Trump ally John Eastman handed over nearly 8,000 emails to Capitol riot control committee, hides 11,000 more

Trump ally John Eastman handed over nearly 8,000 emails to Capitol riot control committee, hides 11,000 more

John Eastman, the attorney at the center of Donald Trump’s efforts to cancel the 2020 election, handed over 8,000 pages of emails to the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 events, according to court documents filed Monday.

The former law professor is also trying to use executive privilege to protect over 10,000 documents after failing to block a 94,000 page email subpoena.

Eastman appeared with Rudy Giuliani at Trump’s Stop The Steal rally shortly before the Capitol riot, where Giuliani infamously called for a “trial by force” over the election.

Late last year, a House committee subpoenaed him for playing a key role in developing the ex-president’s legal strategy, which alleged that former Vice President Mike Pence had the power to overturn President Joe Biden’s election victory.

A formal request for nearly 100,000 pages of online correspondence was sent to Chapman University, where Eastman used to work. He was also asked to appear to testify himself.

Eastman unsuccessfully sued to block the release of the documents, citing attorney-client confidentiality. Instead, US District Court Judge James Carter ordered Eastman to go through 1,500 pages a day to list his claims for privileges late last month.

It still has about 48,000 pages to sort through.

Eastman (pictured in 2013) failed to block almost 100,000 documents from the Capitol House committee's riot control agenda.  Instead, at the end of January, a judge ordered him to list his claims for privileges and sort out what he could hand over to the committee at the rate of 1,500 pages a day.

Eastman (pictured in 2013) failed to block almost 100,000 documents from the Capitol House committee’s riot control agenda. Instead, at the end of January, a judge ordered him to list his claims for privileges and sort out what he could hand over to the committee at the rate of 1,500 pages a day.

Of those he’s reviewed so far, Eastman turned over almost 8,000 pages to legislators on committee.

Another 27,000 messages were not relevant to the investigation and were automatically hidden, such as emails with mailing lists asking for campaign donations and various newsletters.

Eastman and House investigators will appear in court on Monday afternoon to provide an update to the judge in charge of the case.

Lawmakers are reportedly specifically looking for emails and documents that link Eastman to Trump or his failed 2020 bid.

On Friday, House investigators complained that Eastman had been procrastinating with the process and only provided vague phrases to describe items out of the 11,000 he has kept under wraps so far, such as “legal arguments” or “proposals for consideration,” according to Politico.

House attorney Doug Letter complained that the former law professor’s excuses for hiding documents were overly broad.

“The Special Committee’s urgent need to resolve privilege issues is exacerbated by the fact that Plaintiff has widely claimed privilege on a vast number of documents, many of which appear to be critical to the Special Committee’s investigation,” Letter said.

Eastman appeared with Rudy Giuliani at Trump's Stop The Steal rally on January 6 just before the Capitol riot.

Eastman appeared with Rudy Giuliani at Trump’s Stop The Steal rally on January 6 just before the Capitol riot.

Trump supporters marched to the US Capitol after several speakers at the rally used inflammatory rhetoric, Giuliani even called for a

Trump supporters marched to the US Capitol after several speakers at the rally used inflammatory rhetoric, Giuliani even called for a “trial by force”.

Eastman’s lawyer suggested that the House was trying to speed up the investigation for political reasons, noting the critical congressional elections that took place in less than nine months.

“To the extent that the statements of congressional defendants about the “urgent need to resolve issues of privilege” are motivated by the impending 2022 midterm elections, this is not a valid reason for changing the ruling of this court of January 26,” the lawyer said.

The pro-Trump professor’s theories about how Pence could have canceled the election, especially in the seven battlefield states, have been eponymously called the “Eastman memos.”

Trump reportedly got mad at Pence when the former vice president dismissed the memos argument by refusing to go along with the strategy, shortly before he was scheduled to preside over a joint session of Congress to confirm Biden’s victory.

Eastman was also allegedly one of Trump’s “top lieutenants” present at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. from the evening of January 5 until the morning of January 6.

House investigators are curious to hear about this from Eastman as well.

The Willard Intercontinental Hotel (pictured) was allegedly the

The Willard Intercontinental Hotel (pictured) was allegedly the “command center” for members of Trump’s orbit the night before the Capitol riots, where they discussed ways to nullify Joe Biden’s 2020 victory based on “election fraud.”

The group, also led by Steve Bannon and former strategic adviser Boris Epstein, set up a “command center” outside of Willard where they reportedly received calls from Trump and discussed ways to steal the election clock before his supporters storm the US Capitol.

Trump adviser Jason Miller and former NYPD Commissioner Bernard Kerik, Giuliani’s top deputy, were also reportedly in attendance.

Trump spokeswoman Liz Harrington previously told DailyMail.com that the report, first published in The Guardian, is “completely false.”

On the evening of January 5, Trump reportedly called his legal and non-legal aides separately to discuss options to stop the attestation of votes the next day and delay the process until Congress receives a new electoral roll.

The report alleges that the calls were separate at Giuliani’s insistence that this would keep attorney and client confidential. He also cites “multiple sources” without going into detail as to whether they were present at all.

The calls, which directly link the former president to efforts by his associates to cancel democratic elections, reportedly came the day after Eastman released his memorandum.

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