Sports Nutritionist: How To Get Leaner And Stronger By Eating These Foods Before And After Your Workout

Sports Nutritionist: How To Get Leaner And Stronger By Eating These Foods Before And After Your Workout

Gabby Ward of Sports Dietitian Co, who also works as a nutritionist for MACROS.

Gabby Ward of Sports Dietitian Co, who also works as a nutritionist for MACROS.

The Australian sports nutritionist revealed that she encourages clients to eat before and after exercise.

Gabby Ward of Sports Dietitian Co, who also works as a nutritionist for MACROS, told FEMAIL that nutrition is the card up your sleeve when it comes to boosting your workout regimen.

Regardless of your goals, the majority of your training day nutrition should consist of training, the Brisbane pro recommends.

“When it comes to pre-workout nutritional advice, time before a workout really matters. If you have 2 to 5 hours, you can eat before your workout and maybe even have a snack,” Gabby said.

“If you have 15-60 minutes before a workout, we can only fit in a pre-workout snack.”

Why is it important to eat before a workout?

Training nutrition gives you energy to work, reduces stress on the body, supports immunity, allows you to better adapt and prevents muscle mass from becoming fuel for training, providing it with the desired fuel, i.e. carbohydrates.

Any medium to high intensity workout (regardless of cardio intensity and/or weights), carbohydrates will be your most efficient and preferred source of energy. The amount of carbs will depend on your daily needs, as well as the length and intensity of your planned workout. Guidelines for food portioning according to intensity:

– ¼ bowl carbs, ¼ bowl protein, and leftover veggies with some fat for a lower intensity or skill-based workout.

– 1/3 serving carbs, ¼ serving protein and leftover veggies with some fat for a 45-60 minute medium-intensity workout.

– ½ bowl of carbs, ¼ bowl of protein, and leftover veggies with some fat for moderate to high-intensity workouts > 90 minutes or training multiple times a day

For larger meals, Gabby usually aims for lean protein such as chicken breast, shrimp, very lean minced meat, with the exception of high-fat salmon.

“The closer we eat to training, the more important it is to be lean enough,” she said.

“That’s because fat slows down the passage of fast food through our GI tract, which means we don’t want to feel like we’re still digesting food when it’s time for a workout.”

So five hours before your workout, you can have a bowl of burrito with brown rice (carbs), chicken (protein), ¼ avocado (fat), and two handfuls of your desired vegetables.

Burrito bowl Greek yogurt

You can sometimes eat a plate of burritos a few hours before your workout, but if you’re short on time, opt for a fruit-free yogurt or granola bar.

But if you’re eating closer to three o’clock, it could be white rice, chicken breast, and one handful of vegetables or a salad.

If you don’t have that kind of time under your belt, it’s best to opt for a snack instead.

“Ideally, we want it to be a small amount of food, fast-digesting carbohydrates that are low in protein, fat and fiber to ensure fast digestion, and by the time we start exercising we are ready to replenish our fuel,” said Gabby. .

“Examples of this would be bananas, dried fruits, toast with honey or jam, breakfast cookies, juice or a nut/seed free muesli bar.

“We don’t usually eat these foods often on their own during the day as they digest so quickly that they don’t fill us up, however close to training they are the perfect addition to help you during your workout, especially in the back. .’

Delicious gnocchi from Gabby to eat after your workout.

Delicious gnocchi from Gabby to eat after your workout.

Should you eat during a workout?

During a workout, really only people who train for more than 90 minutes at moderate to high intensity should be considered, and if so, a similar meal will be covered in the section on pre-workout nutrition – consider implementing this per hour. learning.

Another factor to consider is portability and convenience, so something like toasting during a workout isn’t possible, but some dried fruit, sports drinks, energy gels, or lozenges might be.

When it comes to training, carbs and hydration still come first. Something like BCAA won’t give you the energy you need to push through and get the most out of your workout, and isn’t needed when you’re taking the rest of your nutrition throughout the day.

Post-workout nutrition can be a lot easier than it sounds, and how aggressive this approach is depends on your personal training schedule.

“Ideally, we eat or snack within the first 1-2 hours after a workout to start the recovery process, but depending on how far away your next workout is will determine how much you may need,” she said.

“The closer your next workout is, the more we will need to get there earlier as you will be able to refuel in maybe eight hours, but if you train the next day it could be 24 hours and so on.

“Typically our recovery window is 24-48 hours, compared to the 1-2 hours people may advertise. There is merit to that, but getting something within that window is due to our body metabolizing that food more efficiently to refuel, but it still continues for the next hours and days.”

If you’re one of those people who lead a very busy lifestyle throughout the week, Gabby recommends always planning ahead.

Have healthy meals and snacks prepared as needed so that in the event of hunger, you can still take charge of reaching those wellness goals.

“On top of that, we want to make sure that we eat regular meals and snacks every 2-5 hours with a balance of protein, carbohydrates and fats, that we include high quality and high fiber foods from the very beginning of our workout. stay hydrated and get enough rest,” she said.

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