Van Gogh "ear"?  The Courtauld Gallery sells hospital souvenirs

Van Gogh “ear”? The Courtauld Gallery sells hospital souvenirs

Van Gogh’s “Ear Eraser”? London gallery, hosting a major exhibition of the artist’s work, sells souvenirs based on anatomy

  • Products chosen by the Courtauld Gallery include the £6 “ear”, an ear-shaped elastic that Van Gogh ripped open in a psychotic rage.
  • The range is dedicated to a Dutch master who had severe mental health issues that culminated in his suicide.
  • It also features a £5 bar of soap marketed as perfect for the “tortured artist who loves fluffy bubbles”.
  • There is also a £16 Emotional First Aid Kit which is described as “a box of wise emergency advice for 20 key psychological situations”.

Given the art world’s obsession with political correctness, it’s fair to say that the mementos chosen to accompany the new exhibition of Vincent van Gogh’s paintings came as something of a surprise.

The products selected by the Courtauld Gallery, which currently showcases work including the artist’s famous self-portrait with a bandage on a self-inflicted wound, include the £6 Eraser, an elastic band in the shape of an ear cut off by Van Gogh. psychotic rage.

Dedicated to the Dutch craftsman who suffered serious mental health issues that culminated in his suicide, the range also includes a £5 bar of soap billed as ideal for the ‘tortured artist who loves fluffy bubbles’ and an emotional first aid kit priced at £16, which is described as “a box of wise emergency tips for 20 key psychological situations”.

The pieces selected by the Courtauld Gallery include the £6

The pieces selected by the Courtauld Gallery include the £6 “ear” – an ear-shaped elastic that Vincent van Gogh tore apart in a psychotic rage.

Dedicated to a Dutch craftsman who had serious mental health issues that culminated in his suicide, the range also includes a £5 (above) bar of soap, billed as ideal for

Dedicated to a Dutch craftsman who had serious mental health issues that culminated in his suicide, the range also includes a £5 (above) bar of soap, billed as ideal for “the suffering artist who loves fluffy bubbles” , and emotional first aid. The set, priced at £16, is described as “a box of wise emergency advice for 20 key psychological situations”.

But some were clearly unimpressed—and even offended—by the attempt at a joke.

Charles Thomson, co-founder of the Stuckist art group, said: “Suicide is no joke and mental illness is no joke. It’s superficial, disgusting and tactless.”

Art critic David Lee, editor of The Jackdaw magazine, said: “I can’t believe this isn’t some tawdry joke in a pub after work by someone in the marketing department.”

“After all, this is the Courtauld Institute, supposedly the center of art history in Britain, if not in Western Europe.

“Are they ready to sell false leg pencils at the Frida Kahlo exhibition, for example?”

Mexican artist Kahlo had her leg amputated due to gangrene.

Works currently on display at the Courtauld Gallery include the artist's famous self-portrait with a bandage over his self-inflicted wound (pictured).

Works currently on display at the Courtauld Gallery include the artist’s famous self-portrait with a bandage over his self-inflicted wound (pictured).

A heavy drinker, Van Gogh, whose most famous works include Sunflowers and The Bedroom, is believed to have suffered from either bipolar or temporal lobe epilepsy, a disorder of the nervous system.

In 1888, while living in France, he cut off his left ear after an argument with fellow artist Gauguin.

He then spent over a year in the Saint-Paul asylum in Saint-Remy, and in 1890, at the age of only 37, he shot himself and died two days later.

Criticizing the Courtauld Gallery, located in Somerset House in central London, Mr Thomson added: “Must visitors seriously appreciate Van Gogh one minute, and face stupid jokes about him the next? What’s next? Van Gogh’s suicide gun?

The Courtauld Gallery declined to comment.

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