Why do sharks attack people?

Why do sharks attack people?

Why do sharks attack PEOPLE? An amazing study has shown why the Great Whites were preying on humans just a few months before the horrific attack in Sydney.

  • Study shows sharks bite surfers and swimmers as a result of ‘misidentification’
  • A Macquarie University study found that surfers are like shark prey.
  • White, bull and tiger sharks most often bite humans.
  • Finds show that surfers and swimmers are like seals on the surface of the ocean

The study showed why some sharks are more likely to attack humans, and this may come down to a case of “misidentification.”

Research from Macquarie University in Sydney has shown that great white sharks attack humans because of their resemblance to seals and sea lions.

According to animal sensory system researcher Dr. Laura Ryan, the greatest number of bites to humans come from great white, bull and tiger sharks.

A new study from Australia's Macquarie University has shown that some sharks bite humans in case of

A new study from Australia’s Macquarie University has shown that some sharks bite humans in case of “misidentification” (great white shark stock photo)

“We found that surfers, swimmers and pinnipeds (seals and sea lions) on the ocean surface would look the same to a great white shark looking up because these sharks cannot see fine details or colors,” said Dr. Ryan. in a statement.

In particular, people swimming or paddling on a surfboard are at the highest risk of being bitten, especially by juvenile white sharks, which are more prone to attack.

Dr. Ryan is an avid surfer herself and says the study will help scientists better understand why some sharks bite people.

The findings showed that a young white shark confuses surfers and swimmers with seals or sea lions causing shark bites (Australian sea lions pictured, stock photo)

The findings showed that a young white shark confuses surfers and swimmers with seals or sea lions causing shark bites (Australian sea lions pictured, stock photo)

A team of researchers from Sydney's Macquarie University concluded that in the eyes of many young great white sharks, surfers and swimmers, they look like seals and sea lions in the ocean.

A team of researchers from Sydney’s Macquarie University concluded that in the eyes of many young great white sharks, surfers and swimmers, they look like seals and sea lions in the ocean.

The latest research has prompted scientists at the Neuroscience Lab to develop non-invasive vision-based devices to protect swimmers and surfers from sharks in the water.

The researchers compared underwater footage of rectangular floats, swimming seals and people swimming on different sized surfboards in the Taronga Zoo Aquarium.

“We attached a GoPro camera to a scooter and set it to typical cruising speed for predatory sharks,” Dr. Ryan said.

Existing data from shark neuroscience has been used to apply filters to vision and create simulation programs to model how a juvenile white shark would interpret the movements and shapes of various objects.

The results confirmed that people who paddle surfboards bear a striking resemblance to seals and sea lions in the eyes of young white sharks, supporting the mistaken identity theory.

Since most species are completely colorblind, the main visual cues for sharks are silhouettes floating on the surface of the ocean.

The results confirmed that people who paddle surfboards bear a striking resemblance to seals and sea lions in the eyes of young white sharks, supporting the mistaken identity theory.

The results confirmed that people who paddle surfboards bear a striking resemblance to seals and sea lions in the eyes of young white sharks, supporting the mistaken identity theory.

The great white, tiger, and bull sharks are three species that many people fear.

The great white, tiger, and bull sharks are three species that many people fear.

White sharks see very well, and young white sharks pose a great threat to people due to their poor eyesight.

“Sharks use a range of sensory cues to distinguish between different objects and focus on their food, and these vary in sensitivity across shark species,” Dr. Ryan said.

Fatal shark attacks are rare. According to the Australian Institute of Marine Science, there are about 10 shark-related deaths worldwide each year.

This compares to about 150 deaths worldwide per year caused by falling coconuts.

But when they do occur, they can lead to the use of deadly shark control measures, detrimental to population numbers, scientists warn.

“Shark bites in humans are rare, but common enough to cause serious public concern, which usually leads to measures to reduce their frequency,” the authors say in their article published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

“Bites also have negative effects on sharks, as they often result in the adoption or continued use of lethal shark mitigation measures, including the deployment of gillnets and tympanic lines to reduce shark populations.”

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