Bank freezes accounts of Freedom Convoy supporters as fundraising site says it will violate order

Bank freezes accounts of Freedom Convoy supporters as fundraising site says it will violate order

A Canadian bank has frozen $1.1 million in donations to Freedom Convoy protesters via a crowdfunding platform as the anti-mandate movement drags on into its third week.

The Toronto-Dominion Bank took the move after the Ontario Supreme Court issued an order preventing the dispersal of the column’s donations made through GiveSendGo, which raised more than $9.2 million for the column’s supporters.

A spokeswoman for the bank confirmed that the funds were seized in accordance with a court decision issued last Thursday.

“TD has asked the court to accept the funds that were raised through crowdfunding and deposited into personal accounts with TD so that they can be managed and distributed in accordance with the intentions of the donors,” Carla Hindman told the Globe and Mail.

Despite the provincial government making it illegal to donate to GiveSendGo trucker campaigns, the crowdfunding platform has said it has no plans to back down.

“Canada has absolutely ZERO jurisdiction over how we manage our funds here at GiveSendGo,” the company tweeted. “All funds for EACH campaign on GiveSendGo go directly to the recipients of those campaigns.”

A bank in Toronto has frozen $1.4 million in money transferred from a fundraising platform to a bank account in accordance with a recent ruling by the Ontario Supreme Court.  Freedom Convoy protesters in Surrey, British Columbia on February 12, 2022.

A bank in Toronto has frozen $1.4 million in money transferred from a fundraising platform to a bank account in accordance with a recent ruling by the Ontario Supreme Court. Freedom Convoy protesters in Surrey, British Columbia on February 12, 2022.

The Toronto-Dominion Bank said it had frozen donations that were transferred to individual bank accounts.

The Toronto-Dominion Bank said it had frozen donations that were transferred to individual bank accounts.

Thousands of truckers gathered in Ottawa on Jan. 29 to protest a new federal order requiring truckers to be vaccinated against Covid in order to re-enter the country. Unvaccinated Canadian drivers will be required to self-quarantine upon return to the country.

This is the latest financial turmoil for the convoy after Gofundme froze $5 million in donations earlier this month, saying it wanted to determine how the funds would be used.

The organizers provided an explanation, and two days later, the crowdfunding site unlocked the account, allowing donations to continue, and released $1 million in donated funds.

But it was frozen again as donations approached US$8 million, after days of political pressure from left-wing politicians who called the truckers “mercenaries.”

Since then, donors have turned to GiveSendGo for the support of the convoy members. The Support-a-Trucker platform campaign raised over $583,000 in donations, while the Freedom Convoy 22 campaign reached over $9.27 million, more than double the $16 million target.

“The money raised will be donated to our truckers to help pay for the trip,” campaign organizers said. “The funds will be used primarily to cover fuel costs for our truckers, and will be used to help with food and housing when needed.”

Convoy said on Saturday it was challenging a provincial court’s decision to freeze donations transferred to individual accounts.

“Once again, the repeated actions by governments to keep your donations out of the Ottawa truckers show the importance of this fight for freedom,” organizers said in a statement posted on the GiveSendGo website.

“The best way is to keep making donations to help truckers here on earth and not claim a refund.”

The GiveSendGo Support-a-Trucker campaign raised over $583,000 in donations, while the Freedom Convoy 22 campaign raised over $9.27 million, more than half of the $16 million planned.

The GiveSendGo Support-a-Trucker campaign raised over $583,000 in donations, while the Freedom Convoy 22 campaign raised over $9.27 million, more than half of the $16 million planned.

The crowdfunding platform has said it has no plans to back down.  “Canada has absolutely ZERO jurisdiction over how we manage our funds here at GiveSendGo,” the company tweeted.  “All funds for EACH campaign on GiveSendGo go directly to the recipients of those campaigns.”

The crowdfunding platform has said it has no plans to back down. “Canada has absolutely ZERO jurisdiction over how we manage our funds here at GiveSendGo,” the company tweeted. “All funds for EACH campaign on GiveSendGo go directly to the recipients of those campaigns.”

Trucker supporters vowed to stop doing business with TD after learning it had frozen donations.

“Due to @TD_Canada’s unethical and frankly illegal actions regarding the money they are trying to withhold for trucker protest fundraising, I am terminating all business with @TDAmeritrade and encouraging others to do the same,” wrote @Jokers_CEO in Twitter.

“A dangerous precedent,” added @beautifulwood. “Those who disagree with this and have @TD_Canada accounts, close them in support of freedom.”

Others supported the bank, tweeting “I’ll have to find out if I can transfer money or any business to TD.” I want to support a bank that supports a strong and united Canada.”

Bank freezes accounts of Freedom Convoy supporters as fundraising site says it will violate order Bank freezes accounts of Freedom Convoy supporters as fundraising site says it will violate order Twitter users were divided over TD's actions, with some promising to stop doing business with the bank, while others said they planned to support it.

Twitter users were divided over TD’s actions, with some promising to stop doing business with the bank, while others said they planned to support it.

On Saturday, Freedom Convoy truckers continued a six-day standoff in Windsor, Ontario, in an attempt to “hold the line” on the Ambassador Bridge leading to the US border.

On Sunday, Windsor police said they arrested several officers for disorderly conduct and towed cars as they tried to disperse the protest.

Other cities, including Ottawa, have also faced an influx of protesters, with police reporting 4,000 protesters on Saturday.

Ottawa police officials initially told protesters earlier Saturday to threaten arrests and fines if they didn’t clean up the scene by midnight.

A Canadian judge had also previously asked protesters to disperse by 7 p.m., but was unable to get them out.

In addition, other demonstrators also blocked the borders with the Canadian province of Manitoba at the Emerson Port of Entry, which is shared with North Dakota, and at Coutts Crossing in Alberta, which is used by truckers to enter and leave Montana.

The problems have escalated into current problems related to the supply chain crisis, as shortages of auto parts have led to the temporary closure of car companies.

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