IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards

IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards

The International Olympic Committee has rejected American athlete Shakarri Richardson’s allegations of racist double standards in her anti-doping case and that of Russian prodigy Kamila Valieva.

Earlier this week, 15-year-old Valieva was given a reprieve to continue competing in Beijing 2022 and take the lead in today’s final day of women’s figure skating.

While ‘Miss Perfect’ Valieva tested positive for the banned angina drug trimetazidine last December, and her test also included two legal heart drugs, hypoxen and L-carnitine, Richardson was barred from the Olympics in Tokyo for marijuana rap. .

Richardson said: “Can we get a clear answer about the difference between her situation and the mines? My mother died and I can’t run and also finished third. The only difference I can see is that I’m a black young lady.”

Shakarri Richardson criticized the decision to allow Kamila Valieva to compete in Beijing

Shakarri Richardson criticized the decision to allow Kamila Valieva to compete in Beijing

Richardson (left) suggested she had a double standard after she was unable to compete in the Tokyo Olympics after testing positive for marijuana.

Richardson (left) suggested she had a double standard after she was unable to compete in the Tokyo Olympics after testing positive for marijuana.

Prior to the Winter Olympics, Valieva tested positive for the angina drug trimetazidine but was allowed to compete pending an investigation and ruling on her case.

Prior to the Winter Olympics, Valieva tested positive for the angina drug trimetazidine but was allowed to compete pending an investigation and ruling on her case.

A 15-year-old girl was found to have two legal and one illegal substances in her body, which experts say could improve her performance.

A 15-year-old girl was found to have two legal and one illegal substances in her body, which experts say could improve her performance.

“It’s all about the skin,” she tweeted on Monday morning. “By the way, THC definitely doesn’t improve performance!!!!”

“Failure in December and the world only now knows, however my result was published within a week and my talent and name were given to the people.”

She continued, “No BLACK athlete was going to compete on the case, I don’t care what they say!!!”

The representative of the IOC replied: “You can’t talk about double standards in relation to Russian and American athletes, each case is individual.

“Richardson’s positive doping test was discovered on June 19, and the result was received before the start of the Olympics. She was suspended for a month. There is nothing in common between these two cases.”

“These games, which have not ended, deal with the issue in December. She is at the center of much speculation. It must be very difficult for her.

“Of course we keep in touch with the team, their well-being is the team’s top priority and obviously we care a lot about that, but there’s not much we can do.”

IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards IOC strikes back at US sprinter Shakarri Richardson after she accuses them of double standards

The IOC says that if she wins today, an asterisk will appear next to Valieva’s name as she has not yet held a hearing to determine her innocence or guilt of doping.

Her doping test results went unquestioned until she won the Russian Olympic Committee gold in the team event this month.

But the IOC also noted that a 15-year-old is a “protected person”; different rules apply to minors.

Richardson won gold in the women’s 100 meters in Tokyo after her record breaking race.

The 21-year-old explained that she turned to marijuana while trying to cope with the “emotional panic” after learning of her birth mother’s death during a media appearance days before her Olympic trials. Marijuana is banned by the IOC but legal in Washington State, where Richardson dabbled in the drug.

Last year, she was suspended from the sport for a month and not allowed to participate in the Olympics. Her suspension drew much criticism and has since sparked accusations of racism compared to Valieva.

Noting Valieva’s doping results, Travis Tygart, executive director of the US Anti-Doping Agency, told the NYTimes: “It’s a triple substance – two of which are allowed and one is prohibited. [They] appear to be aimed at increasing endurance, reducing fatigue, and increasing oxygen efficiency.”

Russian and Olympic officials have suggested that Valieva’s presence of trimetazidine may have been a mistake, but other officials have argued that it is highly unusual.

Her mother and Russian officials explained that she may have tested positive for the drug after she shared a drinking cup with her grandfather, who was prescribed the drug and accompanies the young athlete to training most of the days.

Valieva competed in the free skate on Tuesday, scoring 82.16 points, her lowest score of the season. But the disappointing result was still enough to put her in first place, ahead of compatriot from Russia Anna Shcherbakova.

The young superstar figure skater helped her team take first place in the team standings, beating out the nine-man U.S. team. The IOC reportedly offered American athletes Olympic torches as replacement gifts until Valieva’s status in the competition was determined.

IOC President Thomas Bach presented the Olympic torch at a private meeting with figure skaters in Beijing, confirming that no medal ceremonies involving Valieva would take place until her scandal was resolved, the Associated Press reported.

In her only public comment so far, Valieva told the Russian state-run Channel One on Monday evening that “these days have been very difficult for me. I’m happy, but I’m tired emotionally.” However, she will have to attend a press conference if she finishes in the top three on Thursday night.

The Russian figure skater plans to succeed in her free skate, staged to Bolero by early 20th-century French composer Maurice Ravel. The leader of the Russian national team “Quadruple Squad” is trying to perform three jumps from four revolutions: a quadruple salchow in the first jump pass, a combination of a quadruple toe loop-triple toe loop and a combination of a quadruple toe loop-triple salchow.

Valieva’s program has the highest base value, by far, of anyone in the field, meaning she would have to miss a few hops and have uncharacteristically poor performance to rank anywhere but first.

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