TikTok is accused of letting white creators 'take over' Black History Month event with Nicki Minaj

TikTok is accused of letting white creators ‘take over’ Black History Month event with Nicki Minaj

TikTok has faced huge backlash after they allowed white users to participate in a Zoom meeting with Nicki Minaj organized as part of Black History Month.

Black TikTokers who attended the Black History Month meeting with Minaj on Feb. 8 said non-black creators drew attention at the event by making up the vast majority of the 400 guests and asking the “Bodak Yellow” singer the most questions.

“I was so excited to meet Nicky but I couldn’t even get in bro and just find out the reason is they probably gave her my spot,” @okayysophi tweeted. “I remind you again that it must be [Black History Month] lmao event.

On Instagram Live, Minaj responded to the backlash, stating that she heard the community “loud and clear” and that she “will have something else planned for them.”

– I hear you guys. I heard what you all said and let me see if I can schedule anything else for you guys.”

TikTok has faced huge backlash after they allowed white users to participate in a Zoom meeting with Nicki Minaj organized as part of Black History Month.  Non-black user John Barbachano apologized for taking a seat at the event. Whitman, who has over 4.5 million followers and goes by the pseudonym @bryanthediamond, mentioned a private email in a video in which he apologized for his presence.  He is a big fan of Nicki Minaj, as evidenced by a video where he reacts to the rapper liking one of his videos.

TikTok has faced huge backlash after they allowed white users to participate in a Zoom meeting with Nicki Minaj organized as part of Black History Month. Non-black users John Barbachano (left) and Brian (right) apologized for taking a seat at the event.

On Instagram Live, Minaj appears to have acknowledged the controversy

On Instagram Live, Minaj appears to have acknowledged the controversy

TikTok is accused of letting white creators 'take over' Black History Month event with Nicki Minaj TikTok is accused of letting white creators 'take over' Black History Month event with Nicki Minaj

“Trust me,” she continued. “I heard you all loud and clear.

“As soon as I heard that black creators feel inaudible/invisible, I told my team to zoom in again,” she commented on the Twitter post.

“We’re doing 1 more next week.”

“Do another Zoom for the same thing to happen? Lol the damage is done,” wrote another user.

“Damage done? Girl, stop. This time it’s zoom for black creators only, but thanks for not showing up.”

User Niccoya Thomas weighed in on the controversy by responding to @johnbarbachano who said in the video that “Black History Month is not just for black people to remember black history, but for everyone to remember black history.”

“Maybe if you were so interested in black history, [you should have said] hmm, maybe I should wait it out,” she said.

“Maybe I should take note of all the black people who are trying to get into this meeting that have come… Maybe this might seem a little crazy, I should sit back and be quiet and let black people have this experience. maybe I shouldn’t be asking questions right now, maybe I should grant that privilege to a black person during Black History Month.”

“You would be thinking to yourself, ‘Wow, we really took over this event.’

In another TikTok, Thomas said that “it was a black history event, but [TikTok] let all non-blacks and they raised all the questions ?? ‘

A disgruntled user said that “there were more non-black people in this meeting” and that more non-black people were talking and asking questions.

“We have to share everything with you people, do you understand that? Everyone who is not black just wants to infiltrate our culture and we have an obligation to give.”

User Nikkoya Thomas said that

User Nikkoya Thomas said that “it was a black history event, but [TikTok] let all non-blacks and they raised all the questions ?? ‘

TikTok is accused of letting white creators 'take over' Black History Month event with Nicki Minaj During the event, Minaj gave a speech about how black creators

During the event, Minaj gave a speech about how black creators “run the app” and are needed on social media, according to attendees.

Thomas tweeted that she[didn’t] know why [she was] surprised non-black creators felt entitled to steal a seat at the TikTok Black Creator Meetup.”

“It’s like they’re stealing our dances, trends and content, [so] why would they stop at our invitations?

Thomas told In The Know that there were users with verified TikTok accounts and over 2 million followers who had been creating apps over the past four years who were unable to secure seats at the exclusive event.

While TikTok has yet to address the controversy in a public statement, they apologized to attendees of the virtual event for the “confusion and negative experience” in an email.

“The meeting was open to our collective creator community,” the TikTok creator team wrote. “This was meant to give fans the opportunity to interact with Nicky in a unique setting to celebrate her new music.”

In an email, the team revealed that the event is not just for #BlackTikTok, a collective of creators the company launched in February. Rather, they said, it was “open to all” creative communities.

Thomas told In The Know that the way the event was advertised and its date during Black History Month didn’t make the same impression.

“TikTok knew what they were doing by the way they sold [event],’ she said.

“It was also disgusting how they didn’t prioritize their black creators for a month.”

Thomas said the “routine” questions of Minaj’s non-black creators have nothing to do with Black History Month or race. [her] what it’s like to be a “gay icon”.

During the event, Minaj gave a speech about how black creators “run the app” and are needed on social media, according to attendees.

“I figured she thought it was a place for black authors as well,” Thomas said. “She even said she was going to do something different for us.”

In an Instagram live taken after the February 8 event, Minaj said, “I heard you all say… Let me see if I can have something else planned for you guys.” Because, believe me, I heard you all loud and clear.”

On Twitter, Thomas thanked Minaj for giving black creators “great advice” and “supporting us on the platform.” In the same breath, she warned TikTok, telling the app’s team to “DO BETTER for your black creators as we are often sidelined.”

While everyone who attended the event received an apology from TikTok in their inbox, non-black users who “experienced backlash” for attending the Feb. 8 Zoom meeting received personalized emails from the TikTok creator team and were offered personalized phone calls. , according to Brazilian influencer Brian Whitman. .

Whitman, who has over 4.5 million followers and goes by the pseudonym @bryanthediamond, mentioned a private email in a video apologizing for his presence. He is a big fan of Nicki Minaj, as evidenced by a video where he reacts to the rapper liking one of his videos.

“TikTok themselves invited me to this event with Nicki Minaj as I am a creator on the platform who has been vocal on many issues in the black community,” he said in the clip. “When I couldn’t get to the event, they sent me several different links because they wanted to make sure I was there.”

“Since then, TikTok has also sent me an apology email for all the backlash I’ve received because obviously I shouldn’t have been there and it was their fault,” he concluded, sharing a screenshot of the email.

The email was addressed to Brian and another person and asked, “Can you both join me today?” I’m so sorry you’re getting such a backlash.

Whitman apologizes for ‘misreading'[ing] and a typo[ing] situation” in his video and said that he now understands that he should not have been at the event.

Thomas told In The Know that she found it “insanity” that non-black creators who were in attendance received personalized emails rather than black event attendees who “had been robbed of their safe space during their historic month.”

“Every time a black creator tries to contact us, he sends us his automated system, but he has time to write a private message and set up a call. [with Whitman].’

This is not the first time the app has been criticized by black users.

Last June, a “no-dance strike” erupted when Megan Thee Stallion released her new song “Thot S**t” on June 11 — something that usually resulted in a viral dance circulating on the social media app, as it did. . with his song “WAP” with Cardi B.

Two weeks after Thot S*** was released, TikTok had only 37,000 videos. By comparison, the artist’s “Savage” had over 22 million videos, “Captain Hook” had 2.5 million videos, and “Cry Baby” had almost 1 million at the time.

Eric Louie, a 21-year-old black TikTok star, posted a video on June 17 that appears to be initiating a boycott.  In the video,

Eric Louie, a 21-year-old black TikTok star, posted a video on June 17 that appears to be initiating a boycott. In the video, “Thot S**t” is playing in the background and “MADE A DANCE TO THIS SONG” is written above his head.

But instead of starting to dance, Louis flicked the bird at the camera, and the words above it changed to:

But instead of starting to dance, Louis flicked the bird at the camera, and the words above it changed to: “SIKE”. THIS APP WAS NOTHING WITHOUT BLACK PEOPLE

TikTok is known for its viral dances, which black creators say are often choreographed by themselves before the trend is picked up by white stars, many of whom have found lucrative success outside of the app thanks to large followings – such as teenager Charlie D. Amelio and Kourtney’s girlfriend Kardashian Addison Ray.

Several black creators say that white creators then don’t acknowledge their work and profit from copying them – sometimes even taking credit for creating them.

“Blacks have always known that we were being excluded and isolated,” Eric Louie, who has almost 1 million TikTok followers, told The Washington Post.

“Even in the spaces we have managed to create for ourselves, [non-Black] people forcibly enter and occupy these spaces, ignoring the architects who built [them].’

Both Charlie, who has 119.4 million followers, and Addison, who has 81.8 million fans on the app, have previously come under fire for not doing justice to black dancers when recreating their work.

Under Fire: White TikTok stars like teen Charlie D'Amelio have long been criticized for performing dances by black creators without credits - like Renegade's viral routine.

Under Fire: White TikTok stars like teen Charlie D’Amelio have long been criticized for performing dances by black creators without credits – like Renegade’s viral routine.

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