Nikki Haley says Olympic athletes must choose whether to represent "freedom" or "violations of human rights".

Nikki Haley says Olympic athletes must choose whether to represent “freedom” or “violations of human rights”.

Former U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley criticized American-born skier Eileen Gu for choosing to represent China over the U.S., saying “you stand for freedom or human rights violations.”

The 50-year-old former governor of South Carolina added that when it comes to choosing certain countries, “there is no middle ground.” Her comments were made during an interview with Real Clear Politics on Tuesday.

Gu, 18, is a U.S. Olympic skier who is currently a member of the Chinese team for the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing. She was eligible to represent both countries, but chose her mother’s homeland.

Her father is American, but Gu was raised by her mother and Chinese grandmother, who spoke Mandarin most of the time as children.

“As for citizenship, look, China or the US? You must choose a side. Period,” Hailey told the political news website.

“You have to choose a side because you are either American or Chinese and they are two very different countries. … Every athlete should know when he raises his flag, you stand for freedom or for the violation of human rights. There is no intermediate.

Gu, who was born and raised in San Francisco, has faced backlash from the US media for siding with China in games amid the country’s horrendous treatment of Chinese Uyghurs, a Muslim minority in Xinjiang, an autonomous territory in northwestern China. the country.

Former U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley said Olympic athletes should choose whether they represent

Former U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley said Olympic athletes should choose whether they represent “freedom” or “violations of human rights.”

Hailey told China's gold medalist Eileen Gu that

Hailey told China’s gold medalist Eileen Gu that “there is no middle ground” when it comes to representing the US or China. Gu has repeatedly told the media that she feels as Chinese as she is American, even though she was born and raised in California.

Nikki Haley says Olympic athletes must choose whether to represent "freedom" or "violations of human rights".

Gu is depicted with her Chinese mother Yan. She was born in San Francisco and grew up there. Her father, reportedly American, was never identified publicly.

Prisoners listen to speeches at a camp in Lop County, Xinjiang, China, a Muslim-majority northwestern Chinese province.  China is accused of carrying out genocide in the region due to its cultural and religious differences.

Prisoners listen to speeches at a camp in Lop County, Xinjiang, China, a Muslim-majority northwestern Chinese province. China is accused of carrying out genocide in the region due to its cultural and religious differences.

Hailey mentioned the human rights violations that Uyghurs constantly face, saying that she still has a hard time with those who are imprisoned due to differences in religion.

“I can’t get the images of people on their knees, blindfolded, knowing what’s going to happen to them,” Hailey said. “I can’t imagine myself supporting this or supporting China in any way.”

Haley, who was a member of the Trump administration in 2016, said she “hopes and prays” that Americans understand “that China has given us COVID.”

“China is stealing intellectual property. China is committing human rights violations,” she added. “And it was China that became the observer state, which will now begin to dictate terms to our American companies, so they began to leave.”

“At some point, we need to understand that it is time to leave China,” she concluded.

Gu, who won a gold medal in the women’s freestyle and a silver medal in the women’s slopestyle, has consistently avoided questions about her citizenship and whether she renounced her US citizenship to compete for China.

China does not allow dual citizenship, and Gu did not confirm on Tuesday that she still has both passports.

“So I grew up spending 25-30% (of my time) in China. I am fluent in Mandarin and English and also fluent in both,” she replied when asked if she was still an American citizen.

“So when I come here, I really feel like I’m coming home. I feel as much American as I feel Chinese. I don’t feel like using one or the other. They understand that my mission is to strengthen ties between countries, not to create differences.”

When the reporter asked the question again, the press conference moderator interjected, “Next question, please.”

Gu, who has so far won gold and silver medals in Beijing, avoided questions about her citizenship.  After the popular skier decided to represent China at the Winter Games, she found herself in political turmoil as many question whether she is still a US citizen.

Gu, who has so far won gold and silver medals in Beijing, avoided questions about her citizenship. After the popular skier decided to represent China at the Winter Games, she found herself in political turmoil as many question whether she is still a US citizen.

Gu, whose Chinese name is Sick Eileen Gu, is also a fashion model and an incoming student at Stanford University, one of her mother's alma maters.

Gu, whose Chinese name is Sick Eileen Gu, is also a fashion model and an incoming student at Stanford University, one of her mother’s alma maters.

Beijing is in the spotlight because of the way the government treats the Uyghurs.  The Chinese Communist Party was forced to provide more information about current events in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region from the United Nations.

Beijing is in the spotlight because of the way the government treats the Uyghurs. The Chinese Communist Party was forced to provide more information about current events in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region from the United Nations.

The fashion model and aspiring Stanford University student, whose Weibo followers jumped to nearly three million from just under two million on Monday, says she feels at home in China.

“Here is something like a tower, which is visible from the top of the track. And I also see it from my home in Beijing,” she explained, where her face is ubiquitous in the advertisement.

Gu told her critics, “I’m not trying to make anyone happy. I’m an 18 year old girl living my life trying to have a good time.”

She added, “It doesn’t really matter if other people are happy or not, because I feel like I’m doing my best.”

“I love the whole process and use my voice to create as much positive change as possible for the voices that will listen to me in a personal and relevant area for me.”

“I know that I have a good heart, and I know that the reasons why I make decisions are based on a greater common interest, and something that I feel serves the common good.

“If other people don’t really believe that this is where I come from, then it simply reflects that they don’t have the empathy to empathize with a good heart, perhaps because they don’t share the same morality as I am. to do, and, in that sense, I’m not going to waste my time trying to appease people who, in the first place, are uneducated and, secondly, will probably never experience the joy, gratitude and love that I was fortunate enough to give. experience on a daily basis.

She said that her critics did not share her sympathy, and that she refused to bow to them.

Gu is not the only American competing for China in Beijing. Two members of the Chinese men’s hockey team, including Jake Chelios, son of Hockey Hall of Famer Chris Chelios, were also born and raised in the United States.

CHINA CITIZENSHIP LAWS – DUAL NATIONALITY IS FORBIDDEN

China, unlike the United States, does not recognize dual citizenship – anyone who wants to claim Chinese citizenship must swear full allegiance to the country.

This means that people like Gu, who became a naturalized citizen through her mother in 2019, cannot also acquire citizenship in other countries.

In the past, this has caused some stars to renounce Western citizenship.

For many, the lucrative opportunities in the Chinese market are more significant than those in the West.

This is what makes some choose China over North America and Canada.

Gu’s case is more complicated because she made the transition when she was 15, and according to the State Department, a minor cannot legally renounce citizenship until they are 16.

It remains unclear whether she ever formally renounced her American citizenship, or whether China was aware of her citizenship status.

Neither Gu nor the State Department will comment.

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