More than 25% of “hospitalized with Covid” are people receiving treatment for another disease.

More than 25% of “hospitalized with Covid” are people receiving treatment for another disease.

More than one out of every four people included in the number of Americans “hospitalized for Covid” were actually treated for another condition, according to a new study.

Researchers led by Massachusetts General Hospital looked at data from four major U.S. hospital systems and found that 26 percent of the cases included in the count are people who accidentally tested positive for Covid while they were being treated.

The study includes a period of time until the rise of the Omicron variant in late 2021, but the numbers influence how the surge data should be evaluated.

Covid hospitalization rates hit an all-time high during the Omicron Covid wave, but experts warn the number is grossly inflated. This study, which is still awaiting peer review, is giving Americans their first real indication of just how inflated the numbers are.

Omicron’s incredibly contagious nature, its ability to evade vaccine defenses, and its milder nature combine to allow people to be infected without their knowledge, creating situations where a person does not know they are sick until they take a test.

The researchers classified a sample of

The researchers classified a sample of “Covid hospitalizations” based on the true reason for the patient’s presence and found that at least 26% were misclassified.

The numbers were most inaccurate during the second wave of the pandemic in the summer of 2020, when some hospitals were less than 50% accurate in classifying

The numbers were most inaccurate during the second wave of the pandemic in the summer of 2020, when some hospitals were less than 50% accurate in classifying “Covid hospitalizations”.

“Because 35% [Covid] infections are asymptomatic, patients hospitalized for unrelated indications with an incidentally positive test may be erroneously classified as hospitalized with COVID-19,” the researchers write.

The study included Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in New York, Massachusetts General Brigham in Boston, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

A total of 1123 patients hospitalized with the virus between March 2020 and August 2021 were selected for the sample.

The researchers then classified each hospital stay by reason of admission.

Covid-related hospitalizations included people admitted to the hospital with respiratory problems, blood clotting, airflow problems and other common symptoms of the virus.

Non-Covid hospitalizations included people undergoing unrelated surgery, women giving birth, and other conditions.

A category was created for people who were injured, but not a single person fell into this category.

The researchers found that 68 percent of hospitalizations were related to Covid, while 26 percent were confirmed by other causes. Another six percent of hospitalizations cannot be classified.

This means that even before Omicron, hospitalization rates in large US hospital systems were grossly inflated.

“Misclassification of incidental cases of COVID-19 during hospitalizations is common5 and is of concern in research and public health,” the researchers wrote.

“For example, inaccurate reports of accidental [Covid].’

More than 25% of “hospitalized with Covid” are people receiving treatment for another disease. More than 25% of “hospitalized with Covid” are people receiving treatment for another disease.

The researchers also found that the numbers were at their most inaccurate in the summer of 2020, when the country faced a second major spike.

During the surge, less than 50 percent of reported Covid hospitalizations in both Mass. General and Beth Israel were actually caused by a virus.

This study was done using data prior to the Omicron period, and it is likely that the numbers were even less accurate during the recent wave.

Despite the milder nature of the Omicron variant and the relatively low number of deaths, the number of hospitalizations has risen sharply.

Many experts suggest that Covid itself did not contribute to this sudden increase, but instead Covid was so prevalent in the American population that anyone who was treated for anything was included in the total.

Massachusetts health officials were the first to separate actual Covid hospitalizations from Covid hospitalizations late last month and found that only half of that state’s “Covid hospitalizations” were actually the fault of the virus itself.

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