Swimmer mauled to death by 13-foot large white on crowded Sydney beach

Swimmer mauled to death by 13-foot large white on crowded Sydney beach

A swimmer was killed in Australia after being mauled by a 13-foot great white shark in front of terrified bystanders who recalled hearing the man’s shrill screams.

Horrifying footage from the scene shows local fishermen helplessly watching as a predator attacked a victim in the Buchan Point area near Sydney at 4:30 pm local time on Wednesday.

One witness described how they saw the shark “swallow parts of its body” after tearing it in two with blood and then seeing it rise from the water. It was the first fatal shark attack in Sydney since 1963.

After the alarm was raised, rescue helicopters and rescuers on jet skis were sent to search for the swimmer, and dozens of local swimmers were ordered out of the water.

In the footage, a fisherman can be heard yelling, “Someone just got eaten by a shark.”

Shortly thereafter, the swimmer’s remains were found in the water, New South Wales Police confirmed. Wetsuit parts were also found.

Eyewitnesses recalled the horrific moment when a swimmer was mauled by a great white shark.

Eyewitnesses recalled the horrific moment when a swimmer was mauled by a great white shark.

Emergency services began searching for the swimmer and soon found human remains.

Emergency services began searching for the swimmer and soon found human remains.

Swimmer mauled to death by 13-foot large white on crowded Sydney beach

“The body is clearly visible on the footage, half of the body is taken by the shark,” the police officer told colleagues through the scanner.

They found the remains.

The horrifying scenes unfolded in front of dozens of fishermen and other beachgoers on Sydney’s beach, who heard the swimmer’s screams before the attack began, causing panic on the shore.

“Someone just got eaten by a shark. Oh dude! Oh no! It’s crazy. It’s a great white shark,” shouts one of the fishermen in the footage.

“The man is still there!”

“I just saw a big white explosion of four to five meters (13 feet) explode on the surface right here on the swimmer and it was like a car landing in water.

“Damn it, I heard a scream and the shark was just nibbling on his body and the body was cut in half right next to the rocks.”

“He came back and swallowed parts of his body, that’s all. It’s gone.’

A swimmer died after being fatally attacked by a shark on Little Bay Beach (pictured scene) on Wednesday afternoon.

A swimmer died after being fatally attacked by a shark on Little Bay Beach (pictured scene) on Wednesday afternoon.

Shocked bystanders (pictured talking to police) heard the screams of a swimmer in the water.

Shocked bystanders (pictured talking to police) heard the screams of a swimmer in the water.

Chris Linto (pictured) was fishing when he witnessed a horrific shark attack.

Chris Linto (pictured) was fishing when he witnessed a horrific shark attack.

NSW Police said in a statement: “An investigation into the swimmer’s death is ongoing and Little Bay Beach is closed as police officers continue to search the area.”

Police said they would work with the state Department of Primary Industries to investigate the swimmer’s death.

A report will be prepared for the state coroner.

Four ambulance crews and a rescue helicopter with a resuscitator and paramedic on board arrived at the scene.

The police did not provide any information about the identity of the swimmer.

“Unfortunately, this person suffered catastrophic injuries and there was little that the paramedics could do when we arrived,” said NSW EMS Inspector Lucky Prachan.

This is the first fatal shark attack in Sydney since 1963.

It is known that the victim was a local resident who knew the beach well and often swam to the cape.

“Some guy was swimming and a shark came up and attacked him vertically,” fisherman Chris Linto told Nine News.

“We heard a scream and turned around, it looked like the car had landed in the water, a big splash, then the shark was chewing on the body and there was blood everywhere.”

“It was really bad.”

Another shocked witness recalled how the shark dragged a swimmer under the water, and the attack lasted only a few seconds.

“At first he was screaming and then when he fell there was so much splashing,” he told ABC.

‘It was terrible. I’m trembling. The shark didn’t stop.

“I am constantly sick. It’s very, very frustrating. He just went for a swim, enjoying the day, but this shark took his life.”

Jet skis were also used in a frantic search for a swimmer before human remains were found.

Jet skis were also used in a frantic search for a swimmer before human remains were found.

It was the first fatal shark attack in Sydney in almost 60 years (pictured are rescue helicopters at the scene).

It was the first fatal shark attack in Sydney in almost 60 years (pictured are rescue helicopters at the scene).

Little Bay Beach has been closed as police continue to search the area.

All beaches in the council area of ​​Randwick, including Clovelly and Maroubra, will also remain closed for the next 24 hours and signs will be erected to warn people as part of “standard operating procedures” following a fatal shark attack.

During this time, lifeguards will patrol the beaches looking for sharks, the council said.

“The coast is the backyard of our community. Usually Little Bay is such a peaceful and beautiful place that families enjoy,” said Randwick Mayor Dylan Parker.

“Losing someone to a shark attack like this is scary. We are all in shock.

“The hearts of our entire neighborhood are with the family.”

Police will contact the Department of Primary Industries (DPI) to investigate the swimmer’s death.

“DPI extends its sincere condolences to family and friends and first responders at this tragic time,” a Daily Mail Australia spokeswoman said.

“DPI will continue to work with the NSW Police and SLS NSW to monitor the area and provide any technical advice and resources as needed, including the deployment of SMART drum lines in the area.”

Little Bay Beach is considered by Randwick Council one of Sydney’s undiscovered gems and a “secret” beach popular with locals.

The latest tragedy occurred after the death of a father and son, who were catching rocks in the same place two weeks ago.

The NSW government has spent millions of dollars on technology in an attempt to reduce shark attacks along its coastline amid public unrest by deploying nets at 51 beaches, as well as drones and shark listening stations that can track great white sharks via satellite and send out an alert. when one is seen.

According to the rescuers, they could not do anything, as the swimmer was seriously injured.

According to the rescuers, they could not do anything, as the swimmer was seriously injured.

There were three fatal shark attacks in Australia last year, including two in New South Wales, according to a database compiled by the Taronga Conservation Society.

No deaths have been reported in 2022 so far.

The last death from a shark bite in Sydney was in 1963, from a man bitten by a bull shark while “standing in the water”, according to a Taronga spokesman.

Police have urged campers to follow Surf Life Saving NSW safety guidelines.

The organization advises people to swim only in patrolled areas on the beach, to avoid swimming at dawn, dusk and at night, to stay away from schools of bait and to stay away from estuaries or muddy waters.

The SharkSmart app, provided by the NSW government, alerts swimmers and surfers in real time when a shark is spotted nearby.

NSW relies on a number of listening stations, drum tracks, shark detection nets and shark detection drones to protect people in the water.

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