Trump intends to remove co-owner of the Republican Cleveland Guardians, running for the Senate

Trump intends to remove co-owner of the Republican Cleveland Guardians, running for the Senate

Former President Donald Trump is trying to figure out how to defeat Ohio Republican Senate nominee Matt Dolan, whose billionaire family owns the newly renamed Cleveland Guardians baseball team.

Politico reported on Monday that Dolan’s candidacy is the focus of Trump’s attention, with the ex-president mentioning the Ohio senator in meetings, phone calls and chats.

Trump will have to decide if he wants to support one of the pro-MAGA candidates in a crowded field to compensate for Dolan, who criticized the “big lies” on January 6 and does not mention the former president in his television ads.

Former President Donald Trump Republican in Ohio Senate hopes state senator Matt Dolan

Former President Donald Trump (left) is trying to figure out how to defeat Ohio Republican Senate nominee Matt Dolan (right), whose billionaire family owns the Cleveland Guardians baseball team.

During the attack on the Capitol, Matt Dolan called on Trump and said he

During the attack on the Capitol, Matt Dolan called on Trump and said he “perpetuated lies about the November 2020 election results.”

Without a Trump-backed choice, the MAGA field could split the vote, giving Dolan, who is putting $10 million into his own campaign and benefiting from his family’s super PAC with $3 million in reserves, an advantage.

However, if Trump chooses the wrong candidate with ties to Trump, it could spell trouble for his attempts to play the GOP’s top kingmaker.

The Ohio Republican primary will be held on May 3.

Candidates are vying for the seat of outgoing Republican Senator Rob Portman.

When Dolan announced his run for the Senate in September, Trump called him RINO, mocked the candidate’s family for renaming their baseball team, and said Dolan would not get his approval.

“Anyone who changes the name of the once-legendary Cleveland Indians to the Cleveland Guards should not be running for the United States Senate, representing the great people of Ohio,” Trump said at the time. “The Atlanta Braves didn’t change their name and the Florida Seminoles didn’t change their singing, but Cleveland did, and they were there first.”

Dolan’s father, Paul Dolan, announced in December 2020 that the team’s name would be changed after years of pressure from Native American groups and following a national racial reckoning following the death of George Floyd last summer.

Trump correctly noted that Matt Dolan publicly criticized his family’s decision to change his name.

The hopeful Republican Party called the rebranding an unfortunate consequence of the “culture wars.”

But that didn’t help Dolan’s case with the former president.

Cleveland Indians logo Cleveland Guardians logo

The Cleveland Indians will be called the Cleveland Guardians for the first time this season. When Dolan announced his Senate bid, Trump criticized his family’s decision to rename the team, despite a state senator criticizing the decision.

“Despite this, a man named Matt Dolan, the son of the owner of the team, stated that he was against Cancel Culture,” Trump said. “Do these two things really work together?”

“In any case, I know at least one person in the race whom I will not support,” the ex-president continued. “The Republican Party has too many Rino!”

Dolan blasted Trump on January 6, 2021, calling the attack on the US Capitol a “failure of leadership.”

“Starting with @realdonaldtrump, too many so-called leaders have perpetuated lies about the November 2020 election results,” Dolan wrote. “And the people who trust their leadership trust them.”

“Real leaders lead, not manipulate,” the state senator continued. “The truth matters.”

More recently, he said his bid is about “one thing and one thing only: Ohio,” which is clearly a blow to some of the other GOP candidates fighting for Trump’s support.

Dolan’s campaign has insisted that he is not anti-Trump, but he is not building his campaign around him either.

Dolan voted for Trump in 2016 and 2020 — and he would vote again in 2024 if Trump runs again, his campaign told Politico.

Trump must decide if he wants to support one of the other GOP candidates to knock out Matt Dolan (second from left).  His options include Jane Timken (left), investment banker Mike Gibbons (center left), JD Vance (center right), and former Ohio treasurer Josh Mandel (second from right).  Bernie Moreno (right) dropped out of the race

Trump must decide if he wants to support one of the other GOP candidates to knock out Matt Dolan (second from left). His options include Jane Timken (left), investment banker Mike Gibbons (center left), JD Vance (center right), and former Ohio treasurer Josh Mandel (second from right). Bernie Moreno (right) dropped out of the race

JD Vance (right), posing for a photo with supporter (center) and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Green (left), seeks Trump's approval but criticized the former president in 2016, calling him an

JD Vance (right), posing for a photo with supporter (center) and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Green (left), seeks Trump’s approval but criticized the former president in 2016, calling him an “idiot.” harmful” and “offensive”

Politico reported that Trump was going to support Jane Timken (pictured) last year, but didn't like her initially defending Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez after he voted to impeach Trump a second time.

Politico reported that Trump was going to support Jane Timken (pictured) last year, but didn’t like her initially defending Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez after he voted to impeach Trump a second time.

“Other candidates were so obsessed with appeasing interests outside of Ohio that they forgot what they were supposed to be fighting for in Ohio,” Chris Maloney, a Dolan strategist, told the website. “We love the contrast.”

Dolan’s GOP contest features Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance, former Ohio State Treasurer Josh Mandel, investment banker Mike Gibbons, and former Ohio GOP chairman Jane Timken.

A Trafalgar Group poll this month showed Mandel leading Republicans with 21% of the vote, followed by Gibbons with 16.4%, Vance with 14.3%, Dolan with 10.2% and Timken with 9.8%. %.

Dolan’s TV ad appears to be giving him a boost as the candidate has doubled its support since Trafalgar’s last review of the race in mid-December, when the state senator trailed the other four contenders by 5.3 percent.

Politico reported that last year Trump considered backing the Timken, which is now in fifth place.

He decided not to support Timken after she initially defended Ohio Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, who voted to impeach Trump a second time.

Timken later criticized Gonzalez and said he should step down, getting back in step with the ex-president.

Trump’s first rally in 2021 was in Gonzalez’s congressional district outside of Cleveland so he could support his former aide, Max Miller, who was running to unseat him.

Gonzalez has since announced that he is retiring from Congress.

While the ex-president was courted by Vance, the most famous name in the country, the author has publicly criticized Trump in the past.

So much so, in fact, that in December, Trump called Club for Growth president David McIntosh to complain about a pro-Mandel ad featuring Vance posing as Trump, according to Politico.

In 2016, Vance called Trump “an idiot”, “harmful” and “offensive”.

Trump called McIntosh and said he was concerned that the ad might reduce Trump’s popularity in the state and asked that it be stopped airing.

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