Country music star John Rich compared teachers and librarians to pedophiles

Country music star John Rich compared teachers and librarians to pedophiles

Country music star John Rich compared teachers and librarians to pedophiles trying to kidnap children in vans at a Tennessee House legislative committee hearing on a controversial bill to ban “obscene books.”

“What is the difference between a teacher, an educator, or a librarian who puts one of these books, like you, on a student’s desk?” Rich asked lawmakers at a hearing in Nashville. “Or the guy in the white van pulls up to the edge of the school when school ends and says, ‘Come on guys, let me read you this book and show you these pictures?’

He continued, “What is the difference between these two scenarios? By the way, there is a difference. They can run away from the guy in the white van.

Several members nodded, apparently in agreement with the 48-year-old Rich.

The bill discussed at the hearing seeks to ban unspecified “obscene books” from public and charter schools and was sponsored by GOP state representative Scott Sepiki after a school district in the Volunteer State banned a book about the Holocaust.

Country star John Rich, 48, compared teachers and librarians to pedophiles trying to kidnap kids in vans at a Tennessee House legislative committee hearing on Wednesday.

Country star John Rich, 48, compared teachers and librarians to pedophiles trying to kidnap kids in vans at a Tennessee House legislative committee hearing on Wednesday.

Rich later reaffirmed his support for a controversial bill to ban

Rich later reaffirmed his support for a controversial bill to ban “obscene books”.

Rich, who famously urged women to

Rich, who famously urged women to “rescue horses, ride cowboys” in the lyrics of his 2004 song of the same name with Big Kenny, said that humans are “a firewall between tyranny and freedom.”

Y’all – in the Tennessee legislature today, testifying in support of @CepickyTn64’s censorship bill, singer @johnrich accused schools/librarians of “educating” children because some library books may discuss sexual content.

(Reminder: his big hit was Save a Horse, Ride a Cowboy 🤷🏻‍♂️) pic.twitter.com/KTVIiLoCxm

— Tennessee Holler (@TheTNHoller) February 24, 2022

The bill prohibits “the possession of obscene material by a local education agency; a public school, including a public charter school; or an employee or private contractor of a local education agency or public school if the obscene material is harmful to minors and is stored on public school premises.”

The bill was sponsored by State Republican Representative Scott Sepiki after a school district in the Volunteer State banned a book about the Holocaust.

The bill was sponsored by State Republican Representative Scott Sepiki after a school district in the Volunteer State banned a book about the Holocaust.

However, the initiative does not provide specific guidance on what is considered “obscene”.

Rich, who famously invited women to “rescue horses, ride cowboys” in the lyrics of his 2004 song of the same name with Big Kenny, later confirmed his stance on Twitter.

“Today, testifying before the legislative committee of the Tennessee House of Representatives was not easy. Some supported, some disagreed, but in our time it is necessary to go head to head with opponents,” he tweeted.

We must give them a fight. We the people are the firewall between tyranny and freedom.”

Hearings on the bill will continue on Wednesday.

Sepika’s bill was inspired by the McMinn County School Board’s decision in January to remove “Mouse” from its curriculum due to “inappropriate language” and the depiction of a female nude.

Art Spiegelman won a Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for a work that tells the story of his Jewish parents living in 1940s Poland and depicts him interviewing his father about his experiences as a Holocaust survivor.

In an interview, Spiegelman told CNBC he was “baffled” by the school board’s decision and called the action “Orwellian.”

“That leaves me with an open jaw, like, ‘What?’,” he said.

The bill, moved to the next week after Wednesday's hearing, does not provide specific guidance on what is considered

The bill, moved to the next week after Wednesday’s hearing, does not provide specific guidance on what is considered “obscene.”

In January, the McMinn County School Board removed the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus from its curriculum due to

In January, the McMinn County School Board removed the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus from its curriculum due to “unacceptable language” and an illustration of a nude woman.

School board meeting transcripts indicate objections to some of the language used in Maus.

At first, Principal Lee Parkison suggested that it be edited “to get rid of the eight swear words and the objectionable image of a woman.”

The naked woman is drawn in the form of a mouse. In the graphic novel, the Jews are drawn as mice and the Nazis as cats.

“It shows how they hang people, it shows how they kill children, why does the education system promote such things? It’s unwise and unhealthy,” school board member Tony Allman said of the book, which was part of the district’s eighth grade English curriculum.

Educational director Julie Goodin, a former history teacher, said she thought the graphic novel was a good way to depict a horrific event.

“It’s hard for this generation, these kids don’t even know about 9/11, they weren’t even born,” Goodin said. ‘

Art Spiegelman, author of Maus, the acclaimed Holocaust graphic novel that was banned by the Tennessee school district, said the decision

Art Spiegelman, author of Maus, the acclaimed Holocaust graphic novel that was banned by the Tennessee school district, said the decision “left his jaw open.”

Are words objectionable? Yes, there is no one who thinks it is not. But if you remove the first part, it does not change the meaning of what he is trying to portray.

The Tennessee School Board stressed in the minutes that they have no objection to teaching about the Holocaust, but some are concerned that the work is age-inappropriate.

Although they discussed editing parts of the book, this led to copyright issues and the board members ultimately decided to find an alternative book on the topic.

This book is not the only one recently banned due to critical controversy on racial theory.

The decision comes as conservative officials across the country have increasingly sought to limit the number of books children read, including books on structural racism and LGBTQ issues.

Republican governors in South Carolina and Texas have called on superintendents to conduct a systematic review of “inappropriate” materials in their state schools.

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