Dogs can only recognize their owner by their voice, study shows

Dogs can only recognize their owner by their voice, study shows

Dogs really are man’s best friend! Puppies can only recognize their owners by their voice, study shows

  • Until now, it was unclear whether dogs recognize voice or rely on smell and sight.
  • In the study, the dogs played hide-and-seek with their owner and a stranger.
  • Both the owner and the stranger read in a neutral tone, and the dog chose one
  • In 82% of cases, dogs chose the owner only by voice.

They have earned a reputation as “man’s best friend” and now a new study has confirmed that dogs do indeed have a special bond with their owners.

Researchers at the Eötvös Lorand University in Hungary found that dogs can only recognize their owners by their voice.

“This is the first demonstration that dogs can distinguish their owner’s voice from many others,” said Andiks Attila, who worked on the study.

“The study also shows that dogs use some, but only some, of the same vocal properties as humans to recognize who is speaking.”

Researchers at the Eötvös Lorand University in Hungary found that dogs can only recognize their owners by their voice.

Researchers at the Eötvös Lorand University in Hungary found that dogs can only recognize their owners by their voice.

Dogs have a special attachment to their owner’s VOICE.

Researchers in Hungary recently discovered that dogs are attached to their owner’s voice, which elicits reward-related brain responses in the puppy.

Surprisingly, this brain activity is similar to that of a newborn listening to its mother, indicating that the relationship between dog and owner and infant and mother is more similar than previously thought.

Martha Gaci, author of the study, said: “In dogs, just like babies, not only positive interaction with the caregiver, but even listening to their neutral voice is beneficial.”

Although previous research has shown that dogs can recognize their owners, it has not yet been clear whether they identify them by voice or rely on sight or smell.

To find out, the researchers invited 28 dogs and their owners to play the classic game of hide and seek in the lab.

The owner hid behind one of the two shelters, and the stranger hid behind the other.

From their hiding places, both the owner and the stranger would then read out the recipes in a neutral tone, and the dog was instructed to select one from a distance.

The game had several rounds with 14 different unfamiliar voices, including those more similar to the voice of the owner, and some others.

To make sure the scents didn’t help the dogs, for the last two rounds, the researchers played the owner’s voice from where the stranger was hiding, and vice versa.

The results showed that the dogs found their owner 82 percent of the time, including when the voices were reversed.

According to the team, this suggests that the dogs did not use their nose in the task, but instead could only recognize the voice.

Digging deeper into the results, the researchers also found what it was about owners’ voices that helped dogs choose them.

The researchers invited 28 dogs and their owners to play the classic game of hide and seek in the lab.  The owner hid behind one of the two shelters, and the strange one hid behind the other.

The researchers invited 28 dogs and their owners to play the classic game of hide and seek in the lab. The owner hid behind one of the two shelters, and the strange one hid behind the other.

They found that if the voice of the owner and the stranger were more different in pitch and noisiness, it helped the dogs recognize the voice of their owner.

However, the timbre and other sound properties have not changed.

“People mainly use three properties: pitch (higher or lower), noisiness (clearer or sharper), and timbre (brighter or darker) to distinguish others,” explained Anna Gabor, who led the study.

“Dogs can use the same voice properties or different ones.

“If two voices differ in a property that matters to dogs, the decisions should be simpler.”

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