Barack Obama condemned "Putin's brazen attack on the people of Ukraine"

Barack Obama condemned “Putin’s brazen attack on the people of Ukraine”

Barack Obama became the latest former president to condemn Vladimir Putin’s deadly attack on Ukraine.

Obama, who was president when Russia occupied Crimea in 2014, issued a scathing statement Thursday after Vladimir Putin ordered an invasion of his Eastern European neighbor in a “daring attack on the people of Ukraine.”

“The consequences of Russia’s reckless actions extend beyond Ukraine,” Obama said. “This illegal invasion of the heart of Europe also threatens the foundations of international order and security.

“For some time now, we have been watching the forces of division and authoritarianism move around the world, attacking the ideals of democracy, the rule of law, equality, individual freedom, freedom of expression and religion, and self-determination. The Russian invasion of Ukraine shows what these dangerous trends can lead to and why they cannot be ignored.”

He said that he and his wife Michele would pray for “all those who bear the cost of a senseless war”.

Former President Barack Obama issued a blunt statement on Thursday as Russia launched a fight with Ukraine for control of the Eastern European country.  The 43rd President called it

Former President Barack Obama issued a blunt statement on Thursday as Russia launched a fight with Ukraine for control of the Eastern European country. The 43rd President called it “a brazen attack on the people of Ukraine”, which could have global consequences

“The consequences of Russia's reckless actions extend beyond Ukraine,” Obama said.

“The consequences of Russia’s reckless actions extend beyond Ukraine,” Obama said. “This illegal invasion of the heart of Europe also threatens the foundations of international order and security”

The 43rd president had a difficult relationship with Putin and was often criticized for being too soft on Russia during his time in office.

Obama’s senior national security official James Clapper said this week that he would like his administration to do more to punish Russia for its 2014 annexation of Crimea.

Asked if the White House should hit Putin harder at the time, the former director of national intelligence told Fox News: “Oh, yes, yes. I would like us as an administration to be more aggressive in 2014.”

Clapper also warned that Russia was “bolder than it was eight years ago” when it invaded Crimea.

As of Thursday afternoon, dozens of people have died since the first day of the conflict.  Ukrainian soldiers next to destroyed Russian armored vehicles near Kharkiv on February 24, 2022.

As of Thursday afternoon, dozens of people have died since the first day of the conflict. Ukrainian soldiers next to destroyed Russian armored vehicles near Kharkiv on February 24, 2022.

James Clapper, who served Obama as a senior national security official, warned that Russia was

James Clapper, who served Obama as a senior national security official, warned that Russia was “bolder than it was eight years ago” when it invaded Crimea.

During a January Senate hearing, Biden’s candidacy for assistant secretary of defense for international security also sharply criticized the Obama White House’s response to the takeover of Crimea.

Celeste Wallander, Obama’s assistant secretary of state, said: “I think our response in 2014 was too slow and too gradual.

“And this is borne out by the lessons that I have learned and that I think others in the national security community have learned to better counter Russia’s ongoing aggression.”

She added that, in retrospect, “it would be appropriate and necessary to provide” weapons to Ukraine.

Her criticism, while aimed at the Obama White House, reflects Biden as his vice president, who was interested in Ukraine among other unappetizing foreign policy concerns.

Obama, in his statement, urged others to join him in “loud and clear” condemnation of Russia.

“And every American, regardless of party, should support President Biden’s efforts, in coordination with our closest allies, to impose tough sanctions on Russia — sanctions that place a real price on Russia’s autocratic elites,” he said.

“Such sanctions may have some economic implications, given Russia’s significant role in global energy markets. But this is the price we must be willing to pay to take the side of freedom.”

Also Thursday, former President George W. Bush issued a scathing statement condemning Putin for what he called Europe’s “worst security crisis” since World War II.

Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an invasion of Ukraine this week that was widely condemned by world leaders.

This week, Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an invasion of Ukraine that was widely condemned by world leaders.

He said that he and his wife Michele would pray for

He said that he and his wife Michele would pray for “all those who bear the cost of a senseless war”.

Putin’s land and air attack on a sovereign Slavic state has sparked widespread outrage, drawing comparisons to Nazi Germany’s mid-20th-century invasion of neighboring countries.

Rep. Michael McCall, the top Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said Thursday that “we haven’t seen anything like this since Hitler invaded Poland.”

Dozens had been killed as of Thursday afternoon, and Kiev troops were reported to have lost control of the Chernobyl exclusion zone, the site of the infamous nuclear disaster where a powerful enough Russian attack could unleash a radiation cloud across Europe.

Images of rockets hitting apartments and Ukrainian civilians running in traffic and praying in squares followed reports of Russian rockets targeting Ukrainian government military bases and airports.

“The Russian attack on Ukraine represents the most serious security crisis on the European continent since World War II,” Bush said in a statement. “I join the international community in condemning Vladimir Putin’s unprovoked and unjustified invasion of Ukraine.”

Donald Trump’s take on the power grab has changed dramatically as he praised Putin’s strategic approach, which began with infiltration into separatist-occupied regions.

“Yesterday I went in there and there was a TV screen and I said, ‘This is brilliant,'” Trump said Tuesday during an interview with conservative podcaster Buck Sexton. “Putin declares most of Ukraine – Ukraine – Putin declares it independent. Oh, that’s great.

“I said, ‘How reasonable is that?’ continued the former President of the United States. “And he will go there and be a peacemaker. This is the most powerful peacekeeping force… We could use it on our southern border. This is the strongest peacekeeping force I have ever seen. There were more army tanks than I have ever seen. They will keep the world in order.

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