VIDEO: Penguin jumps into a passing boat to escape a hungry seal

VIDEO: Penguin jumps into a passing boat to escape a hungry seal

We got a penguin! The moment when a penguin takes a boat to the nearest iceberg after jumping on board to escape a hungry seal.

  • Adélie penguins are the most common penguin species in Antarctica.
  • Vladimir Seliverstov, 50, from Russia, filmed a penguin jumping into his boat.
  • The penguin escaped from the leopard seal shortly before he jumped into the boat.

This is the moment when a penguin on a tourist boat returns to the iceberg after escaping from a seal attack.

Guide and photographer Vladimir Seliverstov, 50, from Russia, photographed an Adélie penguin aboard a boat during an expedition to Antarctica.

The penguin escaped from the leopard seal shortly before he jumped into the boat.

Raising the car, the penguin stayed there until he returned to safety with his friends on a nearby iceberg.

The Adélie penguin jumped off the ice shelf and headed for the nearest boat.

The Adélie penguin jumped off the ice shelf and headed for the nearest boat.

The penguin pictured jumped onto the prow of the boat to avoid the attention of a stalking seal.

The penguin pictured jumped onto the prow of the boat to avoid the attention of a stalking seal.

Vladimir Seliverstov, 50, from Russia, captured the moment an Adélie penguin rides his boat during an expedition to Antarctica.

Vladimir Seliverstov, 50, from Russia, captured the moment an Adélie penguin rides his boat during an expedition to Antarctica.

Seliverstov said: “I have been photographing wildlife for over twenty years.

“I’ve never experienced something like this before, but some of my friends have.

“Penguins are quite comfortable with people, but not with everyone.

“My friends and family loved the video.”

Researchers say Adélie penguins – the most common penguin species in Antarctica – are happier when there is less sea ice.

A new study suggests that animals enjoy more favorable feeding conditions in unusual ice-free conditions.

In the absence of ice, flightless birds can travel more by swimming than on foot, and it is easier for them to forage.

Yuki Watanabe of the National Institute of Polar Research said: “For penguins, swimming is four times faster than walking.

“They can be smooth in the water, but are pretty slow on land.”

Adélie penguins - the most common penguin species in Antarctica - are happier when there is less sea ice, researchers say

Adélie penguins – the most common penguin species in Antarctica – are happier when there is less sea ice, researchers say

In recent decades, Antarctica has seen a steady increase in sea ice extent, while the Arctic has seen a marked decline, according to the researchers.

But this is not expected to last as the climate changes, as Antarctica is also projected to shrink sea ice.

Polar biologists have long known that Adélie penguin populations tend to increase in years of thin sea ice, and in years with the most sea ice growth, they suffer massive breeding failures.

To find out why, researchers at the Japan National Institute of Polar Research electronically tagged 175 penguins using GPS devices, accelerometers and video cameras over four seasons with varying sea ice conditions.

This allowed them to track penguins during their travels, classify walking, swimming and resting behaviors, and estimate the amount of prey caught during dives.

The researchers found that penguins may have expended on average 15-33% less energy per trip compared to ice-covered seasons, channeling the saved energy into growth and reproduction.

The leopard seal can weigh up to 840 pounds and live in the wild for 12 to 15 years.

They are deadly predators and feed on warm-blooded prey such as other seals and birds.

They may target penguins after flightless birds jump from an ice shelf into frigid Antarctic waters.

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