virginia suggest that dozens of Richmond residents, organizations, and businesses contributed about 60 items to the capsule, including Confederate memorabilia.

The restorers had to carefully separate the waterlogged coins from the paper relics while processing the materials.

The restorers had to carefully separate the waterlogged coins from the paper relics while processing the materials.

The box appears to be a real 1887 time capsule filled with Confederate knick-knacks, after another container found earlier was found to be a gimmick, apparently left behind by the monument’s builders.

However, the real-time capsule did not contain a rare photograph of President Abraham Lincoln in an open coffin, as historians had hoped, but instead an image of the assassinated president’s grave.

Records held by the Library of Virginia suggest that dozens of Richmond residents, organizations, and businesses contributed about 60 items to the capsule, including Confederate memorabilia.

Lead conservator for the Virginia Department of Historical Resources, Kate Ridgway, said the dimensions and material of the brass box are consistent with historical data.

A pile of rubble is all that remains after the removal of the pedestal that once stood a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, Thursday, December 23, 2021, in Richmond.

A pile of rubble is all that remains after the removal of the pedestal that once stood a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, Thursday, December 23, 2021, in Richmond.

Crews completing the dismantling of the giant pedestal that once stood a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Richmond found what turned out to be a second time capsule.

Crews completing the dismantling of the giant pedestal that once stood a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Richmond found what turned out to be a second time capsule.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam tweeted photos of the crate removed from its location in December and said restorers were looking into the artifact.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam tweeted photos of the crate removed from its location in December and said restorers were looking into the artifact.

The second box (above) was discovered a week after the first box, taken off its pedestal, turned out to be a clear

The second box (above) was discovered a week after the first box, taken off its pedestal, turned out to be a clear “vanity project” inserted by a mason.

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