MoviePass is back, but with eyeball tracking to keep you watching ads

MoviePass is back, but with eyeball tracking to keep you watching ads

MoviePass, a movie theater subscription service that closed in 2019, is being revived and will come with an eye-tracking ad service.

The original service allowed moviegoers to watch an unlimited number of movies for $10 a month. It proved popular, but brought no money to its owners.

This time it will be a tiered service, charging “credits” for access to movies rather than offering unlimited access, with a required number of credits depending on the movie’s popularity and time in theaters.

There will be multiple tiers, each offering more “base credits”, but users will be able to trade credits with other users, buy more, or earn more by watching a series of ads in the MoviePass app.

However, the adware will come with eyeball tracking technology that ensures they are actually watching ads and not looking for something else.

The service is due to launch this summer, but pricing details or how many credits the film will cost have yet to be released.

MoviePass, the movie theater subscription service shut down in 2019, is being revived and will come with an eye-tracking ad service.

MoviePass, the movie theater subscription service shut down in 2019, is being revived and will come with an eye-tracking ad service.

MoviePass, the movie theater subscription service shut down in 2019, is being revived and will come with an eye-tracking ad service.

MoviePass, the movie theater subscription service shut down in 2019, is being revived and will come with an eye-tracking ad service.

Stacey Spikes, founder of MoviePass, announced plans for mandatory in-software advertising at an event in New York City, pitching it as a way for viewers to cash in on ad consumption — trading time for free movies.

It’s adding PreShow, a software it launched in 2019 to offer free movies in exchange for watching 15-minute commercials, to the next generation of MoviePass.

PreShow requires users to watch the entire 15-minute commercial instead of just running it in the background to ensure advertisers get their money’s worth.

Each ad viewed will earn credits that can be redeemed for access to the movie in the cinema, although the call rate is not clear.

“Essentially, it creates a deal between you and the brand,” Spikes told Motherboard.

It uses the higher-resolution front-facing cameras on smartphones and facial recognition technology to know who’s watching when.

He showed an ad for a taxi company during a presentation in New York where if the user looked away from the screen, the ad would stop.

“We had an earlier version [MoviePass]where – you know what happened – people hung up, left, did not pay any attention to it, ”he said.

Spikes described PreShow as “a natural extension of movie advertising”, allowing viewers to directly benefit from the commercials they are supposed to watch.

Stacey Spikes, founder of MoviePass, announced plans for mandatory in-software advertising at an event in New York City, pitching it as a way for viewers to cash in on ad consumption — trading time for free movies.

Stacey Spikes, founder of MoviePass, announced plans for mandatory in-software advertising at an event in New York City, pitching it as a way for viewers to cash in on ad consumption — trading time for free movies.

He showed an ad for a taxi company during a presentation in New York where if the user looked away from the screen, the ad would stop.

He showed an ad for a taxi company during a presentation in New York where if the user looked away from the screen, the ad would stop.

PRESHOW: ADVERTISING EYE TRACKING SOFTWARE

PreShow is an ad-supported free movie ticketing service.

Users are shown a 15-minute commercial, and in exchange for watching it, they receive a free movie ticket.

It was developed by Stacy Spikes, who co-founded the ill-fated movie theater subscription service MoviePass.

So that users don’t just click on ads and then leave for 15 minutes to do something else, they added eye tracking.

“We had to build in facial recognition so you could tell that the person was actually looking,” Spikes said.

“If I look away, he will notice. He will pause if he doesn’t see me within five seconds. ‘

In an interview with AP, Spikes added that: “Nothing is being recorded. This is a motion detector.

“Nothing leaves your device, nothing is saved. (All advertisers get) is what a lot of people have watched these videos.”

“It eliminates middlemen, not people selling your data and giving away information so you have access to things. We are going to make it happen directly to you,” he explained.

In the demo of the feature, it appears as an option next to the movie page, offering viewers the option to get it for free, or at least get credits for it.

The credits work like a virtual currency that users can then spend on movies, Spikes explained, describing it as an opportunity to offer free movies and also ensure that advertisers who actually pay for that movie get value for their money.

The tracking software runs inside the device, using the user’s mobile phone camera to track eye movements and feed data back to the software.

“Part of the direction we’re taking from a web3 perspective is that it only happens on your phone, is unique to you, and credits earned are your credits that go into your virtual wallet that you can spend,” he said to the vice.

The credit system will act as a market where individual theaters can compete with each other offering different products for different levels of credit.

Users will be able to roll over unused credits to the next month and use them to take a friend, loved one or colleague to the theater.

Part of this Web3 game will mean that users will be able to exchange their credits, like a virtual currency, with other users who may need more while you need less credits.

There will be tiered plans where you pay different amounts, currently undisclosed, for different tiers of credits – with the ability to buy, trade, and earn more credits as needed – including earning them by watching ads.

This time, it will be a tiered service that charges

This time, it will be a tiered service that charges “credits” for access to movies rather than offering unlimited access, with a required number of credits depending on the movie’s popularity and time in theaters.

The number of credits required for a movie depends on the time of day, the popularity of the movie, and demand.

The first generation of MoviePass launched in 2011 and was acquired by data company Helios and Matheson Analytics in 2017, bringing the monthly price for unlimited movies down to $10 per month.

While this allowed them to increase their subscriber count, reaching three million within a year, they quickly used up their cash reserves and the subscription did not match the cost of providing access to films.

Spikes bought his company back in 2021 for $14,000, working with the initial 200 users who got a free subscription at an event in New York.

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