BLM activist charged with attempted murder of Kentucky mayoral candidate

BLM activist charged with attempted murder of Kentucky mayoral candidate

A Black Lives Matter activist and Louisville City Council candidate has been charged with attempted murder, accused of opening fire Monday on a mayoral candidate whose shirt was hit by a bullet at his campaign headquarters.

Quintez Brown, 21, also faces four charges of wanton endangerment, Louisville police spokesman Aaron Ellis said. Brown, who is a student at the University of Louisville, pleaded not guilty on Tuesday and his bail was set at $100,000.

The judge ordered him not to contact the alleged victim, 46-year-old Craig Greenberg, a Jewish Democrat running for mayor of Louisville, or Greenberg’s campaign headquarters.

Police said Brown appeared to have acted alone, with motives still under investigation. Brown stayed at the Louisville Metro Jail late Tuesday night.

After Brown disappeared briefly last year, family members said they were concerned about his mental health. His lawyer, Rob Eggert, told the court on Tuesday that “there are serious mental problems here” and he will send Brown for a psychiatric evaluation.

Quintez Brown, a 21-year-old University of Louisville student and Black Lives Matter activist, has been charged with attempted murder for allegedly trying to shoot mayoral candidate Craig Greenberg.

Quintez Brown, a 21-year-old University of Louisville student and Black Lives Matter activist, has been charged with attempted murder for allegedly trying to shoot mayoral candidate Craig Greenberg.

Craig Greensberg (pictured), the Jewish Democratic candidate for mayor of Louisville, was Brown's target in Tuesday's alleged shooting.

Craig Greensberg (pictured), the Jewish Democratic candidate for mayor of Louisville, was Brown’s target in Tuesday’s alleged shooting.

Brown's lawyer said there were

Brown’s lawyer said there were “serious mental problems” and he would refer Brown for a psychiatric evaluation before trial.

Brown, a social justice activist running for the council as an independent, has campaigned with a slate of candidates opposed to projects that they say will worsen gentrification in Kentucky’s largest city.

The apparent target of Monday’s shooting, Greenberg touted his experience at the center of the city’s revitalization efforts and helped draft legislation to promote development in the predominantly black western part of Louisville.

Greenberg said Tuesday that his ears are still ringing from the shots fired at him the day before. Despite the attack, he said his resolve to run for mayor had not wavered.

“If any good comes out of this, I hope that I will not only become a more effective mayor, but also become someone who can unite the city to unite around the implementation of solutions aimed at ending gun violence.” he said. said in a telephone interview.

He said his team has stepped up security measures, but he intends to continue the public campaign.

“I’m focused on bringing people together,” Greenberg said. “Unfortunately, there are too many things separating people right now and I hope that people will start to lower the temperature.”

Greenberg said on Monday that he was at his campaign headquarters with four colleagues when a man appeared at the door and began firing several bullets. According to him, the man pulled out a gun and started shooting at him.

“Despite the fact that one bullet went so close that it grazed my sweater and shirt, no one was physically hurt,” he said. According to him, one of the employees managed to close the door, which they barricaded with tables and desks, and the suspect fled.

Apprehended shortly less than half a mile from the scene, Brown carried a loaded 9mm magazine in a trouser pocket, as well as a drawstring bag containing a pistol and additional pistol magazines, according to the arrest report.

Brown, a former intern and columnist for the editor of The Courier Journal, has been writing extensively on social media, posting and retweeting comments on social justice issues. In a recent post, Brown showed the faces of several young black people killed by gunfire in Louisville, writing, “This is our reality. All those kids are gone.”

“Gun violence reveals the interconnected nature of our reality,” Brown wrote. “What affects one directly affects everyone indirectly. Especially in our segregated environment.”

His Twitter profile biography reads: “We have one scientific and correct solution, pan-Africanism: the complete liberation and unification of Africa under scientific socialism.”

Brown, who took part in the 2020 racial justice protests, was reported missing for 11 days in June 2021 before being found safe on July 1.

Brown was arrested shortly after the incident outside Greenberg's office (pictured).  When he was arrested, he had a loaded magazine, a 9mm pistol, a gun case, and additional magazines.

Brown was arrested shortly after the incident outside Greenberg’s office (pictured). When he was arrested, he had a loaded magazine, a 9mm pistol, a gun case, and additional magazines.

BLM activist charged with attempted murder of Kentucky mayoral candidate Brown is active on social media, posting and retweeting comments on social justice issues.

Brown is active on social media, posting and retweeting comments on social justice issues.

Charles Booker, a Louisville Democrat running for the US Senate, said on Tuesday that he has known Brown since Brown was a student at the University of Louisville. Booker said that when he last saw him in the summer of 2020, the man was focused on helping others.

“A young man I knew then was working to end the violence in our city, not perpetuate it,” Booker said in a press release Tuesday afternoon.

Booker said he was heartbroken by Greenberg, his family and the campaign.

Greenberg has achieved a large fundraising lead in a crowded race to fill the seat of outgoing Mayor Greg Fisher in a Democratic-leaning city. A Harvard-trained lawyer, Greenberg helped found the 21c Museum Hotels in Louisville, which employed more than 1,100 employees. The company is credited with helping revive Main Street in downtown Louisville and other city neighborhoods across the country.

Brown went missing for two weeks last summer. After he was found safe, his parents issued a statement asking for patience and confidentiality as they attend to Quintes’ “physical, mental and spiritual needs,” according to the Courier Journal.

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