U.S. athletics star Sha'Curry Richardson criticizes double standards after Russian figure skater allowed the competition

U.S. athletics star Sha’Curry Richardson criticizes double standards after Russian figure skater allowed the competition

American track and field athlete Shakarri Richardshon has criticized the International Olympic Committee for double standards after it allowed 15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva to compete despite an ongoing investigation into her failed doping test.

the 21-year-old said on twitter on monday that “no black athlete” has been able to compete while under doping investigation and that the only difference between “her situation and mine” is the color of their skin.

Can we get a clear answer about the difference between her and my situation? she wrote on Twitter on Monday. “My mother is dead and I can’t run, and I’m also in the top three. The only difference I see is that I’m a black young lady.

“It’s all about the skin,” she continued. ‘[By the way] THC is definitely not a performance enhancer!!!!’

Richardson was disqualified from the 2020 Tokyo Games for testing positive for marijuana after her test returned at olympic trials. She claimed to have taken the drug after learning from a reporter that her biological mother had died.

Valieva tested positive for the banned cardiac drug trimetazidine in December at her national championship. Oddly enough, anti-doping authorities did not report results until last Tuesday, after a day earlier she became a star when Russia won gold in the team discipline.

On Monday, a panel of the Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that she would be allowed to compete because she was a protected person under the age of 16.

Trimetazidine is a cardiac drug that can boost blood flow efficiency and increase endurance, and some Russian athletes abuse it to boost performance. The drug is banned by WADA both during and out of competition.

21-year-old American track and field athlete Shakarri Richardson criticized the decision of the Court of Arbitration for Sport to allow 15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva to continue participating in the Olympic Games after a positive test result for trimetazidine (TMZ).

21-year-old American track and field athlete Shakarri Richardson criticized the decision of the Court of Arbitration for Sport to allow 15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva to continue participating in the Olympic Games after a positive test result for trimetazidine (TMZ).

A member of Kamila Valieva's team said that the Russian is too talented to need drugs

Valieva tested positive at TMZ on Feb. 8 after winning gold in the team event. Her test was done on December 25.

U.S. athletics star Sha'Curry Richardson criticizes double standards after Russian figure skater allowed the competition U.S. athletics star Sha'Curry Richardson criticizes double standards after Russian figure skater allowed the competition U.S. athletics star Sha'Curry Richardson criticizes double standards after Russian figure skater allowed the competition U.S. athletics star Sha'Curry Richardson criticizes double standards after Russian figure skater allowed the competition Richardson claimed that the only difference between "her situation and mine" is that the athletics star is a "dark-skinned young lady." She also criticized the decision to ban her from taking drugs that do not increase her performance, and at the same time allow Valieva to participate in competitions after a positive test result for a drug that really works.

Richardson claimed that the only difference between “her situation and mine” is that the athletics star is a “dark-skinned young lady.” She also criticized the decision to ban her from taking drugs that do not increase her performance, and at the same time allow Valieva to participate in competitions after a positive test result for a drug that really works.

Richardson explained on the Today Show in July that she used marijuana after being shocked by the news of the death of her biological mother. She learned about this from a reporter.

“It’s definitely been a very tough topic for me, and people don’t really understand what it’s like to writhe your face, go out in front of the world and hide your pain.”

She was suspended from the sport for 30 days, which deprived her of her chances to participate in the 2020 Olympic Games.

Now the athletics star is revealing how long it took to get Valieva’s results, which were obtained in December.

“[She] failed in December and the world only found out about it now, however my results were published within a week and my name [and] talent was killed for the people,” she wrote on Twitter on Monday.

Valieva, who is only 15 years old, is considered a “protected person” because she is a minor and therefore under different rules than adult athletes.

Richardson, pictured in Eugene, Oregon, in June, wowed fans by completing her Olympic 100-meter race in just 10.86 seconds, earning her a place on team USA.

Richardson, pictured in Eugene, Oregon, in June, wowed fans by completing her Olympic 100-meter race in just 10.86 seconds, earning her a place on team USA.

Hours before it was revealed that Richardson had tested positive for marijuana in July, she sent a tweet saying, "I'm human."

Hours before it was revealed that Richardson had tested positive for marijuana in July, she sent a tweet saying, “I’m human.”

Athletes under the age of 16, such as Valieva, have more rights under anti-doping rules and are generally not responsible for taking prohibited substances. The focus of any future investigation will be on her trainers, doctors and nutritionists.

Officials said Monday that the ban could cause her “irreparable harm” — as did Richardson, who faced harsh criticism after the scandal erupted.

Cas stated in its ruling: “The expert commission reviewed the fundamental principles of fairness, proportionality, irreparable harm and the relative balance of interests between applicants and an athlete who did not test positive during the Beijing Olympics and who is still subject to punishment.” a disciplinary procedure on the merits following a positive anti-doping test conducted in December 2021.

“In particular, the commission considered that the exclusion of an athlete from participating in the Olympic Games would cause her irreparable harm in these circumstances.

“The CAS Commission also stressed that there are serious problems with the late notification of the results of the athlete’s anti-doping test conducted in December 2021, which prevented the athlete from establishing certain legal requirements in her favor, while such a late notification was not her fault, at the height of the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing.”

A 15-year-old girl is considered a "protected person" because of her age and is judged by different rules than adult athletes. THE CAS cited that the ban could cause her "irreparable harm." However, if Valieva wins, there will be no award ceremony.

A 15-year-old girl is considered a “protected person” because of her age and is judged by different rules than adult athletes. THE CAS cited that the ban could cause her “irreparable harm.” However, if Valieva wins, there will be no award ceremony.

Athletes under the age of 16, such as Valieva, have more rights under anti-doping rules and are generally not responsible for taking prohibited substances. The focus of any future investigation will be her trainers, including Eteri Tutberidze, doctors and nutritionists.

Athletes under the age of 16, such as Valieva, have more rights under anti-doping rules and are generally not responsible for taking prohibited substances. The focus of any future investigation will be her trainers, including Eteri Tutberidze, doctors and nutritionists.

However, Richardson is not the only one who is outraged by the CAS’s decision to allow her to compete. The decision sparked outrage from fellow competitors, who said it smacked of corruption and showed “Russia’s disregard for clean sport.”

Former U.S. Olympic champion Tara Lipinski said Valieva’s age should not influence her decision and called her recovery “an irreversible scar in our sport.”

And after the decision of the Swiss CAS, the Olympic Committee announced that although Valieva will be allowed to participate in women’s singles figure skating competitions, there will be no award ceremony if she is among the medalists.

How the doping scandal with the phenomenon of Russian figure skating Kamila Valieva unfolded

February 6: Valieva makes her Olympic debut in the mixed team short program. Her program scored 90.18 points, slightly less than her own world record of 90.45.

FEBRUARY 7: Valieva becomes the first skater to make the quadruple jump at the Olympics, as her free skate ensures Russia wins the mixed team competition.

FEB. 8: The mixed team awards ceremony is delayed by what the International Skating Union (ISU) calls a “legal issue” that requires further consultation.

Feb. 9: Inside The Games calls Valieva a figure skater at the center of a doping investigation that delays the awarding of medals.

Feb. 11: The International Testing Agency (ITA) confirms Valieva’s positive test result for the banned cardiac drug trimetazidine on Christmas Day. It says it is appealing against the lifting of the temporary disqualification by the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

Feb. 12: The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the ISU confirm that they have also filed lawsuits with the Court of Arbitration for Sport, whose special committee meets to hear the case. Valieva, who continues to train in Beijing, speaks via video link.

FEBRUARY 14: CAS announces that Valieva has been allowed to compete. CAS cited “exceptional circumstances” for the decision, largely related to its status as a “protected person” in the World Anti-Doping Code.

As earlier this week, when the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) won gold in team figure skating competitions on February 8, if Valieva takes part in any of her upcoming competitions, there will be no award ceremony. The ceremony was postponed after Valieva tested positive for trimetazidine, which may boost performance. Because of this rule, Team USA was unable to accept its medals at the ceremony.

In the team event, Valieva made a historic quadruple jump – the first women’s jump at the Winter Olympics.

Russia was banned from participating in the Games for four years after several athletes were caught doping. Although individual athletes can compete for OCD.

Last night, the CAS commission said Valieva should continue to speak out because of the “exceptional circumstances” of her case.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said it was disappointed with the decision as “it appears that the CAS commission has decided not to apply the provisions of the Code, which does not allow specific exceptions to be made with regard to mandatory suspensions.” for “protected persons”, including minors,

“With regard to the analysis of athlete samples, WADA always expects anti-doping organizations to liaise with laboratories to ensure that they speed up the analysis of samples so that results are obtained before athletes go to or take part in major competitions.”

The statement blamed Russia for not speeding up Valieva’s sample so that there would be a result before the Beijing Olympics.

“In this case, the sample was not marked by RUSADA as a priority when it was obtained by the anti-doping laboratory in Stockholm, Sweden. This meant that the laboratory did not know how to speed up the analysis of this sample, “the report said.

Former U.S. Olympic champion Tara Lipinski tweeted: “There was a positive test at the end of the day and I have no doubt she should not be allowed to compete. Regardless of the age or time of the test/results. I believe it will leave an indelible mark on our sport.”

Meanwhile, two-time Olympic figure skating champion Johnny Weir said: “I can’t put up with this decision. There was a positive drug test, so an athlete who has tested positive, regardless of age or time of the test/result, should not be allowed to compete with clean athletes.”

The U.S. Olympic Committee (USPOC) described the decision as “another chapter in Russia’s systematic and widespread disregard for clean sport.”

Nevertheless, Russian officials welcomed the decision, and the ROC said: “Tomorrow the whole country will be rooting for her and all our wonderful skaters in the individual competition.”

President of the Figure Skating Federation of Russia Alexander Gorshkov said: “I am very happy for Valieva and glad that common sense and justice have triumphed.”

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