Scholars believe that the Neolithic Britons may have carried the stones 280 miles to build fences in Wiltshire.

Scholars believe that the Neolithic Britons may have carried the stones 280 miles to build fences in Wiltshire.

The mystery of how the components of Stonehenge were moved 180 miles to where they were located in Wiltshire has long troubled archaeologists and historians.

But now the epic journey that was involved in building the Neolithic structure may pale in comparison to what the builders of another structure nearby could have taken.

The researchers found that the stones used in the construction of the “palisade enclosures” near Avebury Henge, about 20 miles from Stonehenge, originated about 480 miles from Stonehenge.

In total, archaeologists have found 77 pieces of granite, known as gruss, in West Kennet, which is just under a mile from the famous Avebury stone circles.

They found that the stones, which together weighed about 48 pounds (22 kg), were quarried from the Cunian Cliffs in Northumberland.

If they had been carried south by humans, the distance would have been nearly double the distance traveled by the Pembrokeshire bluestones that formed Stonehenge 5,000 years ago.

Avebury itself boasts the world’s largest stone circle and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In an article for the journal British Archeology, the research team, which included experts from the universities of Bournemouth and Southampton, said the discovery was “without a doubt one of the most unusual and mysterious occurrences of non-native material in Neolithic Britain.”

The researchers found that the stones (pictured) used in the construction of the

The researchers found that the stones (pictured) used in the construction of the “palisade enclosures” near Avebury Henge (pictured), about 20 miles from Stonehenge, originated about 480 miles from Stonehenge.

In total, archaeologists have found 77 pieces of granite (one pictured), known as gruss, in West Kennet, which is less than a mile from the famous Avebury stone circles.

In total, archaeologists have found 77 pieces of granite (one pictured), known as gruss, in West Kennet, which is less than a mile from the famous Avebury stone circles.

They discovered that the stones were brought from the Cunian Rocks of Northumberland.  The pieces of granite somehow traveled 280 miles, more than twice the distance traveled by the stones used in the construction of Stonehenge.

They discovered that the stones were brought from the Cunian Rocks of Northumberland. The pieces of granite somehow traveled 280 miles, more than twice the distance traveled by the stones used in the construction of Stonehenge.

The West Kennet Stones were found in the deep pits of a mysterious wooden structure built around 2500 BC.

The researchers said they quickly discovered that these stones – igneous granite, not sedimentary rocks common in the area – were not “native”.

Some were arranged in a ring around the grave, which contained the remains of people, although the researchers were not sure of their purpose.

Although the researchers did not rule out that the ragugs were brought south by the movement of glaciers, and not by people, they still must have been collected from the coast of Norfolk or Yorkshire – the farthest south where they could be deposited by glaciers.

This distance is still over 200 miles.

To determine the origin of the West Kennet stones, the team used an advanced form of mineral analysis that they had previously used for the stones at Stonehenge.

They said there was “very little, if any” evidence to support “direct transport by glaciers”.

A piece of granite found at West Kennett in Wiltshire.  Researchers now know it came from Northumberland.

A piece of granite found at West Kennett in Wiltshire. Researchers now know it came from Northumberland.

However, they said the stones could have been brought to West Kennet by “a combination of people and nature” – a reference to how they could have been carried most of the way by the glacier before being carried the rest of the way by humans.

The team said they needed to do more research in West Kennet to see evidence of a “wider range of rock types” in Northumberland.

If so, this supports the notion that part of the way the stones were carried by the movement of glaciers.

However, if they are all of the same type, which is still confirmed by the available data, then this means that the stones were collected by people directly from the Kun rocks.

The research team, which included Mark Gillings of Bournemouth University and his University of Southampton colleague Joshua Pollard, added: “Was it just a pilgrimage or more mundane stuff like stories of migration, intermarriage, kinship and shared self-identification?”

Avebury is a Neolithic henge monument consisting of three stone circles.

The monuments, believed to have been built around 2600 BC, are the largest stone circles in Europe and a site of great importance to pagans.

In 2013, it was named the world’s second-best heritage site, ahead of such sites as the Valley of the Kings in Egypt and the Forbidden City in China.

A 2019 study suggested that the Avebury henge may have been built on the site of a “relatively modest dwelling” that stood there before it.

The Blue Stones of Stonehenge were quarried from rocky outcrops in Wales known as Carn Gedog and Craig Ros-y-Felin.

The Blue Stones of Stonehenge were quarried from rocky outcrops in Wales known as Carn Gedog and Craig Ros-y-Felin.

A research team led by the University of Leicester found traces of holes and ravines in the ground for its walls, as well as bowls and flint tools that testify to Neolithic craftsmanship.

It is said that the Avebury henge, consisting of several stone circles and standing stones, was probably built later to honor the memory of the people who lived in the house, who were so important that they were honored in this way.

That same year, researchers at Bournemouth University discovered that the Stonehenge bluestones were quarried from rocky outcrops in Wales known as Carn Gedog and Craig Ros-y-Felin.

This contradicted the popular theory that huge stones, up to 80 in all, were transported by sea through the Bristol Channel.

Professor Keith Welham of Bournemouth University said: “Some people think the bluestones were brought south to Milford Haven and placed on rafts or slung between boats and then ferried up the Bristol Channel and along Bristol Avon to Salisbury Plain. .

“But these quarries are on the north side of the Preseli Hills, so the megaliths could just have gone overland to Salisbury Plain.”

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