How the world press covered Russia's invasion of Ukraine

How the world press covered Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

“Putin declares WAR”, “from Russia with hatred” and “unthinkable”: how the world press covered Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

  • Newspapers from around the world have sharply assessed Putin’s actions
  • The images ranged from destroyed buildings to the faces of locally affected people.
  • It comes amid fears that Russian troops will arrive in the Ukrainian capital Kiev today.

The war in Ukraine hit the front pages of newspapers around the world, and many of them denounced Vladimir Putin’s act of aggression.

The tone of the reaction was one of shock and desperation, as the powerful images ranged from the visible destruction of bombs and rockets fired to the faces of injured locals.

Eastern countries were the first to go to the press: The Bangkok Post compared Russia’s actions to Nazi Germany, and the New Zealand Herald declared the Kremlin’s strikes to be “the darkest moment in Europe since World War II,” accompanied by a striking image of a mushroom cloud rising over the Ukrainian sky.

Eastern countries hit the press first, with the Bangkok Post comparing Russia's actions to Nazi Germany. The New Zealand Herald called the Kremlin's strikes

Eastern countries hit the press first, with the Bangkok Post comparing Russia’s actions to Nazi Germany (left), and the New Zealand Herald declaring the Kremlin’s strikes “the darkest moment in Europe since World War II,” accompanied by a striking mushroom cloud image. rises above the Ukrainian sky (right)

Australia and The Daily Telegraph described the attack as The Sydney Morning Herald also reported on the bombing of the city.

Australia and its Daily Telegraph described the attack as “from Russia with hate” and accused the president of spouting “television lies” (left), while the Sydney Morning Herald also reported on the city’s bombing (right).

The French newspaper Liberation simply used the term In Spain, El Pais focused on depicting a grieving Ukrainian after the Kharkiv attack.

The French newspaper Liberation simply used the term “L’Impensable”, which translates to “unthinkable” (left), while Spain’s El Pais focused on the image of a Ukrainian grieving after the Kharkiv attack (right).

The New York Post published a photo of one of the many bombings with a simple headline: Many newspapers, including Germany's Nd Der Tag, used the photograph of Yelena Kurilo, whose blood-covered face has become an iconic image of the invasion.

The New York Post published a photo of one of the many explosions using a simple headline: “War in Europe” (left), while many newspapers, including Germany’s Nd Der Tag, used a photo of Yelena Kurilo, whose bloodied face has become an iconic image . invasions (right)

Neighboring Australia and its Daily Telegraph described the attack as “from Russia with hate” and accused the president of spouting “television lies”, with the Sydney Morning Herald also reporting the city’s bombing.

The French newspaper Liberation simply used the term “L’Impensable”, which translates to “the unthinkable”.

In Spain, El Pais focused on an image of a Ukrainian grieving after a terrorist attack in Kharkiv, and the New York Post published one of the many bombings using a simple headline: “War in Europe.”

Many newspapers, including the Sydney Morning Herald and Germany’s Nd Der Tag, as well as today’s Daily Mail, used the photo of Yelena Kurilo, whose bloodied face has become an iconic image of the invasion.

Yesterday, she vowed to “do everything for her homeland” after surviving a Russian missile attack.

It comes amid fears that Russian troops will arrive in Kiev today and are now fighting on the outskirts of the city as US intelligence warned of a plan to seize the airport, bring in troops and “behead” the government.

Anton Gerashchenko, an adviser to the country’s interior minister, said Friday would be the “toughest day” of the war as Russian armor advances from Chernigov, northeast of the capital, and Ivankov, to the northwest, in an attempt to encircle the city, where President Volodymyr Zelensky is still in hiding.

Ukrainian forces blew up several bridges leading into the capital early in the morning to try to slow down the assault.

The US warned that tanks were fighting Ukrainian troops 20 miles outside the city early Friday morning, before clashes were reported in the northern area just hours later.

Apparently, the fighting took place in Obolon, and the Ministry of Defense encouraged residents to make Molotov cocktails to throw at Russian tanks. Russian forces were also reported to be in the nearby areas of Vorzel, Bucha, Irpin.

Witnesses then reported seeing Ukrainian soldiers armed with machine guns and rocket launchers take up defensive positions on street corners, even in the center of the capital.

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