IBM executives forced older employees to give way to younger ones

IBM executives forced older employees to give way to younger ones

‘Let’s Make Dinosaurs Extinct’: IBM Emails Show Executives Forced Older Workers To Make Way For Younger Workers To Boost ‘Digital Natives’

  • Hundreds of former IBM employees sued for age discrimination
  • A company executive allegedly referred to older employees as “dinosaurs” supposed to be an “extinct species” in an email cited in court documents.
  • Another said the company’s “legacy maternal workforce” “needs to change”, writing that they are “not digital natives”. The real threat to us
  • A spokesman denied that IBM resorted to massive age discrimination, noting that 37% of the company’s new hires since 2010 were over 40 years old.
  • The average age of the company’s employees in 2020 was 48, the company said, and has not changed since 2010.
  • But in 2019, IBM laid off 100,000 older employees, according to court testimony from Alan Wild, a former vice president of human resources.
  • Between 2013 and 2018, older employees accounted for 60 percent of job cuts, according to ProPublica.

According to court documents, IBM is facing an age discrimination lawsuit for laying off hundreds of older employees, calling them “dinosaurs” supposed to be “extinct species” in favor of younger “digital natives”.

The lawsuit, filed by attorney Shannon Liss-Riordan, who represents hundreds of former IBM employees over “age-related animosity from senior IBM officials,” alleges unnamed executives were aware of “a company-wide plan to lay off older employees to make room for younger ones.” employees.’

“IBM is engaged in blatant age discrimination,” Liss-Riordan said in an interview Friday. “IBM tried to use arbitration clauses to hide this evidence from the public and other employees who are trying to create their own cases of discrimination.”

While the case was filed in the US District Court for the Southern District of New York last July, the company has faced a number of similar lawsuits in recent years.

In an undated email thread cited in the document, a senior IBM executive, whose name has been redacted, allegedly detailed a plan to “accelerate change by inviting ‘dinosaurs’ (new species) to leave” to make room for younger employees.

On another occasion, another unnamed executive said that IBM’s “outdated maternal workforce” was something that “needed to change” at the company, writing that “they don’t really understand social media or interaction.” Not digital natives. A real threat to us,” the statement said.

IBM is facing age discrimination lawsuit for ousting hundreds of older employees, calling them

IBM is facing age discrimination lawsuit for ousting hundreds of older employees, calling them “dinosaurs” supposed to be “extinct species” in favor of younger “digital natives”.

A lawsuit filed by attorney Shannon Liss-Riordan (pictured), who represents hundreds of former IBM employees for

A lawsuit filed by attorney Shannon Liss-Riordan (pictured), who represents hundreds of former IBM employees for “dislike of the age of senior IBM officials,” alleges that unnamed executives were aware of a “corporate-wide plan to lay off older employees in order to room for young employees”

Another unnamed executive, according to court documents, expressed “disappointment that the share of millennial employees at IBM is much lower than at a competitor firm.”

IBM’s chief human resources officer Nickle Lamoreau said in an email that he denied the company systematically discriminated against older employees and said it fired employees who filed a class action lawsuit due to changing business conditions.

The blue-chip technology company employed 346,000 people as of 2020, according to Statistica.

In 2020, the median age of IBM employees in the US was 48 years old, the statement said, which has not changed since 2010. Lamoreaux also noted that 37 percent of the company’s new hires since 2010 have been over 40.

The wording cited in the court documents, the spokesman wrote, was “not who they were” and “is not in line with the respect that IBM has for its employees and, as the facts clearly show, it does not reflect the company’s practices or policies.”

According to former vice president Alan Wild’s testimony in 2019, IBM laid off up to 100,000 older employees to show millennials that the company was a “cool, hip organization” and not a “shoddy old organization.” human resources, according to Bloomberg.

Between 2013 and 2018, older employees accounted for 60 percent of job cuts, according to ProPublica.

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