Canadian woman accuses police officer of stalking her home over Facebook post

Canadian woman accuses police officer of stalking her home over Facebook post

Nadine Ellis-Maffei said the police visit was like the

Nadine Ellis-Maffei said the police visit was like the “thought police and Big Brother” knocking on her door.

A Canadian woman accused police of making an unannounced visit to her home in response to her Facebook posts in support of the Freedom Convoy protests.

Last Thursday, Nadine Ellis-Maffei posted a video of an Ontario Provincial Police officer knocking on the door of her home near Peterborough to hand her a postcard and brochure after seeing her post on a Facebook group.

Ellis-Maffei wrote on social media that she was considering participating in the protest in Ottawa. According to her, at that moment she did not participate in any demonstrations.

“Due to the protests taking place across the province, yes, we are following the protest. So there’s a protest coming up, I’m just reporting on a peaceful protest,” the officer said in a video filmed last Thursday by Ellis-Maffei.

“I was stunned,” the mother of three, who runs a farm in Peterborough County, Ontario, told the Toronto Sun. “I still can’t believe it.

Ellis-Maffei compared the incident to the “thought police and Big Brother” from the dystopian novel 1984.

An Ontario police officer knocked on the door of her home near Peterborough to hand her a postcard and brochure after seeing her post in a Facebook group. An Ontario police officer knocked on the door of her home near Peterborough to hand her a postcard and brochure after seeing her post in a Facebook group.

An Ontario police officer knocked on the door of her home near Peterborough to hand her a postcard and brochure after seeing her post in a Facebook group.

“I thought it was a free country,” she said, explaining that she considered attending one of the protests but didn’t think it would be appropriate for the police to visit her because of her social media posts.

“To say I’m furious is an understatement,” she wrote in a Facebook post about the incident. “It is not normal. Is always!!!’

“What you see on my video is not a UNP officer politely coming to my house to tell me how to hold a peaceful protest,” she added.

“This is a violation of my privacy in every way, a scare tactic and a huge waste of my tax dollars. This will not be tolerated.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is considering using his emergency powers under the Emergency Act to create “no-go” zones in Ottawa to disperse remaining protests in the nation’s capital.

The Ontario Provincial Police confirmed the video to The Sun but declined to comment further, and it is not clear how many such visits the service made in response to social media posts.

Last week, an Ontario police officer knocked on the door of Nadine Ellis-Maffei's farmhouse to hand her a postcard and brochure after seeing her Facebook group post about the freedom convoy. Last week, an Ontario police officer knocked on the door of Nadine Ellis-Maffei's farmhouse to hand her a postcard and brochure after seeing her Facebook group post about the freedom convoy.

Last week, an Ontario police officer knocked on the door of Nadine Ellis-Maffei’s farmhouse to hand her a pamphlet after seeing her Facebook group post about the freedom convoy.

Canadian police on Wednesday warned anti-Covid demonstrators who have been clogging the streets of Ottawa for nearly three weeks to leave or face arrest, fines and confiscation of their trucks, AFP reported.

Meanwhile, federal authorities have agreed to a peaceful end to the latest of several recent blockades by protesters at border crossings between Canada and the United States.

“You must leave this area immediately,” the Ottawa police said in a message distributed to truckers outside Parliament House.

The statement said that anyone who blocks the streets or helps others to do so will be arrested and prosecuted.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is considering using his emergency powers under the Emergency Act to create no-go zones in Ottawa.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is considering using his emergency powers under the Emergency Act to create no-go zones in Ottawa.

A shirtless protester participates in a blockade of downtown streets near Parliament in Ottawa on Wednesday as a demonstration led by truck drivers continues.

A shirtless protester participates in a blockade of downtown streets near Parliament in Ottawa on Wednesday as a demonstration led by truck drivers continues.

The police also warned that anyone accused or convicted of participating in an illegal demonstration, in addition to criminal penalties, could be banned from entering the United States.

As the notices went out, AFP journalists saw hundreds of trucks continue to occupy the streets in the parliamentary area, honking intermittently, despite Wednesday’s extension of a court order against deafening noises received by an area resident fed up with the riots. .

“We still have a lot of trucks waiting in line,” trucker David Shaw, 65, told AFP. In the event of an arrest, he added: “I’ll be back.”

Truck driver Ian Growen, 42, condemned Trudeau’s decision earlier this week to declare a state of emergency, calling it “a little exaggerated, maybe thinking we’re terrorists.”

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