Does espresso have grounds for a special status?

Does espresso have grounds for a special status?

Does espresso have grounds for a special status? The coffee shot should be kept in a protected place as it is part of a valuable social ritual, Italian officials say.

  • Italy demands espresso to receive global protected status
  • He says that a dark cup of coffee is a valuable social and cultural ritual.
  • It states that it should be included in the UNESCO World Intangible Heritage List.
  • Consists of non-physical intellectual wealth such as folklore, traditions and knowledge.

Italy requires espresso to receive global protection status.

It states that the dark serving of coffee is a valuable social and cultural ritual that should be included in the UNESCO World Intangible Heritage List.

It consists of non-physical intellectual wealth such as folklore, traditions and knowledge.

Countries are supposed to ensure that communities “create, maintain and transmit such a legacy”.

Italy already has truffle hunting and the art of making Neapolitan pizza. He must submit an application to the UN body by March 31.

Italy asks for global protection status for espresso (image)

Italy asks for global protection status for espresso (image)

Italians drink about 30 million espressos a day in china cups or small glasses, with or without a dash of milk, and see each shot as a gesture of friendship.

“Espresso is an excuse to tell a friend that you care,” says Massimiliano Rosati, owner of the Gambrinus cafe in Naples, which helped prepare the UNESCO World Intangible Heritage application.

According to the Italian Espresso Institute, to be authentic, espresso must have a “round, dense and velvety” taste and “hazelnut brown to dark brown head with yellowish brown undertones”.

Other Italian traditions and customs on the list include the Mediterranean diet and traditional violin-making craftsmanship in Cremona, the birthplace of Antonio Stradivari (file image).

Other Italian traditions and customs on the list include the Mediterranean diet and traditional violin-making craftsmanship in Cremona, the birthplace of Antonio Stradivari (file image).

It should have a lingering aroma with “notes of flowers, fruit, toasted bread and chocolate,” says the institute, created in 1998 to protect espresso.

The application for heritage status has been sent by the Ministry of Agriculture to the Italian National Commission for UNESCO, which must submit it to the headquarters of the UN body in Paris by March 31.

Other Italian traditions and customs on the list include the Mediterranean diet and traditional violin craftsmanship in Cremona, Antonio Stradivari’s birthplace.

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