Human hand and three placentas sent from Brazil to Singapore for fashion designer clothes

Human hand and three placentas sent from Brazil to Singapore for fashion designer clothes

A human hand and three placentas were shipped from Brazil to Singapore so a fashion designer could turn them into CLOTHING and accessories.

  • Human hand and three placentas sent from Brazil to Singapore
  • They were “for the fashion designer to turn into clothes and accessories”.
  • Indonesian designer Arnold Putra is known for creating clothes from body parts.
  • Last week, police raided the home of anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta in Manaus, who is suspected of organ trafficking.

It is believed that the human hand and three placentas were sent from Brazil to Singapore so that a fashion designer could turn them into clothes and accessories.

The organs were sent to Indonesian designer Arnold Putra, whose controversial designs include a handbag made from a child’s spine.

Last week, police raided the home of Helder Binda Pimenta, an anatomy professor at the University of Amazonas (UEA) in Manaus, who is suspected of organ trafficking.

Last week, Brazilian police raided the home of an anatomy professor after reports of possible human trafficking.

Last week, Brazilian police raided the home of an anatomy professor after reports of possible human trafficking.

Fashion designer Arnold Putra (pictured) denied involvement in human trafficking.

Fashion designer Arnold Putra (pictured) denied involvement in human trafficking.

The Brazilian Federal Police said: “According to the investigation, the defendants sent plastinated human organs to Singapore.

“Plastination is a modern technical process for the preservation of biological material, which mainly consists of the removal of bodily fluids (water and fixative solutions) and fats by chemical methods, replacing them with plastic resins such as silicone, polyester and epoxy, resulting in dry, odorless and durable fabrics.

The authorities had already left Brazil and were on their way to Singapore, although it is not clear if the police intercepted the package.

Amazonas State University (UEA) anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta (pictured) is suspected of supplying organs

Amazonas State University (UEA) anatomy professor Helder Binda Pimenta (pictured) is suspected of supplying organs

If his guilt is proven, the professor faces up to eight years in prison in Brazil.

If his guilt is proven, the professor faces up to eight years in prison in Brazil.

Brazilian police carried out raids in Manaus, in the northwest of the country.

Brazilian police carried out raids in Manaus, in the northwest of the country.

Arnold Poultre's handbag, made from a child's spine.  The designer claims his spooky product is

Arnold Poultre’s handbag, made from a child’s spine. The designer claims his spooky product is “ethically sourced” from medical surplus in Canada.

Made in Los Angeles, the

Made in Los Angeles, the “disposable bag” was positioned as “the perfect eye-catching accessory.”

Fashion designer Mr. Putra denied that he was involved in human trafficking.

He also defended his spine bag as “a work of art” and said previous reports that he received indigenous bones and organs for his clothing and accessories were false.

Meanwhile, the UEA said, “The Chancellor of the University of Amazonas complied with the court’s order and decided to launch an investigation to ascertain the facts and responsibility.”

If Professor Binda’s guilt is proven, he will spend up to eight years in prison.

History of organ trafficking around the world

The first reports of commercial trade in human organs date back to the 1980s and involve the sale of kidneys by poor Indian citizens to foreign patients, especially from the Middle East.

It was reported that about 80% of all kidneys purchased for transplantation in Indian hospitals were transplanted to patients from the Gulf countries, as well as from Malaysia and Singapore.

Early evidence of EU citizens traveling abroad to receive organs was presented in an article in the British Medical Journal in 1996, which described that two German patients had died of post-transplant complications after transplantation in India.

At least 25 German patients were said to have received kidneys abroad.

In Europe, the Council of Europe and the European Union, through the European Parliament, are actively developing new strategies to combat and prevent what is now considered a criminal offense on a global scale.

There have been reports in the media that human trafficking, including for the purpose of harvesting organs, may increase in Europe due to the economic and financial crisis.

There has been a documented increase in organ offerings via the Internet and newspaper advertising, especially in Southern Europe and Russia.

Serious but as yet unconfirmed reports have been circulating recently about the alleged trade in the organs of refugees in the Syrian conflict and their supply on the Lebanese and Turkish “black market” of organs.

Other worrying reports point to the relocation of organ trafficking operations to Latin American countries.

Source: European Union.

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