The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine

The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine

A woman whose experience of being deceived by a fake heiress is documented in a new Netflix series accused the streaming service of “cherry picking” reality to make their story “funny” when she appeared on ITV Lorraine.

Speaking from California, Rachel DeLoach Williams explained that she spent a year developing a friendship with convicted fraudster Anna Sorokina before $62,000 was lured from her during a generous trip to Morocco.

Former Vanity Fair photo editor said they met through mutual friends in New York city in 2016, and troubling flags didn’t start to pop up until Anna’s card started to veer during their vacation.

She claimed that Netflix’s portrayal of their friendship in the popular tv series Inventing Anna doesn’t accurately show what happened.

The story was divided: the audience of Lorraine did not show much sympathy and accused Rachel of “getting rich” by talking about her ex-girlfriend Anna.

Rachel DeLosh Williams (pictured) did not impress Lorraine viewers when she explained how she was deceived by fake heiress Anna Sorokina.

Rachel DeLosh Williams (pictured) did not impress Lorraine viewers when she explained how she was deceived by fake heiress Anna Sorokina.

Rachel, who developed a close friendship with Anna (pictured together), put a $62,000 bill on her card with a promise to reimburse her.

Rachel, who developed a close friendship with Anna (pictured together), put a $62,000 bill on her card with a promise to reimburse her.

Rachel explained that she was forced to put their $62,000 bill on her card after the hotel refused to let them leave without paying and Anna’s card was declined.

Believing that all travel expenses would be paid, Rachel said she was convinced that Anna would reimburse her for all expenses.

“I met Anna through mutual friends one night in New York in 2016. About a year before we went to Marrakech together,” Rachel said.

“I thought she was brave, ambitious and intelligent. About the same way I think the public is interested in it today.

“She fascinated me with such a mysterious courage that pulled me closer to her.”

Rachel claimed that their trip to Morocco a year after they met was supposed to recoup all the expenses, but fell apart within a week.

Rachel said: “Anna’s credit card stopped working and hotel managers started distracting her for a week.

“On the morning of our departure, I woke up to see that two managers had entered the villa and we were not allowed to leave until there was a valid card.

The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine The deceived woman does not evoke sympathy among the audience of Lorraine Many Twitter users accused Rachel of being "gullible," while others claimed she got rich on her ex-boyfriend.

Many Twitter users accused Rachel of being “gullible,” while others claimed she got rich on her ex-boyfriend.

“I was put in a position where I had to give them my own for what I was told would be a temporary hold. Anna said she would send compensation by next Monday, but of course she never came.

“It was a very painful and protracted realization [that she wasn’t going to pay me back]. It never occurred to me to ask questions of a friend, a person I had known for a year and whom I really trusted and trusted.

I had no reason not to do that. It was about three months after endless rewinds back and forth, fake telegraph confirmations, and she kept pushing the gate rack further and further.

“By the end of this period, I realized that this was someone I couldn’t trust at all, and everything she said had no real facts behind it. From there, I went to law enforcement.”

Rachel said Anna was very “cunning” and knew how to dodge when asked for money.

Rachel told ITV's Christina (pictured left) that she went to law enforcement after three months of waiting for Anna to pay her damages.

Rachel told ITV’s Christina (pictured left) that she went to law enforcement after three months of waiting for Anna to pay her damages.

 

She explained that convicted fraudster Anna would avoid saying anything weighty that could be considered a fact.

“The debt she owed me was more than I had earned in a year at the time,” Rachel said.

“It so happened that in a week I was going on a business trip, it so happened that I could go from Marrakech to France.

“This short friendship, which I thought was fun and not so serious, I didn’t think there was anything really at stake, it turned into years of reckoning with the emotional and financial consequences of a friendship that went wrong.

“After three months of gratuitous reimbursement, I eventually went to the New York District Attorney’s Office, where I learned that Anna was being investigated and that there was a broader pattern of criminal activity.

“In many ways, it was the worst-case scenario, but it was also the first thing I was told, which made sense after all the ambiguity.

“I provided them with the information I had about where she was and when, how I met her and who I heard her talk about running a business. I just tried to be as helpful as possible because after I was spinning circles, it was nice to be productive.”

Rachel said that in the Netflix series (pictured), the scam is portrayed as "funny" and "chose" those parts of reality that need to be included.

Rachel said that in the Netflix series (pictured), the scam is portrayed as “funny” and “chose” those parts of reality that need to be included.

Anna appeared in court in April 2019, where a jury found her guilty on eight of the 10 counts of fraud and embezzlement on a particularly large scale.

The scammer was sentenced to four to 12 years in prison in the state, not counting the charges brought against her by Rachel.

However, in February last year, she was released early for good behavior, and now she temporarily lives in the luxurious NoMad Hotel in New York.

“It was devastating. Today I’m happy and I’m doing well, but it’s always going to bother me because there’s an element in this whole experience that’s very eye-catching and distracting,” Rachel said.

“Even if you look at how it turned into this Netflix show that’s supposed to be funny, it kind of turned the narrative on its head.

“During my testimony, I was accused of using content for entertainment because I had a contract for a book and I was forced to disclose the amount I could have made from it.

Rachel (pictured) said she would never go back to where she was, despite her company paying off the debt with its credit card.

Rachel (pictured) said she would never go back to where she was, despite her company paying off the debt with its credit card.

“At the same time, I knew that Anna’s lawyer and Anna herself were working with Netflix, and there were Netflix writers in the courtroom.”

Shonda Rhimes made a 10-episode series about Anna for Netflix, featuring a Russian-born German woman who moved to the U.S. in 2013, befriended wealthy socialites before luring thousands of dollars from them, promising she would transfer funds from Germany.

Sharing her frustration with the series, Rachel said, “It’s very surreal because it’s a version of the story completely divorced from most of the truth.”

“This story on Netflix balances on a very fine line between fact and fiction. These are cherry slices of reality and their rearrangement.

“I think it’s very dangerous because we humans create beliefs based on our connection to stories. Scammers are good storytellers, and it’s another beautiful, convoluted story that tells something detached from the people and events it depicts.

Rachel, whose debt was paid off by a credit card company, explained that it was a “painful” experience.

She added: “I’m proud to have developed resilience, but I’ll never go back to what came before.”

Anna Delvey: A Fake Heiress Who Deceived New York City’s High Society

Sorokina was born in Russia in 1991 and moved to Germany in 2007 when she was 16, along with her younger brother and parents.

Her father worked as a truck driver and then ran a transportation company until she became insolvent in 2013. He then opened a heating and cooling business specializing in energy-efficient devices.

After moving to London to enroll in the Central Saint Martins fashion school, Sorokin returned to Berlin and completed an internship in the fashion department of the public relations firm.

She then moved to Paris, where she got a coveted internship at the French fashion magazine Purple. It is believed that around this time she changed her name from Sorokin to Delvey.

In prison: Fake heiress Anna Sorokina went to prison for fraud with banks, hotels and representatives of high society in New York for $ 275,000

In prison: Fake heiress Anna Sorokina went to prison for fraud with banks, hotels and representatives of high society in New York for $ 275,000

Sorokina had already communicated with rich people even before she came to New York and began to blind the secular elite of Manhattan.

Acquaintances say that Sorokina for several years played the role of an art-obsessed German heiress around the world.

Back in 2013, she interacted with the fashion elite at Paris Fashion Week, and she was often spotted in London nightclubs such as Chiltern Firehouse and Loulou’s.

By the time Sorokina arrived in New York in early 2016, she apparently had social connections to make a name for herself, as well as a designer wardrobe that radiated wealth.

At the time, she had 40,000 followers on Instagram and was regularly photographed at events and parties with wealthy people.

She quickly began to prove that she was an incredibly wealthy heiress who had plans to shake up the art world of New York City.

Anna Delvi, aka Anna Sorokina, during a trip to Morocco.

Anna Delvi, aka Anna Sorokina, during a trip to Morocco.

She put on a show proving she belonged and regularly wore her signature Celine glasses, Gucci sandals, and expensive purchases from Net-a-Porter and Elyse Walker.

Sorokin rented a room for months for $400 a night at the expensive Manhattan Hotel 11 Howard, and he was often seen tipping $100 to uber concierges and drivers.

She also spent money shopping in luxury boutiques, expensive personal training and visits to a beautician.

She was drawn to the secular elite and regularly hosted large dinners for celebrities, artists, CEOs and the like at the luxurious Le Coucou restaurant in SoHo.

Sorokina continued to use the heiress’s ploy when she went in search of a $22 million loan in November 2016 to fund her new club.

Her downfall apparently began when she was kicked out of the 11 Howard Hotel in New York City in early 2017 after she racked up $30,000 and failed to provide a working credit card.

Around the same time, she also chartered a private jet for a trip to Nebraska to try to meet billionaire Warren Buffett.

However, the $35,400 bill was never paid, so the charter company canceled the return leg of its journey.

On her return to New York, she was evicted from the 11 Howard Hotel and transferred to the Mercer Hotel around the corner.

She subsequently undertook an extravagant trip to Morocco for $62,000. Her friend, former Vanity Fair photo editor Rachel Deloiche Williams, paid for the flight with her work credit card, assuming she would be reimbursed, just as Sorokin had promised.

They settled in a $7,000 villa a night at the five-star resort of La Mamounia, which Williams also paid for after Sorokina promised to return her money when it returned to New York.

The six-day trip went smoothly for several days until hotel staff insisted on registering a credit card because Sorokin had booked a trip without a working card.

Williams, who said she had $410 in her checking account at the time, said the $70,000 balance was more than she had earned in a year.

After months of extorting money from her, Williams reported Sorokina to the police and then to the New York City Attorney’s Office.

Sorokin was then arrested in October 2017 for stealing $275,000 as a result of numerous scams between November 2016 and August 2017.

At a parole board hearing in October 2019, Sorokina apologized for her crimes for the first time.

“I just want to say that I’m very ashamed and I’m very sorry for what I did,” she said according to the transcript of the hearing, according to the New York Post.

“I fully understand that a lot of people suffered when I thought I wasn’t doing anything wrong.”

Sorokin was released from prison on February 11, 2021.

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