Rand Paul 'everything to' convoy of truckers with anti-vax mandate 'litter things' in US cities

Rand Paul ‘everything to’ convoy of truckers with anti-vax mandate ‘litter things’ in US cities

Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul even said that he would welcome a similar convoy of truckers in Washington, D.C. and said

Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul even said that he would welcome a similar convoy of truckers in Washington, D.C. and said “it won’t shut down the city because government employees haven’t been coming to work for two years anyway.”

Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul urged truckers to “litter things” in US cities during a recent interview in which he called for a protest similar to Canada’s “freedom convoy” in the US.

“I’m all for it,” Paul told the Daily Signal on Thursday. “Civil disobedience is a time-honored tradition in our country, from slavery to civil rights, whatever one may say. Peaceful protest, litter things, make people think about mandates.”

Paul’s comments in his Thursday interview came just as a Department of Homeland Security bulletin warned that another convoy could disrupt Sunday night’s Super Bowl game in Los Angeles.

But a recent report from the social media tracking company showed that such an event was unlikely as of Saturday.

The bulletin also warned that the convoy could be timed to disrupt a speech by President Joe Biden in Washington, D.C. in early March.

“That would be great, but the point is, it wouldn’t close the city because the public employees didn’t show up for work for two years anyway,” the Kentucky senator said when asked about the possibility.

“I don’t know if this will affect DC. It would be a nice change. Actually we would have some traffic.

He added: “I hope they litter the cities.”

A week-long standoff between police and truckers quickly spread from the capital, Ottawa, to the streets of several Canadian cities, as well as key border crossings.

Drivers are honking and using their trucks to block traffic in response to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s demand that truckers crossing the border from the US are either fully vaccinated or subject to quarantine requirements.

Some even stepped up their rhetoric, calling on the liberal prime minister to step down altogether.

Supporters and truckers in front of Parliament Hill during a protest in downtown Ottawa, Canada on February 12.  A firm that monitors real-world threats online said such a protest was unlikely to derail the Super Bowl after DHS warned it was possible.

Supporters and truckers in front of Parliament Hill during a protest in downtown Ottawa, Canada on February 12. A firm that monitors real-world threats online said such a protest was unlikely to derail the Super Bowl after DHS warned it was possible.

But while Ottawa-inspired protests and blockades of the movement have gained momentum in Australia, New Zealand and Europe, similar rallies in the United States have progressed more slowly, despite much chatter in extremist circles online.

On Friday, US organizers, including Penny Faye of an organization dubbed the Save America Convoy, told Reuters they plan to send the convoys this weekend or early next month.

But a report from Pyrra, a Washington-based firm that monitors potential real-world threats through social media activity, showed there was little sign of anything happening in Los Angeles at Super Bowl Sunday.

“I think they ran out of time,” Pyrra chief Welton Chang said Saturday.

He also cited a lack of consensus as to whether the big game was a suitable target.

A Reuters survey of social media also found no support for the Super Bowl plan.

For example, on TruckersForFreedom, the popular Telegram channel dedicated to news of protests in Canada and abroad, there was little mention of the protest.

A partner channel purportedly dedicated to the Super Bowl has just conducted a one-to-one survey of members on whether they plan to participate in the Super Bowl protest.

Protesters against the introduction of the Covid-19 vaccine block the entrance to the Ambassador Bridge in Windsor, Ontario, Canada on February 12.  On Sunday, police began arresting and dispersing protesters.

Protesters against the introduction of the Covid-19 vaccine block the entrance to the Ambassador Bridge in Windsor, Ontario, Canada on February 12. On Sunday, police began arresting and dispersing protesters.

The vast majority of the 8,000 users who voted said they would not be able to attend.

Meanwhile, the ongoing protest in Canada continues despite Trudeau and other elected officials repeatedly urging drivers to disperse.

On the Ambassador Bridge, one of the main protest points that links Detroit, Michigan, with Windsor, Ontario, Canadian police began making arrests Sunday after demonstrators refused to move.

It was the first major police action in a week-long demonstration.

“Power actions continue in the area of ​​the demonstration, detentions are being carried out. Vehicles are being towed. Please continue to avoid this area,” Windsor Police tweeted on Sunday morning.

On Saturday, police persuaded some demonstrators to remove the trucks they were using to block entry to a busy international crossing.

However, many returned on Saturday evening.

Hundreds of uniformed police officers were on the bridge Sunday morning, warning truckers that they could be charged with criminal disorderly conduct, according to The New York Times.

The officers were accompanied by a tow truck, which was used to move two pickup trucks that blocked their path to the protesters.

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