Levi's CEO Jennifer Sey reveals she was fired for speaking out against COVID measures

Levi’s CEO Jennifer Sey reveals she was fired for speaking out against COVID measures

Jennifer Sey, 52, has repeatedly spoken out against school closures and the mandatory wearing of masks since the start of the pandemic.

Jennifer Sey, 52, has repeatedly spoken out against school closures and the mandatory wearing of masks since the start of the pandemic.

Jennifer Sey, a former U.S. gymnast and president of the Levi’s brand, has revealed that she was fired for repeatedly speaking out against draconian COVID restrictions in schools and turned down a $1 million severance package she was offered on the condition that she not be in public. share why she was kicked out.

Sei, 52, has repeatedly spoken out against school closures and the mandatory wearing of masks since the start of the pandemic.

Last March, she moved her four children from California to Denver so they could attend classes in person and have a “normal childhood.”

But she now revealed that in the background, Levi’s employees pressured her not to share her opinion on the matter because they offended the company’s liberal preferences.

She stopped speaking in November after being told she was on her way to becoming the next CEO, but says she said last month it was “unacceptable” for her to stay because third-party detractors were putting pressure on her. to the company to fire her.

“Last month, the CEO told me that it was ‘unacceptable’ for me to stay. I was offered a $1 million severance package but I knew I would have to sign a non-disclosure agreement on why I was kicked out,” Sey wrote on Monday on Common Sense Substack Bari Weiss.

She said she turned down the money and completed her exit from the company yesterday.

“Money would be very helpful. But I just can’t do it. Sorry Lewis.

“I never intended to be nasty. I don’t like to fight. I love Levi’s and its place in American heritage as a purveyor of durable trousers to the hard-working, courageous people who moved to the West and dreamed of gold buried in the dirt.

But now the corporation does not believe in it.

“He fell into the trap of trying to please the mafia and silence any dissent within the organization. In this, it is like many other American companies: it is held hostage by intolerant ideologues who do not believe in true inclusion or diversity.

Sei (center) is pictured in 1986 when she traveled to Moscow to compete for America in the Goodwill Games.  She said she was proud to have worn her Levi's jeans, which represented America's freedom, in the Soviet Union, but now the company has abandoned those values.

Sei (center) is pictured in 1986 when she traveled to Moscow to compete for America in the Goodwill Games. She said she was proud to have worn her Levi’s jeans, which represented America’s freedom, in the Soviet Union, but now the company has abandoned those values.

When the pandemic hit, Sei was quick to criticize school closures.  Last March, she moved from California to Denver so her younger children could attend kindergarten.

When the pandemic hit, Sei was quick to criticize school closures. Last March, she moved from California to Denver so her younger children could attend kindergarten.

Sei has four children from two marriages.  She says she was labeled

Sei has four children from two marriages. She says she was labeled “racist” by her colleagues at Levi’s – even though two of her sons are black – for her views on school lockdowns.

Sei says Levi's CEO Charles Berg told her it was

Sei says Levi’s CEO Charles Berg told her it was “unacceptable” to stay with the company.

“I will always wear my old 501s. But today I trade my work at Levi’s. In return, I can keep my voice.”

Sei says she was labeled a “racist” and told she was not “ally” with the black community.

“After all these years, the company I love has lost sight of the values ​​that made people all over the world wear Levi’s.

“At the beginning of the pandemic, I publicly asked whether schools should be closed.

“It didn’t seem controversial to me. I felt—and still believe—that draconian policies would hurt the most for those least at risk, and the burden would fall the heaviest on disadvantaged children in public schools, who need security and school routine the most.

“In the summer of 2020, I finally received a call. “You know, when you speak, you speak for the company,” our head of corporate communications told me, urging me to be quiet.

“I replied, ‘My title is not in my Twitter biography. I speak as a mother of four public school children.”

“But the calls kept coming. From legal From the personnel department. From a board member.

“And finally, from my boss, the CEO of the company,” she wrote in a letter on Monday.

Sei said that while her colleagues were allowed to publicly criticize Trump, she was warned for speaking on the FOX news about school closures.

Sei's profile is still on the Levi's website.  The company has not yet commented on her departure or her claims.

Sei’s profile is still on the Levi’s website. The company has not yet commented on her departure or her claims.

“I refused to end the conversation. I continued to denounce hypocritical and unsubstantiated politics, met with the mayor’s office, and eventually uprooted my entire life in California – I lived there for over 30 years – so that my kindergartener could finally experience a real school.

“The national media picked up our story and I was asked to go on the Laura Ingram show on Fox News. This appearance was the last straw.”

Sei said she was being groomed for the position, but the company’s CEO, Charles W. Berg, told her she had to stop talking about mandates if she wanted to take on the role.

“In the fall of 2021, during a dinner with the CEO, I was told that I was on my way to becoming the next CEO of Levi’s — under my leadership, the share price had doubled and revenue had returned to pre-pandemic levels.

“The only thing that stood in my way,” he said, “is myself. All I had to do was stop talking about school.”

Sei stopped talking, but she was constantly attacked on social media by people demanding her head.

“Every day, a dossier of my tweets and all my online interactions was sent to the CEO by the head of corporate communications.

“In one of my executive management meetings, the CEO casually remarked that I was ‘acting like Donald Trump. I felt embarrassed and turned off the camera to get myself together,” she wrote.

Levi’s has not commented on her departure. Her biography is still on the company’s website.

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