'Sex and the City' writer Candice Bushnell 'overwhelmed by decisions made' in 'And Just Like That'

‘Sex and the City’ writer Candice Bushnell ‘overwhelmed by decisions made’ in ‘And Just Like That’

Candice Bushnell has admitted to being “amazed” by many of the decisions made in the reboot of the HBO Max series Sex and the City, based on her 1996 book anthology of the same name.

In an interview with The New Yorker, the 63-year-old best-selling author revealed that she struggled to see herself in any of the characters or storylines, leaving fans shocked by the death of Mr. Big and the arrival of Miranda Hobbs.

“I’m really blown away by the many decisions that have been made in the reboot,” she told the publication. “You know, this is a television product created by Michael Patrick King and Sarah Jessica Parker, who have worked extensively with HBO in the past.

Honest: Candace Bushnell admitted to being

Honest: Candace Bushnell admitted to being “amazed” by many of the decisions made in the HBO Max reboot Sex and the City, based on her 1996 book anthology of the same name; seen this year

Bushnell continued, “HBO decided to get this franchise back in their hands for a variety of reasons, and here’s what they came up with.”

On a specific question, is she still connected with Carrie Bradshaw (Parker), Miranda (Cynthia Nixton) or Charlotte York (Kristen Davis), the journalist admitted that she was not.

‘Not at all. I mean, Carrie Bradshaw turned out to be a quirky woman married to a very rich guy. And this is not my story and not the story of my friends. But television has its own logic, ”the TV producer said bluntly.

Yikes: In an interview with The New Yorker, the 63-year-old best-selling author revealed that she struggled to see herself in any of the characters or storylines, which left fans crying over Mr. Big's death and Miranda Hobbs' newfound sexuality.

Yikes: In an interview with The New Yorker, the 63-year-old best-selling author revealed that she struggled to see herself in any of the characters or storylines, which left fans crying over Mr. Big’s death and Miranda Hobbs’ newfound sexuality.

'Sex and the City' writer Candice Bushnell 'overwhelmed by decisions made' in 'And Just Like That'

“I’m really blown away by the many decisions that have been made in the reboot,” she told the publication. “You know, this is a television product created by Michael Patrick King and Sarah Jessica Parker, who have worked extensively with HBO in the past.

Bushnell added that she stopped communicating with Bradshaw a long time ago.

“I’ve said this before, but when the character Carrie sleeps with Mr. Big after he’s married to someone else, that’s when I felt the character becomes something else. [than myself]” Bushnell said.

The finale of “Just Like That” aired earlier this month, though it hasn’t been confirmed if it will return for a second season.

Not related: When asked if she was still involved with Carrie Bradshaw (Parker), Miranda (Cynthia Nixton), or Charlotte York (Kristen Davis), the journalist admitted she didn't know.

Not related: When asked if she was still involved with Carrie Bradshaw (Parker), Miranda (Cynthia Nixton), or Charlotte York (Kristen Davis), the journalist admitted she didn’t know.

In October, the writer said the HBO series based on her New York Observer column was “not very feminist” — and she doesn’t think fans should “build their lives” on the show.

Bushnell added that while the show is “great” and “fun”, it’s just a TV show and there are many fans who let it “guide” itself through life when it shouldn’t.

“The TV show and the message at the end weren’t very feminist,” she told the New York Post. But this is TV. This is entertainment. That’s why people shouldn’t base their lives on TV shows.”

In October, the writer said the HBO series based on her New York Observer column was

In October, the writer said the HBO series based on her New York Observer column was “not very feminist” — and she doesn’t think fans should “build their lives” on the show; pictured this month

“The reality is that finding a boyfriend may not be the best economic choice in the long run. Men can be very dangerous to women in many ways.

“We never talk about it, but it’s something women should think about: you can do a lot less… when you have to rely on a man.”

Bushnell insisted that her original column was not only about men or the sexual act, but rather about “sexuality” as applied to everything in life.

“It was a broader idea of ​​what is sexy: being in business is sexy, being ambitious is sexy, staying up until four in the morning and going to parties is sexy. Talking about power is sexy. Getting to table number one in a restaurant is sexy,” she said.

But she also reflected on some of the not-so-sexy things that hit the New York social scene in the ’90s, like convicted sex offender Harvey Weinstein.

Bestselling Author: Bushnell insisted that her original column wasn't just about men or sex, but rather about

Best-selling author: Bushnell insisted that her original column was not just about men or sex, but rather about “sexuality” as applied to everything in life; seen in december

“New York was sexy. It was exciting, but at the same time it was full of landmines, like Harvey Weinstein, ”she added.

“These men are scary as hell. I really looked at these guys and thought: “How can women even be around them?”

The author had previously criticized Weinstein in a 2017 New York Times article, writing: “He was a rolling ball with huge bad habits. He smoked cigarette after cigarette, drank glass after glass. He spat, he cursed. You had the feeling that you didn’t want to annoy him.”

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