500-pound bear named Yogi, wreaked havoc on Lake Tahoe, divides residents

“Gentle” 500-pound black bear nicknamed Tank Hank is looking for his next meal in Lake Tahoe.

A giant bear nicknamed Tank Hank became famous in Lake Tahoe after being caught on camera rummaging for scraps, but one conservationist says he fears authorities will kill the huge animal instead of giving it a home.

Hank, who weighs 500 pounds, was caught on CCTV footage roaming Lake Tahoe homes looking for food that exceeded his appetite. The bear has been seen in the neighborhood more than 100 times since July, and nothing – not even loud noises, paintballs or stun guns – can scare him away.

Locals describe the animal as “gentle” and say it just eats and leaves without causing any problems. But wildlife officials say the locals made Hank too brazen by leaving unprotected food waste for him.

And now they fear that the bear, which is five times the size of a typical member of its species, could harm someone if it gets too close.

‘He doesn’t attack [people]. He doesn’t growl. He does not make rude faces,” insisted a local resident, according to TMZ.

However, not everyone likes a 500-pound teddy bear roaming the streets. California Department of Fish and Wildlife spokesman Peter Thira told The New York Times: “This is a bear that has lost all fear of humans. This is a potentially dangerous situation.

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Tank Hank, a 500-pound bear, terrorizes a community in Lake Tahoe, California.

Tank Hank, a 500-pound bear, terrorizes a community in Lake Tahoe, California.

Hank was caught on home security footage at Lake Tahoe while wandering around looking for his next meal.

Hank was caught on home security footage at Lake Tahoe while wandering around looking for his next meal.

Although Hank has not entered the house, he has done so in the past.  The bear has been seen more than 100 times in the area since July and has caused more than 150 calls to law enforcement.

Although Hank has not entered the house, he has done so in the past. The bear has been seen more than 100 times in the area since July and has caused more than 150 calls to law enforcement.

Local authorities are reportedly trying to capture the animal and send it to a nature reserve, but some conservationists fear that Hank will be killed before he can be brought to safety if he ends up confronting an aggressive person.

Wildlife officials tried to stem Hank’s tide of destruction by setting traps, but were unable to contain him.

“Trapping is a last resort for capturing and euthanizing a specific and what we call a heavily habituated or accustomed to human food black bear,” Tira said.

The residents were outraged by the bear hunt and even attempts to scare the bear away from the area by playing loud music or even spray-painting the phrase “Bear Killer” on the trap, even though Hank cannot read.

A pro-bear activist group, the “BEARS League”, partner with wildlife officials to try to get Hank back to a safe new home.

“The BEAR League contacted the director of a superb out-of-state wildlife sanctuary who agreed he had space and would be very willing to give this bear a permanent home,” said executive director Ann Bryant.

‘We notified [the California Department of Fish and Wildlife] on Tuesday morning asking them to seriously consider this option and not kill the bear.”

California wildlife authorities are facing multiple complaints from residents of the resort town of Lake Tahoe as the bear has caused more than 150 calls to law enforcement and wildlife personnel in the area recently.

“This individual bear has been linked to property damage to at least 38 different properties,” Tira told KCRA 3 in Sacramento Feb. 17.

Authorities add that the curvy cub caused “significant property damage and forcibly entered several homes, including occupied homes.”

The California home that faced Hank's wrath

The California home that faced Hank’s wrath

A pro-bear activist group, the

A pro-bear activist group, the “BEARS League”, partner with wildlife officials to try to get Hank back to a safe new home. This trap has been vandalized in an apparent attempt to keep Hank, even though he cannot read.

It’s not just Hank’s gigantic appetite that keeps him coming back, but the ease of access to the improperly guarded junk.

Bryant notes that shelters are not a permanent solution and wants Tahoe residents to practice prevention.

“Homeowners and visitors should do their part to keep bears out of trouble so they can live in the wild and in freedom,” she said.

“The various reasons bears get into trouble is because people do it and teach bears that it’s a good way to make a living.”

Residents were outraged by the bear hunt and even tried to scare the bear away from the area by playing loud music or even painting the phrase

Residents were outraged by the bear hunt and even tried to scare the bear away from the area by playing loud music or even painting the phrase “Bear Killer” on the trap.

The bear caused

The bear caused “significant property damage” and broke into several houses, including “occupied houses”.

This is another recent example of a bear attack on the West Coast.

An Oregon man committed suicide after accidentally shooting his brother while he was trying to defend himself from a black bear in his yard.

An unidentified man was loading his gun around 7 a.m. Feb. 8 when he “accidentally shot his brother,” the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office said.

Police found the man’s brother with gunshot wounds in an apartment building on the 2000 block of Placer Road in Sun Valley. After a “house check,” officers found the caller had “an alleged self-inflicted gunshot wound.”

“The caller is believed to have committed suicide after calling 911 to report an accidental shooting,” the police report said.

The investigation is ongoing and has been referred to the Oregon Medical Examiner’s Office.

The Josephine County Sheriff's Office answered a call in the 2000 Block of Placer Road Tuesday when a man called to say he

The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office answered a call in the 2000 Block of Placer Road Tuesday when a man called to say he “accidentally shot his brother” while trying to load a gun to protect them from a black bear on the road. property

Deputies found a self-inflicted gunshot wound on the property and believe

Deputies found a self-inflicted gunshot wound on the property and believe “the caller committed suicide,” the police report said.

The sheriff’s office told on Feb. 10 that “no further information is available” at this time.

Bear sightings are not uncommon in the state, which is home to between 25,000 and 30,000 black bears, according to the Josephine County Parks Department, which calls Oregon “black bear country.”

The Parks Department said bear attacks are “uncommon” and the animals usually “avoid human contact” but reminds the public that “it’s never safe to approach a bear.”

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