Squad member Ilhan Omar defends Ottawa café owner who donated to Canadian Freedom Convoy truckers

Squad member Ilhan Omar defends Ottawa café owner who donated to Canadian Freedom Convoy truckers

Minnesota Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar defended an Ottawa store owner who donated to the Freedom Convoy in Canada.

Omar said that journalists should not cover and publish the names of people who made “minor” donations.

Omar tweeted in response to the editor of the Ottawa Citizen, who shared a report about the Stella Luna Gelato Cafe in Ottawa, which was forced to close after receiving constant threats.

The owner, Tammy Giuliani, was listed among the donors who, through the GiveSendGo website, donated money to a freedom convoy protesting the introduction of vaccinations in the country.

The entire list was made public after the hack on Sunday. The data included names and email addresses.

Omar tweeted how she couldn’t understand why journalists felt the need to report on people who donated as it led to harassment.

Tammy Giuliani was forced to close her business after she was threatened by a barrage of threats over her $250 donation.

Minnesota Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar defended an Ottawa store owner who donated to the Freedom Convoy in Canada.

Minnesota Democratic Representative Ilhan Omar defended an Ottawa store owner who donated to the Freedom Convoy in Canada.

Squad member Ilhan Omar defends Ottawa café owner who donated to Canadian Freedom Convoy truckers Squad member Ilhan Omar defends Ottawa café owner who donated to Canadian Freedom Convoy truckers Squad member Ilhan Omar tweeted several times during Wednesday evening.

Squad member Ilhan Omar tweeted several times during Wednesday evening.

The name of the owner, Tammy Giuliani, was listed among the donors who donated money to the Freedom Convoy through the GiveSendGo website.

The name of the owner, Tammy Giuliani, was listed among the donors who donated money to the Freedom Convoy through the GiveSendGo website.

“I don’t understand why any journalist would feel the need to report on a store owner making such a small donation instead of harassing him. This is shameless and journalists need to do a better job,” Omar wrote in a tweet Wednesday evening.

Giuliani operates two of his ice cream parlors in Ottawa, which have been forced to close.

Giuliani operates two of his ice cream parlors in Ottawa, which have been forced to close.

“I would like journalists to write the articles they think they are writing. Sorry, but your stories are not always balanced and often have a clear political bias. This announcement does not constitute harassment or attacks on journalists. Everyone has the right to criticize your story and its merits,” Omar wrote a few hours later on Wednesday evening.

‘Ps. I’ve read the article in its entirety several times and still don’t believe the story has any merit other than further persecution. You are all entitled to your opinion, but my opinion remains the same. Stories like this destroy people’s lives and are inappropriate,” she added in a follow-up post.

It’s unclear if Giuliani was exposed by journalists reviewing the data, but her name also appeared online as part of a hack leak after she wrote a message on the GiveSendGo message board.

“We got a call from the team and they said, ‘We’ve got a call here,'” Giuliani told the Ottawa Citizen.

I said, “What’s going on?” and they said, “They are threatening to throw bricks at our window. They threaten to come and take us away.

“We said, ‘Lock the door and we’ll find out what’s going on.’

Tammy Giuliani was forced to close her business after she was threatened by a barrage of threats over her $250 donation.

Tammy Giuliani was forced to close her business after she was threatened by a barrage of threats over her $250 donation.

GiveSendGo founder Jacob Wells called on the FBI to investigate the illegal hack and track down hackers who shared information about individuals online.

“It seems to be well planned. There are strong political motives behind this,” he told Fox News.

“It’s illegal and these people should go to jail,” Wells said. “FBI—I mean, it’s amazing we haven’t heard from any investigative agencies. We will contact you to make sure there is some kind of investigation into this matter. This is completely unacceptable.”

The GiveSendGo attack on Sunday night redirected visitors to a teasing clip from the Disney movie Frozen and a message that called the Freedom Convoy an “uprising” led by “known extremists.”

The hack has already had an impact on Canadians who donated – Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s chief political aide, Marion Isabeau-Ringuette, was forced to quit her job when local news outlet QP Briefing profiled her at his office for a $100 donation. .

Canada’s national broadcaster Canadian Broadcasting Company reviewed a list of 92,844 donors to contact and publish them.

It turned out that the former leader of the country’s Progressive Conservative Party, Chas Crosby, made a donation of $800. He did not apologize to CBC reporters, saying, “The indefinite state of emergency we’re in in most of Canada is dangerous, very dangerous.” I support the right to peaceful protest and consider the Freedom Convoy a peaceful protest.”

The CBC also reported that a well-known business owner in London, Ontario has made the largest single donation to the Freedom Convoy. Holden Rhodes, owner of Killarney Mountain Lodge, donated $25,000.

GiveSendGo said it was a dedicated team

GiveSendGo said it was a dedicated team “actively focused on identifying these attackers and taking action against their cybercrimes.”

The hack data showed that Canadians made up only 29 percent of the donor base.  Americans made up 56 percent of the donor base, while UK donors made up 2 percent.

The hack data showed that Canadians made up only 29 percent of the donor base. Americans made up 56 percent of the donor base, while UK donors made up 2 percent.

Frustration with the Canadian police's inability to lift blockades at the border and in the capital, as well as scenes of protesters relaxing in hot tubs outside Parliament, eventually led Justin Trudeau to apply for emergency powers earlier this week.  Trudeau, who was seen in Parliament Thursday, has come under fire from critics who accuse him of imposing

Frustration with the Canadian police’s inability to lift blockades at the border and in the capital, as well as scenes of protesters relaxing in hot tubs outside Parliament, eventually led Justin Trudeau to apply for emergency powers earlier this week. Trudeau, who was seen in Parliament Thursday, has come under fire from critics who accuse him of imposing “martial law” to quell protests against vaccine mandates and other pandemic-related restrictions.

The GiveSendGo website has become the most popular way to support the Freedom Convoy after GoFundMe shut down its donation page, freezing $10 million it raised after it said the movement had gone violent following police reports from Ottawa, Canada.

Wells said that because the donation page for Freedom Convoy was the largest the website had ever seen, it had been preparing for a cyberattack before Sunday, but the company was still caught off guard.

“We find it unacceptable on our part that this has happened, and so we are working hard to bring in the best,” Wells told Fox, referring to the company’s plan to call in “ethical hackers” to test the site’s weaknesses.

“We never want this to happen and it’s terrible for us,” he said. “The target on our back is really big because we allow freedom and a lot of people don’t like that. They will come after us as hard as we need to, to be better than ever before, and we are bringing people in to make that happen.”

Wells added that he believed the hackers were part of a “well-coordinated” and “very sophisticated” group intent on attacking the Freedom Convoy.

In a statement released on Tuesday, GiveSendGo said it is a dedicated team “actively focused on identifying these attackers and taking action against their cybercrimes.”

The FBI declined to comment on the incident.

The US Department of Justice did not immediately respond to ‘s request for comment.

GiveSendGo founder Jacob Wells (above) called on the FBI to investigate his company's website hack that exposed more than 92,000 Freedom Convoy donors.

GiveSendGo founder Jacob Wells (above) called on the FBI to investigate his company’s website hack that exposed more than 92,000 Freedom Convoy donors.

The leaked hack was used by Canadian journalists to pass on donors to their employers.

The country’s national broadcaster, Canadian Broadcasting Company, also reviewed the list to contact donors and notify them publicly.

It turned out that the former leader of the country’s Progressive Conservative Party, Chas Crosby, made a donation of $800. He did not apologize to CBC reporters, saying, “The indefinite state of emergency we’re in in most of Canada is dangerous, very dangerous.” I support the right to peaceful protest and consider the Freedom Convoy a peaceful protest.”

The CBC also reported that a well-known business owner in London, Ontario has made the largest single donation to the Freedom Convoy. Holden Rhodes, owner of Killarney Mountain Lodge, donated $25,000.

He was just as unapologetic after the CBC exposed him, telling reporters, “The excesses over the past two years have been astounding, but in the last two weeks in Canada, it has caused absolute alarm for anyone who believes in a peaceful and free society. ‘ he said. “Government at all levels must understand that they are elected to represent the people of Canada, not to lock up and threaten to arrest people for exercising their legal rights to peaceful protest.”

Hundreds of Canadians continue to protest against countries' COVID-19 mandates as they march through the streets of Ottawa outside the nation's parliament, pictured Wednesday.

Hundreds of Canadians continue to protest against countries’ COVID-19 mandates as they march through the streets of Ottawa outside the nation’s parliament, pictured Wednesday.

GiveSendGo said the cyberattack was

GiveSendGo said the cyberattack was “well-coordinated” and targeted the “Freedom Convoy” in protest of Canada’s COVID-19 mandates, pictured on Wednesday.

Leaked data from the hacked site GiveSendGo showed that most of the money raised for the Freedom Convoy came from Canada, not the US, contradicting claims by the Canadian prime minister.

Canadians donated $4.31 million to the vaccination mandate protest, less than a third of all donors, compared to $3.62 million donated by Americans, according to the data. The remaining $8.7 million came from the UK and several other countries.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said most of the donations came from foreign sources.

Americans made the most individual donations to the Christian crowdfunding site, accounting for 56 percent of 92,844 donors, compared to 29 percent of Canadians.

While many donors have remained anonymous, data from a Sunday night hack by unknown hackers showed that Silicon Valley investor Siebel donated $90,000 to the protesters, according to The New York Times.

COVID-19 vaccine demonstrators leave in a truck convoy after a highway closure at a busy U.S. border crossing in Coutts, Alberta on Tuesday.

COVID-19 vaccine demonstrators leave in a truck convoy after a highway closure at a busy U.S. border crossing in Coutts, Alberta on Tuesday.

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