Can an alien hunting formula help you find love?  Physicist develops tool based on 'Drake equation'

Can an alien hunting formula help you find love? Physicist develops tool based on ‘Drake equation’

Have you ever wondered, “Why am I alone?” or “is there anyone for me?”. Well, the physicist and programmer has a tool that can help.

Stephen Wooding of Southampton combined his love of astrophysics and statistics to create a tool that calculates the odds of finding “the one”.

It is based on the famous Drake Equation, formulated by American astrophysicist Dr. Frank Drake in 1961 as a way to study the likelihood of finding intelligent alien life somewhere in the known universe.

He looks at increasingly unlikely factors, from the average rate of star formation to the proportion of planets that develop intelligent life.

Wooding and his colleague Rijk de Wet, a data scientist, applied this approach to the dating world, estimating the likelihood of love based on a number of factors, including population growth rate, attractiveness, age range, and education level.

It even compares the chance of finding love based on your own criteria, including your opinion of how good you look, to the chance of finding aliens.

“In my case, the chances of love are 2.1 times higher than at a distance of 1,000 light years,” Mr. Wooding told DailyMail.com.

Have you ever wondered,

Have you ever wondered, “Why am I alone?” or “Is there anyone for me?”, well, the physicist and programmer has a tool that can help. stock images

When Frank Drake created his equation, his purpose was not to find aliens or say, “Here’s how we know if aliens exist,” but rather to encourage discussion.

Wooding says he took a similar approach, saying he wanted everyone to “benefit from the equation and look at their chances of love with a scientific mindset.”

This isn’t the first time the equation has turned to the theme of finding love.

Peter Backus, now a professor at the University of Manchester, used the Drake Equation in 2010 to predict that there were only 26 women in the whole of the UK who could match him based on appearance, age and intelligence.

Even though Backus gave himself a one in 285,000 chance of finding “the one”, he met “Rose” at a dinner with friends and they got married in 2013.

“As someone who loves the subject of aliens, I was very interested in the idea of ​​adapting the Drake equation to the world of dating, as Peter Backus did in his dark humorous study,” Wooding explained in an interview with DailyMail.com.

“I find that adding the fun factor of comparing their odds to the possibility of an alien civilization somehow puts things in perspective and makes them realize if there really aren’t many options in their area or if their preferences are too narrow.”

Drake’s equation reads: N = R* x Fp x Ne x Fi x Fc x L, and led to Professor Drake’s prediction that there could be 10,000 civilizations in our galaxy.

In the famous equation, N is the number of civilizations in the galaxy that we can communicate with and that are within our “cone of light” from Earth.

For the rest to look at: the rate of star formation; proportion of stars with a planet; the average number of planets on which life could exist; the proportion of planets on which life develops; proportion of planets with civilization; share of civilizations with discoverable technologies; and the length of time they send signals into space.

When it comes to finding love, Wooding switches the celestial dimension to the human dimension.

He predicts the odds of being single on Valentine’s Day using a formula developed by Backus based on the Drake Equation. It asks for your location, your attractiveness based on your own rating and your own social skills rating.

Stephen Wooding of Southampton, England has combined his love of astrophysics and statistics to create a tool that calculates the odds of finding

Stephen Wooding of Southampton, England has combined his love of astrophysics and statistics to create a tool that calculates the odds of finding “the right one”. stock images

Drake equation for love

Each variable reduces the population to predict the chance of finding love.

It uses the same mathematics as the Drake equation, but with new variables.

r = p. fG . fl. F. Ugh . fb. l

TABLE TITLE Variable Description G Number of potential partners. R UK population growth. fG Percentage of the UK population of the corresponding gender. fLProportion of men/women (according to your preferences) living in your city. fA The proportion of men/women in your city who are in your preferred age range. fUProportion of age-appropriate men/women in your city with a college degree (optional). fBPercentage of college-educated males/females of age-appropriate age in your city who you find physically attractive. lYour own age.

It also asks for detailed information about the potential partner, including their gender, university education, the age range you’re looking for, and expected attractiveness.

“After you enter all the inputs of the calculator, it will show you the number of potential partners,” Wooding explained.

“It also tells you the percentage chance of finding love based on the number of people in your chosen city or in the entire UK.”

It is currently only available to single people in the UK as it is based on data such as population statistics and the number of people with higher education.

Wooding said the chance of finding love is probably much higher than the chance of finding an alien elevator we can talk to.

“It would be great if we did, but the likelihood is very low. However, the aliens must be out there somewhere, given that almost every star has at least one planet,” Wooding told DailyMail.com.

“The main problem, I think, is that we are currently relying on the compatibility of alien civilization technologies with ours, which we may be overestimating.

“Our sensors are now getting closer to the point where we can detect what’s in the atmosphere of exoplanets, so this could be another way to detect life.”

WHAT IS THE DEIK EQUATION?

The Drake equation is a seven-variable way to determine the likelihood of active civilizations beyond Earth.

It takes into account factors such as the rate of star formation, the number of stars that planetary systems can form, and the number of potentially habitable planets in those systems.

The 55-year-old equation, updated in 2016, includes the latest data from NASA’s Kepler satellite on the number of exoplanets that could harbor life.

The researchers also adapted this equation from the number of civilizations currently in existence to the probability that the civilization is the only one that has ever existed.

Researchers have found that the chance of an advanced civilization developing must be less than one in 10 billion trillion for humans to be the only intelligent life in the universe.

If the chances of developing advanced life on a habitable planet are not startlingly small, then humanity is not the only advanced civilization that has ever existed.

But Kepler’s data shows that those odds are much higher, meaning that technologically advanced aliens probably existed at some point.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.