The moment the queen scolded 2-year-old Eugenie gently for stepping on her feet

The moment the queen scolded 2-year-old Eugenie gently for stepping on her feet

From her undisguised delight in winning money on horseback to the tender scolding of her grandson who stood on tiptoe, the new film is one of the most intimate portraits of the Queen to date.

The lengthy Platinum Anniversary documentary includes candid behind-the-scenes footage and reveals Her Majesty’s sense of mischief both during her official duties and in more private moments.

In one of the scenes, the queen is shown receiving money after winning the races. ‘What can I get?’ she asks the assistant. He tells her that she has won £16 and duly hands over the crisp bills.

16 pounds? Ha! she replies gleefully before beaming into the camera, visibly flustered by her winnings and breaking the oft-reported rule that she never carries cash with her.

The cute scene is just one of the intimate scenes that will be featured in Elizabeth: A Piece of Portrait when it releases on Anniversary Weekend in June.

The film chronicles her 70-year reign through rarely seen clips compiled from the Queen’s private collection, as well as clips pulled from broadcast archives. The result is a film that truly conveys the Queen’s sense of humor in insecure moments.

The Queen squeals as two-year-old Eugenie steps on her foot, helping four-year-old Beatrice onto a pony led by ten-year-old Prince William.

The Queen squeals as two-year-old Eugenie steps on her foot, helping four-year-old Beatrice onto a pony led by ten-year-old Prince William.

The monarch gently punishes Princess Eugenie when she gets too close.

The monarch gently punishes Princess Eugenie when she gets too close. “Ouch!” she screams. “You’re standing on my foot!”

In one scene, the two-year-old Princess Eugenie is gently punished by the monarch when she gets too close. “Ouch!” she screams. “You’re standing on my foot!”

Her squeals are heard as Her Majesty tries to help four-year-old Princess Beatrice onto a pony being led by ten-year-old Prince William in the grounds of Balmoral.

In the film, the Queen also reveals that she keeps a handwritten diary, before adding, “But it’s not really the kind of diary that Queen Victoria has.” He is quite small.

Of course, horses figure prominently. Her Majesty makes good-natured banter at the 1991 Epsom Derby, telling her mother, “Do you know that I haven’t looked through binoculars for ages. look at [me] – bursting into tears. I always watch TV.”

When the Queen Mother replies, “Perhaps it’s emotions,” the Queen replies, “No, Mother! This is if you look at the wind like that.

At some point, the Queen becomes so animated that she appears to be mimicking the cross signs used by bookies to indicate the odds of certain horses.

Speaking of the literal burden she has to bear as a monarch, the queen lifts her crown with a mischievous chuckle and says, “It weighs a ton… and you can’t look down because if you do, your neck will break!”

Her Majesty rarely shows self-doubt in public, but in a film made before the taping of her Christmas speech in 1991, she is seen asking David Attenborough of the BBC, who produced that year’s show, ‘Right?’

After confirming that her pink outfit is in order, she bursts into an infectious laugh, saying, “That’s a lot of luck, because it would be terrible if you said no.” I don’t know if I have anything else.

These moments of frivolity are combined with an overwhelming sense of the queen’s commitment to her duty.

During the Trooping the Color parade in 1981, she was seen riding a horse showing calm resilience, despite being shot six times with a starter pistol by a 17-year-old teenager, and in just a few seconds she took control of a frightened horse.

Speaking about how she ascended the throne at the age of just 25, the Queen says: “In a way, I didn’t have an apprenticeship. My father died too young, and so it was all very unexpected when I took the job and did it to the best of my ability.

“The question is to become something that a person is used to and accept the fact that you are here and this is your destiny.”

The cute scene is just one of the intimate scenes that will be featured in Elizabeth: A Piece of Portrait when it releases on Anniversary Weekend in June.  Pictured: Her Majesty with David Attenborough

The cute scene is just one of the intimate scenes that will be featured in Elizabeth: A Piece of Portrait when it releases on Anniversary Weekend in June. Pictured: Her Majesty with David Attenborough

The film chronicles her 70-year reign through rarely seen clips compiled from the Queen's private collection, as well as clips pulled from broadcast archives.  Pictured: The Queen cheers during the 1991 Epsom Derby.

The film chronicles her 70-year reign through rarely seen clips compiled from the Queen’s private collection, as well as clips pulled from broadcast archives. Pictured: The Queen cheers during the 1991 Epsom Derby.

The result is a film that truly conveys the Queen's sense of humor in insecure moments.  Pictured: The Queen collects her winnings after her horse enters

The result is a film that truly conveys the Queen’s sense of humor in insecure moments. Pictured: The Queen collects her winnings after her horse enters

These moments of frivolity are combined with an overwhelming sense of the queen's commitment to her duty.

These moments of frivolity are combined with an overwhelming sense of the queen’s commitment to her duty.

But the making of the film itself was not without tragedy and fate.

Award-winning director Roger Michell, best known for his 1999 blockbuster Notting Hill, died suddenly in September at the age of 65, the day he was putting the finishing touches on it.

Michell, separated from his second wife Anna Maxwell Martin, star of the series Duty of Duty and Homeland, is survived by daughters Maggie, 12, and Nancy, 10. He also has two older children from his first marriage to actress Kate Buffery.

Kevin Louder, producer of Elizabeth: A Piece of Portrait, told The Mail on Sunday: “We were working on the final mix, and then I got a call – he was having a heart attack.

“It was his last film that he finished and I’m glad because we had a good time working on it.

“Our archival team carefully reviewed hundreds of hours of footage and it was very interesting to look at some of it.

“It’s amazing to remember how charming the Queen was when she was young. Even in the shots where she meets Marilyn Monroe or Diana Dors, you naturally pay attention to the queen, not to the celebrity.

“There is a real shimmer about Her Majesty – a real joy of life. But there is also modesty in it. It’s unusual.

Elizabeth: Piece by Piece will hit theaters and Amazon Prime Video on June 3rd.

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