NASA's Juno spacecraft took a stunning picture of Jupiter's crescent.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took a stunning picture of Jupiter’s crescent.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took an AMAZING photo of Jupiter’s crescent – a view that is IMPOSSIBLE to see from Earth, even with a telescope.

  • NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured a stunning image of the massive gas giant Jupiter in its crescent phase.
  • This perspective cannot be seen from Earth, even through a telescope, because Jupiter’s orbit is outside of our orbit.
  • This means that an observer on Earth can only see the side of Jupiter that is illuminated by the sun.
  • The mosaic was created by a citizen scientist and consists of seven images taken during Juno’s 39th close transit of Jupiter.

When it comes to out-of-this-world photography, it’s hard to improve on a view that can’t be seen from Earth.

But thanks to NASA’s Juno spacecraft, this astounding panorama of Jupiter can be enjoyed as if you were riding with a probe during one of its regular flybys.

Unlike the Moon or Venus, this crescent view of Jupiter cannot be seen from Earth, even through a telescope.

This is because Jupiter’s orbit is outside the Earth, meaning that an observer on our planet can only see the side of Jupiter that is illuminated by the sun, so the planet always appears full.

Spectacular: Thanks to NASA, this stunning panorama of Jupiter can be viewed as if you were flying with the Juno spacecraft during one of its regular close encounters with the giant planet.

Spectacular: Thanks to NASA, this stunning panorama of Jupiter can be viewed as if you were flying with the Juno spacecraft during one of its regular close encounters with the giant planet.

Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created the mosaic using raw data from the JunoCam instrument.  It consists of seven images taken during Juno's 39th flyby of Jupiter on January 12, 2022.

Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created the mosaic using raw data from the JunoCam instrument. It consists of seven images taken during Juno’s 39th flyby of Jupiter on January 12, 2022.

JUPITER STATISTICS

Distance from the Sun: 750 million km.

Orbital period: 12 years

Surface area: 61.42 billion km².

Radius: 69,911 km

Mass: 1.898×10^27 kg (317.8 M⊕)

Day length: 0d 9h 56m

Moons: 53 with formal designations; countless additional holes

Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created the mosaic using raw data from the JunoCam instrument.

It consists of seven images taken during Juno’s 39th flyby of Jupiter on January 12, 2022.

The Juno probe first reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016 after a five-year journey of 1.8 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers) from Earth.

No previous spacecraft has orbited this close to the giant gas planet, although two others have been sent to their doom through its atmosphere.

It is expected that the device will study the composition of Jupiter’s atmosphere until 2025.

NASA has also released a separate image taken by Juno, this time during one of its close passes of Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede.

Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system, larger than even the planet Mercury.

At closest approach last June, the spacecraft was only 650 miles (1,046 km) from the surface of Ganymede, offering a fantastic glimpse of its intricate details.

Most Ganymede craters have bright rays coming from the impact scar, but about 1 percent have dark rays.

One of the dark-rayed craters is visible in this image taken with a JunoCam during the close Ganymede Pass.

NASA has also released a separate image taken by Juno, this time during one of its close passes of Jupiter's giant moon Ganymede.  Citizen scientist Thomas Thomopoulos created a color-enhanced image using data from a JunoCam camera.

NASA has also released a separate image taken by Juno, this time during one of its close passes of Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede. Citizen scientist Thomas Thomopoulos created a color-enhanced image using data from a JunoCam camera.

The Juno probe, pictured here from an artist's impression, reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016 after a five-year journey of 1.8 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers) from Earth.

The Juno probe, pictured here from an artist’s impression, reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016 after a five-year journey of 1.8 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers) from Earth.

The crater, called Kittu, is about nine miles (15 kilometers) in diameter and surrounded by darker material ejected during the impact that formed the crater.

Scientists believe that contamination from the impactor produced the dark rays.

NASA said the rays remain dark over time because they are slightly warmer than the environment, so the ice is driven off and condenses on the nearby colder, lighter terrain.

Ganymede is the only moon known to have its own magnetic field, which causes auroras around the Moon’s poles.

Evidence also suggests that Ganymede may be hiding an ocean of liquid water beneath its icy surface.

Citizen scientist Thomas Thomopoulos created a color-enhanced image using data from a JunoCam camera. The original was made on June 7, 2021.

How NASA’s Juno probe to Jupiter will reveal the secrets of the solar system’s largest planet

The Juno probe reached Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year journey 2.8 billion miles from Earth.

The Juno probe reached Jupiter in 2016 after a five-year journey 2.8 billion miles from Earth.

The Juno probe reached Jupiter on July 4, 2016 after a five-year journey of 1.8 billion miles (2.8 billion kilometers) from Earth.

After a successful braking maneuver, it entered a long polar orbit, flying within 3,100 miles (5,000 km) of the planet’s swirling cloud tops.

Once every two weeks, the probe climbed to a distance of only 2,600 miles (4,200 km) from the planet’s clouds – too close to provide global coverage in a single image.

No previous spacecraft has orbited this close to Jupiter, although two others have been sent to their doom through its atmosphere.

To complete her perilous mission, Juno survived a devastating radiation storm caused by Jupiter’s powerful magnetic field.

A whirlpool of high-energy particles moving at nearly the speed of light is the harshest radiation environment in the solar system.

To cope with the conditions, the spacecraft was protected by special radiation-resistant wiring and sensor protection.

Its most important “brain” – the spacecraft’s on-board computer – was housed in armored titanium storage and weighed almost 400 pounds (172 kg).

The ship is expected to study the composition of the planet’s atmosphere until 2025.

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