Meet the bisexual stick insect, half male and half female.

Meet the bisexual stick insect, half male and half female.

A pet stick insect shocked its owner when it shed its skin and turned out to be half-male, half-female.

The green bean stick insect, named Charlie, is the “first documented gynandromorph” of the species, according to experts at the Natural History Museum.

They said the creature, which shed its skin at the Suffolk house, revealing the bright green body of the female and the brown wings of the male, was “a particularly impressive specimen.”

Owner Lauren Garfield donated Charlie to the London Museum for scientific research.

A pet stick insect named Charlie (pictured) shocked its owner when it shed its skin and turned out to be half-male, half-female.

A pet stick insect named Charlie (pictured) shocked its owner when it shed its skin and turned out to be half-male, half-female.

The green bean stick insect is the

The green bean stick insect is the “first documented gynandromorph” of the species, according to experts at the Natural History Museum.

This image shows the different sizes and colors of a male (left) and female (right) stick insect.

This image shows the different sizes and colors of a male (left) and female (right) stick insect.

What is GYNANDROMORPH?

Gynandromorphs are not common in the wild, although the coloring or markings of some species make the results more striking than others.

A gynandromorph is an organism that has both male and female characteristics, or a male-female chimera.

It is often seen in insects, although gynandromorphic birds, snakes, lobsters, and other animals have also been observed.

However, she said that, unfortunately, the insect would have to be euthanized so that it could be studied in the future, because if they die of natural causes, the creatures “shrink and lose their color.”

Mrs. Garfield said that Charlie originally looked like the other stick insects she keeps and breeds at her home in Waldringfield.

But as it shed its skin, people started to take notice, so she shared a “weird warning” about the stick insect known as Diapherodes gigantea on her Facebook page.

“I have been breeding stick insects for several years – and (accidentally) bred a gynandromorphic stick insect from green beans,” wrote Mrs. Garfield.

“That means half the body is female (green side) and half male (brown side with a wing).”

Males typically measure between 3.5 inches (9 cm) and 5 inches (13 cm) in body length, while females grow to 5.5 inches (14 cm) and 7 inches (18 cm).

She said her son was so excited about the discovery that she took Charlie to school to show him to other kids before contacting an insect expert at the Natural History Museum in London.

After exchanging photos, she later agreed to send Charlie to a museum so experts could further study the stick insect.

In her Facebook post, Mrs. Garfield added: “This species has rarely been reported before, so Charlie (named by the children) has been signed and traveled to the Natural History Museum in London today to be added to their collection. and I was asked to write a magazine article about it. I’m strangely excited.

Experts said the creature, which shed its skin from a Suffolk house to reveal the female's bright green body and male's brown wings, was

Experts said the creature, which shed its skin from a Suffolk house to reveal the female’s bright green body and male’s brown wings, was “a particularly impressive specimen.”

Owner Lauren Garfield donated Charlie to the London Museum for scientific research.

Owner Lauren Garfield donated Charlie to the London Museum for scientific research.

However, she said that, unfortunately, the insect would have to be euthanized so that it could be studied in the future, because if they die of natural causes, the creatures

However, she said that, unfortunately, the insect would have to be euthanized so that it could be studied in the future, because if they die of natural causes, the creatures “shrink and lose their color.”

Stick insects molt several times, and Mrs. Garfield said that Charlie originally looked like the other stick insects she keeps and breeds at her home in Waldringfield.

Stick insects molt several times, and Mrs. Garfield said that Charlie originally looked like the other stick insects she keeps and breeds at her home in Waldringfield.

But as it shed its skin, people started to take notice, so she shared a

But as it shed its skin, people started to take notice, so she shared a “weird warning” about a stick insect known as Diapherodes gigantea on her Facebook page (pictured).

The insect expert she spoke to, Paul Brock, told the BBC: “The Lauren specimen has a predominantly brown (male) body shape on the right side, with full-length hindwings.

“The left side is not as wide as a typical adult woman, but wider than a normal man and mostly apple green like a normal woman.

“A gynandromorph, including this individual, has malformed genitals, so even though it looks like a male, it won’t be able to mate properly with a female.”

Mr. Brock said Charlie would be added to the Natural History Museum’s collection “where he would be of interest to researchers.”

Diapherodes gigantea is commonly known as the giant stick insect or green bean stick insect.

This species is native to three Caribbean islands – St. Vincent, Grenada and St. Lucia – and in the wild they feed on the leaves of plants and trees in the rainforest.

In captivity, insects eat blackberry, eucalyptus, or oak leaves.

They are considered relatively easy pets to keep, with a lifespan of up to one year in captivity.

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