London Museum to exhibit 300-year-old sheet with a message made from a human hair taken from a severed head

London Museum to exhibit 300-year-old sheet with a message made from a human hair taken from a severed head

A 300-year-old bed sheet embroidered with a love message with human hair that may have been taken from a severed head is on display at a London museum.

Anna Maria Radcliffe decorated old linen in memory of her husband James, who was beheaded for treason in 1716.

The third Earl of Derwentwater and grandson of Charles II, he was 26 when he was executed for his part in the first Jacobite rising, a story that was immortalized in Sir Walter Scott’s 1817 novel Rob Roy.

The inscription on the sheet, intricately decorated with flowers, leaves and a large heart-shaped wreath, reads: “Dress sheet from my dear Lord’s bed in the wretched Tower of London, February 1716 x Anne K. of Darwent = Waters+”.

Experts believe that the hair Anna used could have belonged to herself or her husband, or she could have twisted a combination of the two.

Creepy: A 300-year-old bed sheet embroidered with a love message with human hair that may have been taken from a severed head is on display at a London museum.

Creepy: A 300-year-old bed sheet embroidered with a love message with human hair that may have been taken from a severed head is on display at a London museum.

Anna Maria Radcliffe decorated old linen in memory of her husband James, who was beheaded for treason in 1716.

Anna Maria Radcliffe decorated old linen in memory of her husband James, who was beheaded for treason in 1716.

WHAT WAS THE JACOBITE REBELLION?

The 1715 rebellion is generally considered to be the first Jacobite rising, but in fact the entire movement can be traced back to the deposition of the Catholic King James II in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

Concerned about the existence of a Catholic dynasty, British Protestants turned to James’ son-in-law William of Orange, who led a successful invasion of England.

James panicked and fled to France, where the English Parliament replaced him with William and his wife Queen Mary, James’ Protestant daughter.

James then attempted to regain the throne, effectively becoming the first Jacobite to rise in 1689.

This led to violence in Ireland, where James’s supporters (mostly Catholics) were finally defeated at the Battle of the Boyne, and in Scotland, where, despite the victory at Killikrunky, the military conflict was inconclusive.

Further challenges to the British throne were made in 1708, 1715 and 1719.

Considered the first Jacobite rising, the 1715 rising was unlike any other rising since Killikrunk.

This was the only time that a major uprising also broke out in England – in strongly Catholic Lancashire – but again ended in the defeat of the movement.

After the death of James II of England and VII of Scotland in 1701, King Louis XIV of France recognized his son as James III and VIII, King of England, Scotland and Ireland.

However, this was not a title recognized by King William, and after the failure of the 1715 rebellion, James was forced to leave France and settle in Rome in 1719.

The following year, his son Charles Edward Stuart, nicknamed “Handsome Prince Charlie”, was born there.

Handsome Prince Charlie led the Jacobite rising of 1745.

Believing that the British throne was his birthright, he planned to invade Britain with his Jacobite followers and overthrow the Hanoverian “usurper” George II.

Charles launched an uprising on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan in Scotland and successfully captured Edinburgh.

In November, his army crossed the frontier and captured Carlisle, then moved south across Lancashire in the hope of enlisting British support.

Charles made it to Derby but was forced to retreat.

This eventually led to the Battle of Culloden which was the final stand of the Jacobite rising in 1745.

Over 1,200 people were killed in just an hour as the Jacobite forces engaged in a final stand, ending in a brutal and bloody defeat.

Charles was forced to make a dramatic escape to France, but his fleeing soldiers were ruthlessly hunted down and killed.

She was allowed to take care of her husband’s body, including his severed head, after his execution on February 24, 1716, by giving her the opportunity to cut off strands of his hair as a keepsake.

“This embroidered sheet is an unusual item that would take months or years to create,” said Beverly Cook, curator at the Museum of London.

“Care and devotion speak to Anna’s personal devastation and remarkable character as she is determined to protect her husband’s memory long after his death.

“This is just one of the many personal stories in the exhibit, revealing the impact public executions have had on the lives of Londoners over the centuries – a city that has witnessed the brutal deaths of so many people, from ordinary Londoners to the most notorious cases in history. .’

The bed sheet went through several generations of activists and supporters over the years before eventually finding its way into private collections.

It was acquired by the London Museum in 1934, but has never been exhibited before.

Experts say this speaks not only to the young widow’s personal grief and devotion, but also to her role in preserving her husband’s memory among Catholics seeking to restore the Stuart dynasty.

The 1715 rebellion is generally considered to be the first Jacobite rising, but in fact the entire movement can be traced back to the deposition of the Catholic King James II in the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

Concerned about the existence of a Catholic dynasty, British Protestants turned to James’ son-in-law William of Orange, who led a successful invasion of England.

James panicked and fled to France, where the English Parliament replaced him with William and his wife Queen Mary, James’ Protestant daughter.

This was a landmark event in the history of the Whigs (opponents of Catholic succession) in Britain.

James then attempted to regain the throne, effectively becoming the first Jacobite to rise in 1689.

This led to violence in Ireland, where James’s supporters (mostly Catholics) were finally defeated at the Battle of the Boyne, and in Scotland, where, despite the victory at Killikrunky, the military conflict was inconclusive.

The Scottish Parliament agreed to accept William as their king in favor of James.

Further challenges to the British throne were made in 1708, 1715 and 1719.

Considered the first Jacobite rising, the 1715 rising was unlike any other rising since Killikrunk.

This was the only time that a major uprising also broke out in England – in strongly Catholic Lancashire – but again ended in the defeat of the movement.

After the death of James II of England and VII of Scotland in 1701, King Louis XIV of France recognized his son as James III and VIII, King of England, Scotland and Ireland.

However, this was not a title recognized by King William and after the failure of the 1715 rebellion, the death of Louis XIV and the Treaty of Utrecht between Britain and France, James was forced to leave France and settle in Rome in 1719.

The following year, his son Charles Edward Stuart, nicknamed “Handsome Prince Charlie”, was born there.

Handsome Prince Charlie led the Jacobite rising of 1745, which marked a turning point in British history.

Believing that the British throne was his birthright, he planned to invade Britain with his Jacobite followers and overthrow the Hanoverian “usurper” George II.

Charles launched an uprising on 19 August 1745 at Glenfinnan in Scotland and successfully captured Edinburgh.

In November, Charles’s army crossed the frontier and captured Carlisle, then moved south across Lancashire in the hope of enlisting British support.

The third Earl of Derwentwater and grandson of Charles II, James Radcliffe (pictured with his wife Anne Mary) was executed for his part in the first Jacobite rising.

The third Earl of Derwentwater and grandson of Charles II, James Radcliffe (pictured with his wife Anne Mary) was executed for his part in the first Jacobite rising.

The sheet will be part of the Execution exhibition at the London Docks Museum (pictured), which opens in October.

The sheet will be part of the Execution exhibition at the London Docks Museum (pictured), which opens in October.

At the time, most of the British army was fighting on the Continent in the War of the Austrian Succession, so the government initially had to rely on inexperienced troops.

Charles made it to Derby, but many battle-hardened regiments were brought back from the Continent to deal with the crisis, eventually forcing him to retreat.

This was partly because few Englishmen joined him, and the French invasion he had hoped for did not take place.

The retreat eventually led to the Battle of Culloden which was the final stand of the Jacobite rising in 1745.

Over 1,200 people were killed in just an hour as the Jacobite forces engaged in a final stand, ending in a brutal and bloody defeat.

Charles was forced to make a dramatic escape to France, but his fleeing soldiers were ruthlessly hunted down and killed.

He lived for another 42 years after the Battle of Culloden in 1746, but was never able to garner support for any further attempt to claim the throne.

The sheet will be part of the Execution exhibition at the London Docks Museum, which opens in October.

Ascension of Bonnie Prince Charlie to the throne

Charles Edward Stuart, also known as

Charles Edward Stuart, also known as “Handsome Prince Charlie”, was the grandson of the deposed Catholic King James II.

Charles Edward Stuart, or “Handsome Prince Charlie”, was the grandson of the deposed Catholic King James II, who fled to France from the invading army of William of Orange in 1688.

Supporters of the deposed king and his descendants were called “Jacobites”, whose main stronghold was the Highlands and the Isles of Scotland.

Handsome Prince Charlie became a cult figure for the Scots after the Jacobite rising in 1745, when he tried to seize the throne of England by force, but ended in his defeat at the Battle of Culloden.

Alexander Murray did not take part in the Jacobite rising of 1745. But in 1752, Murray was accused of misconduct during the election at Westminster.

While in the House of Commons and ordered to kneel to pass sentence, Murray refused, saying “Sir, I beg your pardon; I never kneel except before God’

He was then imprisoned until the end of the meeting, and after his release he was taken to the house of Lord Elibank, where the Elibank plot was started.

The Jacobite rising of 1745 was a turning point in British history.  Believing that the British throne was his birthright, Charles Edward Stewart, also known as

The Jacobite rising of 1745 was a turning point in British history. Believing that the British throne was his birthright, Charles Edward Stewart, also known as “Handsome Prince Charlie”, planned to invade Britain along with his Jacobite followers.

The plan was to kidnap King George II and other members of the royal family on November 10, 1752, and place them on a boat on the Thames bound for France.

The security system at St. James’s Palace was analyzed, and two or three hundred people were chosen to meet at Westminster, although to avoid suspicion they settled in different properties.

On the night the king is kidnapped, they will meet at prearranged locations: St. James is captured, the gates of the Tower of London are opened, the guards are broken, and the royal family is smuggled into France.

However, the plot failed partly because Murray and his co-conspirators were able to muster the courage to carry it out, and partly because every detail of the plot was revealed to the British ministers by a spy who kept them informed of all the Jacobite movements that caught his attention during the war. period.

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