Capitol riots: Biden rejects Trump's demand for executive privilege not to release White House visitor logs

Capitol riots: Biden rejects Trump’s demand for executive privilege not to release White House visitor logs

BREAKING: Biden rejects Trump’s demand for executive privileges and orders ALL White House visitor logs to be handed over to Jan. 6 committee.

  • Joe Biden rejected Trump’s demand for executive privilege to prevent the National Archives from releasing White House visitor logs for the Jan. 6 commission.
  • The second attempt by the ex-president to block the transfer of documents from the Archive to the collegium
  • It is unclear whether Trump will take the case to federal court, as he did last time.
  • Last month, a court ordered the Archives to hand over to the commission a package of documents and materials from the Trump administration.

Joe Biden rejects yet another of Donald Trump’s claims of executive privilege as he seeks to use that power to hide White House visitor logs from the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riots.

In a letter sent to the National Archives on Tuesday, which came into the possession of The New York Times, Biden White House adviser Dana Remus told US archivist David Ferriero that the agency must provide the commission’s materials within 15 days.

Former President Trump is trying to use executive privilege to prevent the commission from receiving the logs, as he did with other White House documents that were given to the committee earlier this month.

The White House plans to inform Trump on Wednesday morning of the rejection of his application for executive privileges, the Times reported.

Trump may try to block or slow down the publication of the journals, as he has done with other White House documents and materials.

Joe Biden Provides an Update on the Russia and Ukraine Situation Tuesday, February 15, 2022 Donald Trump's gestures during a rally outside the White House on January 6, 2021

President Joe Biden has rejected Donald Trump’s demand for executive privileges trying to stop the National Archives from providing White House visitor logs to the January 6 attack team.

People wait for a van after boxes of papers and materials were removed from Eisenhower's executive office building inside the White House compound on January 14, 2021.

People wait for a van after boxes of papers and materials were removed from Eisenhower’s executive office building inside the White House compound on January 14, 2021.

Remus demanded that the logs be turned over within 15 days “in light of the urgency” of the committee’s investigation and insisted that “Congress urgently needs” the release of the documents by the National Archives.

“The constitutional protection of executive privilege should not be used to protect from Congress or the public information that reflects clear and obvious attempts to subvert the Constitution itself,” Remus wrote to the archive.

She added that records must include “visitor logs with appointment information for individuals who were processed to enter the White House complex, including January 6, 2021.”

Last year, Biden opposed Trump’s claim of executive privilege over White House documents and records, which the committee sought to obtain.

Trump went to federal court to block the release, but lost his bid.

The archive handed over the records to the commission in January 2022, and another 15 boxes recovered from his Mar-a-Lago residence were handed over to the commission earlier this month.

Last year, Trump tried to stop the Jan. 6 commission from receiving a package of White House documents from his years in office, citing executive privilege.  The request was blocked by the court after Biden opposed it, and the documents were turned over to the commission in January 2022.

Last year, Trump tried to stop the Jan. 6 commission from receiving a package of White House documents from his years in office, citing executive privilege. The request was blocked by the court after Biden opposed it, and the documents were turned over to the commission in January 2022.

The law requires presidents to keep records related to administrative activities, but the National Archives restricts enforcement in this regard.

One archivist said that the Presidential Records Act operates more on the basis of a “gentlemen’s agreement.”

Some of the documents handed over to the select committee last month were glued together by National Archives staff because they were torn, the agency said in a statement.

While they didn’t say outright that they were torn apart by the former president, Trump’s well-known habits suggest he is the culprit behind the rupture.

Several books, reports, and former employees have claimed that Trump would destroy documents and papers while in office, despite his demand that all records be kept for archives.

He tore up some papers and sent others to the Pentagon in an incinerator bag to be burned.

More recently, a book due out this October reveals that Trump tried to flush papers in the toilet at the White House residence.

New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman writes in Confidence Man that employees often found torn pieces of paper clogging the toilet and had to call in technicians to fix it.

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