Two ugly dogs became best friends after a family adopted them five years apart.

Two ugly dogs became best friends after a family adopted them five years apart.

Two ugly dogs become best friends after being adopted by the same family five years apart.

The founder and director of Luvable Dog Rescue, Liesl Wilhardt, 53, shared her perspective on Picasso and Newt’s unbreakable friendship.

Both dogs have facial deformities and live with Wilhardt on 55 acres of land at their home in Eugene, Oregon.

Two ugly dogs - Picasso and Newt - (pictured left and right, respectively) became best friends after the same family adopted them five years apart.

Two ugly dogs – Picasso and Newt – (pictured left and right, respectively) became best friends after the same family adopted them five years apart.

Liesl adopted Picasso in 2017 after the sudden death of his brother Pablo and later adopted Newt in 2021, and the two soon became inseparable.

Five-year-old Picasso was born with a twisted muzzle, and one-year-old Newt suffered an injury from his mother’s bite, leaving him with no upper jaw.

Picasso’s condition, called crooked mouth, which causes one side of the jaw to grow larger than the other, resulting in a distorted appearance that closely resembles the artwork created by his namesake, Pablo Picasso.

The disease can occur in many other animal species, as well as in dogs, and does not cause any pain, but it makes adoption of pets much more difficult.

Despite the daily challenges due to their deformity and Newt’s health problems, the couple now live a very happy life.

Founder and director of Luvable Dog Rescue, 53-year-old Liesl Wilhardt shared a look at Picasso and Newt's enduring friendship. Both dogs have facial deformities and live with Wilhardt on 55 acres of land at their home in Eugene, Oregon.

Founder and director of Luvable Dog Rescue, 53-year-old Liesl Wilhardt (left) shared a look at Picasso and Newt’s unbreakable friendship. Both dogs (right) have facial deformities and live with Wilhardt on 55 acres of land at their home in Eugene, Oregon.

Wilhardt gave her followers a glimpse into their friendship with a series of clips of their daily activities, including feeding, playing together, walking and picking berries.

“It’s a miracle that Picasso survived infancy, because it would have been very difficult for him to even breastfeed from his mother,” Liesl said.

“Newt had a lot more problems and, oddly enough, the bigger problems were not caused by his missing upper jaw.

“Both Picasso and Newt love people, so in public they are very outgoing, seek attention and like to greet people.

Wilhardt gave her followers a glimpse into their friendship with a series of clips of their daily activities, including feeding, playing together, walking and picking berries.

Wilhardt gave her followers a glimpse into their friendship with a series of clips of their daily activities, including feeding, playing together, walking and picking berries.

Explaining why her lovable dog Picasso looks so unusual, Liesl said in 2017:

Explaining why her lovable dog Picasso looks so unusual, Liesl said in 2017: “Picasso’s jaw just crooked. The vets say he’s not in pain. Sometimes he has trouble eating, but other than that he’s fine.”

“Most people jump to conclusions and then look at dogs for a while, trying to figure out what they are seeing.

“They don’t experience any pain; they have adapted to their physical problems and do almost anything they want.

“Picasso loved Newt from the very beginning because Newt loves to play and fight and he is so good-natured. This friendship deepened as Newt grew older.

“I love Picasso and Newt with all my heart, they are both incredibly loving, happy, intelligent and funny dogs.”

Picasso even has his own Instagram account, where he has over 274,000 followers.

Liesl has rescued hundreds of disabled animals and owns 55 acres of woodland where she provides the perfect home for dogs, cats, chickens and even pigs, one of whom is Picasso’s best friend.

Some of the other pets include five pit bulls named Buddha, Nenna, Piggy, Owl, and Maverick, and a pug/chihuahua mix named Hazel.

Liesl also rescued five pigs; Bernard, Kun-Kun, Debbie, a huge Yorkshire pig, Jack-Jack, Kun-Kun, and Donut and Nunners, a mix of Yorkshire pigs.

Brood: Liesl has rescued hundreds of dogs and other animals over the years.

Brood: Liesl has rescued hundreds of dogs and other animals over the years.

The rescue center also took in several cats and their litters, and Liesl herself adopted ten dogs and rescued a pig named Pax.

Most dogs come from overcrowded California shelters where there are more animals than homes, including Picasso.

A devoted animal lover who lives on the land where the center is located, spends several hours a day preparing food for the animals, feeding them and cleaning them.

Many dogs have various medical conditions and need surgery or amputation, which she pays for.

In 2021, Liesl said she hired six people to take care of the animals all the time, and they all take the dogs out for daily walks on a regular basis.

Other volunteers come during the week to walk the dogs, play with the pigs, and interact with the cats and kittens.

Speaking in 2017, Liesl, who founded Luvable Dog Rescue 22 years ago, said of Picasso, “Picasso is a special dog with an exceptional temperament.

After realizing that she had fallen in love with Picasso, she realized that she wanted to keep him as her own.  Picasso now spends his days helping the handicapped or sick as part of the Liesl Rescue Program. Picasso spends his days helping the handicapped or sick as part of the Liesl Rescue Program.

After realizing that she had fallen in love with Picasso, she realized that she wanted to keep him as her own. Picasso now spends all day helping the disabled or sick as part of the Liesl Rescue Program. Pictured: Picasso interacts with a woman in a wheelchair as part of the program.

“I just fell in love with him as soon as I saw him. He trains as a certified therapy dog ​​and also serves as an ambassador for Luvable Dog Rescue.

“He lives in my house with nine other rescued dogs. Picasso boldly moves forward in his therapy and service dog training without his brother by his side for the first time in his life.

“When Pablo died, it was just heartbreaking. They were so close. They were always together.

She said that at the time, Picasso spent his days helping the handicapped or sick through the Liesl Rescue Program.

“Now we are working to formally train him as a rescue dog. He works with people who are sick or need help,” she said.

“I love this boy so much and he has had a hell of a hard life so far. I want the rest of his life to be amazing.”

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