Hawley says Biden 'encouraged' Putin to do 'whatever he wants' by shutting down US energy

Hawley says Biden ‘encouraged’ Putin to do ‘whatever he wants’ by shutting down US energy

Senator Josh Hawley said it’s not surprising that Vladimir Putin feels daring to attack Ukraine because President Biden has “shut down” US energy production and given the green light to Russian.

‘He [Biden] shuts down energy production in America and gives the green light to energy production in Russia,” the Missouri Republican said at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando on Thursday.

“Is it any wonder, is it any wonder that Vladimir Putin feels the courage to do what the hell he wants to do?”

The senator urged Biden to resign.

Upon taking office, Biden shut down U.S. energy-producing projects like the Keystone pipeline and lifted sanctions on the Nord Stream II gas pipeline, which brings gas from Russia to Germany.

At the time, Biden lifted the sanctions as a diplomatic service to Germany, arguing that the pipeline was 98% complete anyway. He reimposed sanctions this week as the Russian president launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

“Is it any wonder that China feels the courage to do everything for which it has to pay when we have a president who does not believe in American strength? Who doesn’t believe in American energy, who doesn’t believe in American jobs, and who has no idea about the priorities and issues that threaten this country?”

While Biden was attacking Putin, CPAC Republicans spent a lot of time criticizing the US President.

“We are the number one energy producing nation in the world, we should be Joe Biden and it’s time to bring that back,” Hawley said.

Senator Josh Hawley called on Biden to resign in his CPAC speech.

Senator Josh Hawley called on Biden to resign in his CPAC speech.

“If you want to send a message to Vladimir Putin, here is a message for him: we will be the ones to supply the world with oil and gas, who will shut down your energy sector.”

And while Hawley doesn’t think Biden isn’t tough enough on Putin’s energy sector, he represents one side of the split in the Republican Party that doesn’t think the US should interfere in the region.

Hawley called Biden’s foreign policy approach “haphazard” and “helpless” but stressed, “We don’t need American soldiers fighting in Europe,” in an interview with the Daily Signal.

The 42-year-old senator has said he won’t “wait to see what Joe Biden does” and plans to pass legislation opening up US energy production.

“We’re going to open it like you’ve never seen it before,” he told the cheering crowd.

“It’s time to let a good, strong American worker go out there and start drilling for oil, start exploring for natural gas. Start driving again, let them do what we do best – show America, show the world the strength of this nation, get America back to work, open up American energy,” Hawley said.

South Dakota Gov. Christy Noem seemed to agree.

“A strong American president who puts his citizens first will take these six actions right now,” she tweeted, followed by a series of demands including restarting the Keystone pipeline, opening up federal land to natural gas drilling and exploration, and imposing tough sanctions. on energy in Russia.

Donald Trump’s energy independence policy has kept Vladimir Putin in check, according to former president’s deputy national security adviser C. T. McFarland, who said Thursday that President Joe Biden should have imposed sanctions on the Russian oil and gas industry following his invasion Ukraine.

McFarland said she deliberately chose yellow — one of the colors of the Ukrainian flag — when she appeared at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida.

After dozens of Republicans accused Biden of being weak for failing to prevent Putin’s attack, McFarland said Trump’s energy policy helped curb Russian aggression.

“If oil is $40 a barrel, as it was when President Trump left office, the Russians are broke,” she said.

“They cannot afford war. War is expensive.”

C. T. McFarland, deputy national security adviser in the Trump White House for four months, said the former president's energy independence policy was holding back Putin.

C. T. McFarland, deputy national security adviser in the Trump White House for four months, said the former president’s energy independence policy was holding back Putin.

Former President Donald Trump President Vladimir Putin of Ukraine

McFarland said oil was $40 a barrel when Trump left office. But since then, it has skyrocketed, filling Vladimir Putin’s coffers and funding his war machine.

In this publicity photo, taken from a video released by the press service of the Ukrainian Police Department, military helicopters, apparently Russian, fly over the outskirts of Kiev, Ukraine.

In this publicity photo, taken from a video released by the press service of the Ukrainian Police Department, military helicopters, apparently Russian, fly over the outskirts of Kiev, Ukraine.

In the Glukhov area, the Ukrainian military fired at an armored column of 15 T-72 tanks with American Javelin missiles.

In the Glukhov area, the Ukrainian military fired at an armored column of 15 T-72 tanks with American Javelin missiles.

Moscow, the world’s largest supplier of natural gas and one of the world’s largest oil producers, could only “play big” on the world stage if energy prices were high, she said.

According to her, Biden immediately changed Trump’s policy.

“So he immediately shut down the American energy industry, oil and natural gas, energy that we exported to other countries, which also stopped, what happened, the price of oil skyrocketed,” she said.

“Vladimir Putin is rich, he chooses when to invade.”

McFarland was deputy national security adviser during the first four months of the Trump administration.

She initially served under Mike Flynn and was asked to resign after he was fired for not disclosing conversations with the Russian ambassador in Washington.

She said Biden’s sanctions won’t hit Putin where it hurts – in the oil and gas industry.

Her words added liveliness to Republicans’ cries that Biden was to blame, but Democrats countered, saying Trump’s cozy relationship with Putin meant he wouldn’t rein him in.

She spoke as Ukrainian troops fought Russian invaders from three sides after Moscow launched land, sea and air offensives that forced tens of thousands of people to flee their homes.

Republicans lined up to accuse Biden of being weak.

“When we pray for the Ukrainian people, make no mistake: this is what happens when America’s enemies see a weak and incompetent @POTUS,” US Rep. Scott Perry tweeted, adding the hashtag Bidenisafailure.

Republicans in the House of Representatives said, “President Biden’s weakness on the world stage has emboldened our enemies. China, Iran and North Korea are watching.”

Matt Schlapp, who leads the CPAC organization and is a leading conservative voice, said the Russia-Ukraine issue will be a key topic for the next four days.

The attack hit Ukraine on all fronts with bombs and rockets dropped on targets across the country in the early hours, followed by troop strikes from Crimea, Donbass, Belgorod and Belarus, and helicopter landings in Kiev and power stations on the Dnieper.  Chernobyl nuclear power plant also fell to Russian troops

The attack hit Ukraine on all fronts with bombs and rockets dropped on targets across the country in the early hours, followed by troop strikes from Crimea, Donbass, Belgorod and Belarus, and helicopter landings in Kiev and power stations on the Dnieper. Chernobyl nuclear power plant also fell to Russian troops

Russian combat helicopter Ka-52 in the field after an emergency landing Kiev, Ukraine

Russian combat helicopter Ka-52 in the field after an emergency landing Kiev, Ukraine

He said there were divisions between the party coalition spread.

— You know, Liz Cheney’s wing in the Republican Party. is becoming increasingly marginalized and discredited,” he told . “So this makes people say in different voices: well, you know, if you are not a military expert, do you think we should use the power of America, its treasure, to intervene?

“And I would say that I think most people here would actually listen to the case to protect Ukraine, but the president has to do it.

“Somehow he has to go from this guy reading tips in the middle of the day to a president who speaks in prime time, including press conferences, about what he thinks we should be doing.”

Recent polls show little support for the US role in the conflict.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that only 22% of Republicans believe the US should play a major role in the conflict, compared to 32% of Democrats.

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