'China will be next': Trump says Putin's attack on Ukraine will give Xi the courage to seize Taiwan

‘China will be next’: Trump says Putin’s attack on Ukraine will give Xi the courage to seize Taiwan

Former President Donald Trump said “China will be next” to launch an attack on Taiwan, emboldened by Vladimir Putin’s aggression against Ukraine due to the helpless leadership of Joe Biden.

The former president said Putin’s “brilliant” move to send so-called peacekeepers to Ukraine would never have happened had he been in the White House, adding: “If I were in power, it’s unthinkable.” This would never happen.

Speaking on The Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show Tuesday, Trump said Putin’s move emboldened Chinese President Xi Jinping.

“China will be next,” he said in a podcast.

“You know, China is going to…”

Travis interrupted him and asked, “Do you think they will attack Taiwan?”

The 75-year-old man replied, “Oh, absolutely. Not with me, they wouldn’t have.

“They are waiting after the Olympics. Now the Olympics are over, and look at your stopwatch, right?

“It’s almost like twin sisters, because you have one who wants Taiwan, I think, equally strong. Someone said, “Who wants this more?” I think it’s equally bad.

Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping at a meeting on February 4 in Beijing.  Donald Trump on Tuesday said he expected Jinping to launch an attack on Taiwan, emboldened by Putin's flirtations with Ukraine.

Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping at a meeting on February 4 in Beijing. Donald Trump on Tuesday said he expected Jinping to launch an attack on Taiwan, emboldened by Putin’s flirtations with Ukraine.

'China will be next': Trump says Putin's attack on Ukraine will give Xi the courage to seize Taiwan

He added that under his leadership, “Putin would never have done this, and Xi would never have done that.”

Beijing sees the self-ruled island of Taiwan as a breakaway province that should recognize Chinese sovereignty and has never shied away from using force to achieve this goal.

The United States is required under the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979 to provide Taiwan with the means to defend itself, but is intentionally unclear as to whether the US will come to Taiwan for military assistance if attacked.

Over the past two years, China has stepped up military and diplomatic pressure on Taiwan, whose government says it wants peace but will defend the island if attacked.

China regularly says that Taiwan is the most important and sensitive issue in its relationship with Washington, which is also strained by trade and human rights disputes.

In October, Biden was unequivocal that America would act if China attacked Taiwan, surprising some with his determination to defend Taiwan.

The White House later clarified, “The President has not announced any changes to our policy, and there are no changes to our policy.”

Trump’s analysis is shared by many.

On Sunday, The Australian Financial Review published a commentary titled: “Taiwan Question: When will Xi make his move?”

Dan Blumenthal, director of Asian studies at the American Enterprise Institute, wrote an op-ed in Foreign Policy on Friday titled: “Beijing Could Launch Russia’s Taiwan Strategy.”

Putin’s meeting with Xi in Beijing this month ahead of the Winter Olympics opening ceremonies sparked speculation that a new alliance could be forming between the two great powers as they clash with the US on a range of issues.

Russia and China supported each other’s positions in opposing NATO expansion in the former Soviet republics and backed China’s claim to the self-governing island of Taiwan.

But the relationship remains one-sided.

Russian soldiers on exercises.  On Tuesday, the Russian parliament approved a request for the use of the country's armed forces outside the country.

Russian soldiers on exercises. On Tuesday, the Russian parliament approved a request for the use of the country’s armed forces outside the country.

A tank drives down the street after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered Russian troops to enter two separatist regions in eastern Ukraine.

A tank drives down the street after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered Russian troops to enter two separatist regions in eastern Ukraine.

A tank believed to be Russian has been spotted on a street near the city of Donetsk in separatist-held areas of eastern Ukraine.

A tank believed to be Russian has been spotted on a street near the city of Donetsk in separatist-held areas of eastern Ukraine.

A military truck drives down the street after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the entry of Russian troops.

A military truck drives down the street after Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the entry of Russian troops.

Putin expressed fears that he was going to stage a land grab in eastern Ukraine, saying that his

Putin expressed fears that he was going to stage a land grab in eastern Ukraine, saying that his “peacekeeping” mission would cover the entire Donetsk and Luhansk regions, including territories held by Ukraine. Russia still has about 190,000 troops on the border.

Russian troops watch armored vehicles maneuver in muddy conditions in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, near rebel-held areas in eastern Ukraine.

Russian troops watch armored vehicles maneuver in muddy conditions in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, near rebel-held areas in eastern Ukraine.

Russian mobile artillery and armored personnel carriers were spotted on Tuesday in the Rostov region of Russia near the border with areas held by Ukrainian separatists.

Russian mobile artillery and armored personnel carriers were spotted on Tuesday in the Rostov region of Russia near the border with areas held by Ukrainian separatists.

'China will be next': Trump says Putin's attack on Ukraine will give Xi the courage to seize Taiwan

Today, Putin is believed to have deployed thousands of troops to rebel-held areas of eastern Ukraine (dark red area on the map), but there are fears that he will try to seize control of the wider regions claimed by the separatists (light gray area). )

China’s confident rise as an economic and political power contrasts with Russia’s growing isolation and a return to Cold War bullying and intimidation tactics.

Trump has been highly critical of President Joe Biden’s approach, accusing him of misunderstanding and underestimating Putin.

“If we had been there, this would never have happened,” Trump told the hosts.

“I knew Putin very well. I got along great with him. He liked me. I loved him.

“I mean, you know, he’s a tough nut to crack, he’s got a lot of charm and pride in him.

“But how is he… and he loves his country, you understand? He loves his country. I think he behaves a little differently now.

He added: “I knew he always wanted Ukraine. I talked to him about it.

I said, “You can’t do this. You’re not going to do this. But I saw that he wanted it. I asked him. We talked about this for a long time.

“I think no one probably knows him better in terms of the discussions we have or are having this morning.”

Biden on Tuesday announced tough new sanctions against Russia for “starting” an invasion of Ukraine, but said there was still time to avoid war even as Putin announced plans to send troops outside of Russia.

Russia’s upper house, the Federation Council, has unanimously approved for Putin the deployment of “peacekeepers” in two breakaway regions of Ukraine recognized by Moscow as independent, and possibly in other parts of Ukraine.

Biden announced what he called the “first tranche” of sanctions, including moves to defund Russia and target the country’s financial institutions and “elite.”

But he left the door open for a final diplomatic effort to prevent a full-scale Russian invasion.

“There is no doubt that Russia is the aggressor, so we clearly understand the problems we are facing,” the president said.

Biden’s appeal follows a wave of sanctions announced by Britain and the European Union after Putin recognized the self-proclaimed Donetsk and Luhansk rebel republics.

Germany also announced the termination of certification of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline from Russia.

Putin’s plans remained unclear, but Western officials have been warning for weeks that he is preparing a full-scale invasion of Ukraine, a move that could spark a catastrophic war in Europe.

Putin has said that the Minsk peace agreements on the conflict in Ukraine no longer exist, and he acknowledged the separatists’ claims to more territory than they currently control.

But he added that the deployment of Russian troops would “depend on the specific situation … on the ground” and appeared to offer Ukraine a way out by dropping hopes of joining the US-led NATO military alliance.

Source link

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.