DR MARTIN SCARR: Medical advances plus mild symptoms spark optimism in queen's battle with Covid

DR MARTIN SCARR: Medical advances plus mild symptoms spark optimism in queen’s battle with Covid

Medical advances plus mild symptoms are cause for optimism in the Queen’s battle with Covid, writes Dr. MARTIN SCARR.

At first glance, the news that the Queen has tested positive for Covid may seem ominous. At 95, the monarch falls into the highest-risk category for exposure to the virus.

When it comes to the likelihood of developing severe illness, other important factors such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension are less important than advancing age – even with the milder Omicron variant currently responsible for the majority of cases in the UK today.

However, we know, unfortunately, that the coronavirus continues to be a threat to the elderly and vulnerable.

My guess is that the Queen was prescribed baricitinib, a powerful drug that has shown a very promising ability to turn off the potentially tissue-damaging inflammation that the virus can cause.

My guess is that the Queen was prescribed baricitinib, a powerful drug that has shown a very promising ability to turn off the potentially tissue-damaging inflammation that the virus can cause.

Adding to these concerns, the sovereign’s usually good health seems to have faltered of late. In October, she was hospitalized for two days for an unknown investigation. A month later, she sprained her back.

Photographed last week during her official engagement, she looked frail and told guests, “I can’t move.”

The Palace has confirmed that Her Majesty has received the triple vaccination.  However, it is also true that vaccines are less effective for older people who have weaker immune systems.

The Palace has confirmed that Her Majesty has received the triple vaccination. However, it is also true that vaccines are less effective for older people who have weaker immune systems.

The Palace has confirmed that Her Majesty has received the triple vaccination.

However, it is also true that vaccines are less effective for older people who have weaker immune systems.

All of this is a bit of a concern, and if I were the Queen’s therapist, I would listen to her chest twice a day to make sure she doesn’t develop pneumonia.

However, this rather grim news is balanced by Palace assurances that Her Majesty is currently experiencing only mild symptoms, allowing her to continue with lighter duties.

In addition, there have been many long-awaited advances in treatment.

My guess is that the Queen was prescribed baricitinib, a powerful drug that has shown a very promising ability to turn off the potentially tissue-damaging inflammation that the virus can cause.

The queen was also diagnosed just a week after the publication of a study on the antiviral drug molnupiravir.

This showed that if taken from the time of diagnosis, it could reduce the chance of a severe illness by as much as 50 percent.

However, timing is everything: if taken after symptoms worsen, it is much less effective. Prompt treatment will be vital. All of these are reasons for optimism.

Despite recent adversity, the Queen has been blessed with good health throughout her long life. She is now in safe hands and we all wish her a speedy recovery.

Martin Scarr is a columnist for Therapist and Wellness magazine.

Source link

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.