Doctors develop new prostate cancer test that could prevent thousands of unnecessary procedures

Doctors develop new prostate cancer test that could prevent thousands of unnecessary procedures

New test to determine which types of prostate cancer are most dangerous could save thousands of men from unnecessary treatment

  • Currently, 20,000 men a year undergo unnecessary interventions for prostate cancer.
  • New method allows doctors to identify dangerous fast-growing prostate tumors
  • Some prostate tumors grow slowly and never cause problems.
  • According to doctors, the aggressiveness of the tumor is related to how much lactate it produces.

Doctors have developed a test that detects dangerous tumors of prostate cancer.

Modern techniques mean that it is incredibly difficult to differentiate between harmless and aggressive prostate tumors, especially at an early stage.

In some men, the tumor can be fatal, while in others it grows slowly and may never cause any problems.

As a result, up to 20,000 men a year undergo unnecessary surgery or radiation therapy.

Currently, doctors can determine the size of a tumor, but not its activity, by injecting a patient with a special solution and then performing an MRI.

A new test developed by the University of Cambridge could help thousands of men avoid unnecessary interventions for benign prostate tumors.

A new test developed by the University of Cambridge could help thousands of men avoid unnecessary interventions for benign prostate tumors.

But in the trial, researchers at the University of Cambridge attached a non-radioactive form of carbon called carbon-13 to a sugar-like molecule and injected it into a vein near the tumor.

They found that if carbon-13 lingers in the tumor, it indicates that large amounts of lactate are being produced, a sign that the cancer is aggressive.

Dr. Nikita Sushentsev, who participated in the study, said the breakthrough takes doctors one step closer to being able to “distinguish tigers from cats” in prostate cancer.

Approximately 52,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year in the UK, and approximately 30,000 of these have low-risk tumors.

The Daily Mail advocated urgent improvement in the treatment and diagnosis of prostate cancer.

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