Weapons Ukraine uses to deter Russian army invasion

Weapons Ukraine uses to deter Russian army invasion

British missiles, anti-tank missiles from the US and Estonia, Turkish drones are just some of the weapons Ukrainian forces are using to fiercely defend their homeland.

Troops are desperate to repel Putin’s military onslaught, the National Guard is on the defensive all over Kiev, and residents are being urged to brew Molotov cocktails in a battle for control of the capital.

Ukrainian soldiers used shoulder-mounted guided missiles yesterday to destroy Russian tanks and helicopters after a number of Western countries sent thousands of “self-defense” weapons.

The UK has sent Ukraine 2,000 next-generation light anti-tank weapons (NLAW), and the US last month sent a plane carrying 300 Javelin missiles worth about $50 million to Kiev.

Other countries, including Turkey, the Czech Republic and Estonia, have also followed suit, but countries such as Hungary, Germany and Belgium have ruled out supplying weapons to counter Putin.

Despite the support, Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov called for more, stating: “We need the same number of Stingers. [anti-aircraft] and anti-tank weapons if possible.

“To ensure a reliable purchase of equipment, you can deliver it to Poland. From there we will ferry them across the ground and quickly saturate our defenses.

MailOnline looks at what military aid was sent to Ukraine, and what western country it came from, from advanced drones to artillery first developed in the 1950s.

MailOnline looks at what military aid was sent to Ukraine, and what western country it came from, from advanced drones to artillery first developed in the 1950s.

MailOnline looks at what military aid was sent to Ukraine, and what western country it came from, from advanced drones to artillery first developed in the 1950s.

Javelin anti-tank guided missiles

A Ukrainian soldier aims a Javelin grenade launcher from the roof of an armored personnel carrier during a military parade in Kiev in 2018.  The weapon can also be carried in combat within the troops and fired over the shoulder.

A Ukrainian soldier aims a Javelin grenade launcher from the roof of an armored personnel carrier during a military parade in Kiev in 2018. The weapon can also be carried in combat within the troops and fired over the shoulder.

Countries that sent them: UK, Estonia and USA

How much did Ukraine get? 300 from USA, unknown from others

Cost: £130,000 ($175,000) each for the rocket alone.

How they work: Javelins use infrared systems to lock onto a target, meaning troops don’t have to keep aiming after pulling the trigger.

Once the rocket is launched, it is ejected from the tube with a small charge so that it can be launched in a confined space before the main rockets ignite.

The missile then takes off to a height of 490 feet and then falls on the target from above – the so-called “curved trajectory shot”.

This is especially deadly against tanks because their top armor is the thinnest, although javelins can also be used to blow up buildings.

Javelin missiles use a

Javelin missiles use a “curve” shot – approaching their target from above – which makes them especially deadly against tanks that have less armor on top. They also have two warheads that are designed to overcome the “reactive” armor that Russia uses.

Facts: The FGM-148 Javelin is a US-made missile that is primarily designed to destroy tanks, using a combination of “curve attack” – that is, it falls on its targets from above – and twin high-explosive fragmentation warheads to hit them. outside.

Javelins were developed in the 1990s and have been in service since 1996, encountering Russian-designed T-72 tanks during the Second Iraq War, where they proved particularly effective.

Russia still uses T-72 tanks – dozens of T-72Bs are currently deployed near Ukraine – and although they have undergone several upgrades since Saddam’s time, they are still considered vulnerable to missiles.

Where were they used in Ukraine? In Glukhov in the east of the country, destroy 15 Russian T-72 tanks

Light anti-tank weapons of a new generation

Lightweight: Britain sends 2,000 next-generation light anti-tank weapons to Ukraine (pictured during exercises in Lviv)

Lightweight: Britain sends 2,000 next-generation light anti-tank weapons to Ukraine (pictured during exercises in Lviv)

Country that sent them: United Kingdom

How much did Ukraine get? At least 2000

Cost: £35,000 ($48,000) per single shot unit.

How they work: Launched on the shoulder and can fire from tight spaces.

The “cold start” system ejects the rocket with compressed gas before it fires the rocket motor, accelerating the weapon to 440 miles per hour (200 meters per second).

The missile then uses the inertial navigation system to fly to the target vehicle.

Facts: The Next Generation Light Anti-Tank Weapon (NLAW) began as a joint British-Swedish project in 2002 to replace Cold War weapons designed to provide infantry squads with portable protection against short-range tanks.

The next-generation light anti-tank weapon (pictured) began as a joint British-Swedish project in 2002 to replace Cold War-era weapons intended to provide infantry squads with portable protection against short-range tanks.

The next-generation light anti-tank weapon (pictured) began as a joint British-Swedish project in 2002 to replace Cold War-era weapons intended to provide infantry squads with portable protection against short-range tanks.

The 3.2-foot-long (1 meter) weapon with a 20-year shelf life was built from components made by BAE, Saab, Thales, and the American company Raytheon.

It weighs only 27.5 pounds and can launch a single 150 millimeter diameter rocket to an effective range of 65 to 2,000 feet (20 to 600 meters) or up to 1,300 feet (400 meters) for moving targets.

The weapon is much lighter than US-made Javelin missiles.

Last month, British military instructors, drawn from a newly formed Ranger Regiment, were sent to Ukraine to instruct its troops on how to use anti-tank weapons.

Where were they used in Ukraine? Kharkov, in the northeast of the country, destroy four Russian tanks and three attack helicopters

stinger rocket

The Stinger made history in 1980s Afghanistan when a man used the weapon to shoot down a Soviet Hind attack helicopter.  A Ukrainian soldier helps move 92 Stinger missiles in Kiev earlier this month.

The Stinger made history in 1980s Afghanistan when a man used the weapon to shoot down a Soviet Hind attack helicopter. A Ukrainian soldier helps move 92 Stinger missiles in Kiev earlier this month.

Countries that sent them: Latvia and Lithuania

How much did Ukraine get? Unknown

Cost: £97,000 ($130,000) per item

How they work: To operate a weapon, a soldier inserts a block of coolant into the handguard, which releases a jet of argon into the vehicle.

It also fires a blast of chemical energy that powers the indicators and missile.

Fact: The Stinger made history in 1980s Afghanistan when a man used the weapon to shoot down a Soviet Hind attack helicopter.

This step changed the course of the war and led to the collapse of the USSR.

This is a man-portable air defense system (MANPADS) that uses infrared homing technology to search for and destroy flying targets.

The Stinger, which sits on the operator’s shoulder, was first developed in the US in 1981 and is currently in use in more than 18 countries.

The missile is 5.0 feet (1.52 m) long and 2.8 inches (70 mm) in diameter with a 10 cm fin.

And the rocket weighs about 22 pounds (10.1 kg), and the rocket with the launcher weighs approximately 34 pounds (15.2 kg).

Where were they used in Ukraine?

Shoot down several Russian planes, although it is not clear where exactly. The Ukrainian military said five Russian planes and one helicopter were shot down yesterday in Lugansk in the east.

Drones Bayraktar TB2

Turkey first developed the TB2 prototype (pictured) in 2007 before the drones entered final production in 2012.

Turkey first developed the TB2 prototype (pictured) in 2007 before the drones entered final production in 2012.

Country that sent them: Turkey

How much did Ukraine get? Several parties, but the official figure is unknown

Cost: Approximately £3.7 million (US$5 million) each.

How they work: Capable of flying 24,000 feet (7,300 meters) for 24 hours and carrying a payload of 330 pounds (150 kg), the TB2 is heavily armed and a source of Turkish national pride.

It is capable of air strikes against tanks and bunkers at a maximum altitude of five miles to avoid enemy machine guns.

The drone can also move even if it loses the GPS signal.

Fact: Turkey first developed the TB2 prototype in 2007 before the drones entered final production in 2012.

Previously, they were used by Azerbaijan against Armenian separatists; Turkish security forces, including their allies in Libya and Syria; and also sold to Ukraine and Qatar.

The drones are 21 feet long, have a top speed of 80 miles per hour, and have a range of 93 miles.

Where were they used in Ukraine? Dont clear

152 mm artillery ammunition

Artillery pieces of 152 mm or 155 mm caliber can be found in most current and recent conflicts.  They are designed to fire support for armored vehicles and infantry, firing ammunition at greater distances than small arms and light weapons.

Artillery pieces of 152 mm or 155 mm caliber can be found in most current and recent conflicts. They are designed to fire support for armored vehicles and infantry, firing ammunition at greater distances than small arms and light weapons.

Country that sent them: Czech Republic

How much did Ukraine get? Unknown

Cost: Around £746 ($1,000) per round.

How they work: Artillery guns are designed to provide fire support to armored troops and infantry, firing ammunition at a greater distance than small arms and light weapons.

Reference: 152mm or 155mm artillery pieces can be found in most current and recent conflicts.

The two calibers are broadly similar in capability; both are capable of delivering an approximately 88 lb (40 kg) projectile to a range of 10-24 miles (17-40 km). 152 mm and 155 mm guns are often referred to as “heavy artillery”.

One of the most common towed 152 mm artillery pieces is the Soviet M1955 (D-20) howitzer cannon, first discovered in the 1950s.

Where were they used in Ukraine? Dont clear

Weapons Ukraine uses to deter Russian army invasion

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