Axelrod warns Biden to "tread lightly" as he writes State of the Union.

Axelrod warns Biden to “tread lightly” as he writes State of the Union.

Obama strategist David Axelrod warns Biden to show “humility” and “act with caution” when writing State of the Union.

  • David Axelrod warned President Joe Biden to show “humility” in his upcoming address to Congress.
  • Axelrod wrote in The New York Times that the “temptation” would be to outline the accomplishments
  • “But, Mr. President, tread carefully,” warned former President Barack Obama’s strategist.
  • Axelrod pointed to Biden’s January 19 press conference and suggested there was too much bragging.
  • “The state of the union is tense,” he wrote. “To claim otherwise… would be false and off topic”

Former President Barack Obama’s strategist David Axelrod warned President Joe Biden to show “humility” when he delivered his first address to Congress on March 1.

“This speech will garner the largest television audience that the President is likely to enjoy this year, and as always, there will be a temptation to announce our achievements and claim we have weathered the storm,” Axelrod wrote in The New York Times. Monday. “But, Mr. President, be careful.

Axelrod, who is often credited with Obama’s meteoric rise in politics, pointed to Biden’s January 19 press conference, which marked the last day of his first year in office, and suggested there was too much bragging.

David Axelrod President Joe Biden

David Axelrod (left) wrote in The New York Times on Monday that President Joe Biden needed to show “humility” when he delivered the March 1 State of the Union address.

President Joe Biden (center) speaks in his first joint address to Congress on April 28, 2021 with Vice President Kamala Harris (left) and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (right)

President Joe Biden (center) speaks in his first joint address to Congress on April 28, 2021 with Vice President Kamala Harris (left) and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (right)

“The state of the union is in a tense state,” he wrote in The Times. “To claim otherwise—to emphasize the progress we have made without fully recognizing the difficult path we have traveled and the distance we have to go—would be false and out of touch with reality.”

“You can’t just make Americans believe things are better than they feel,” he added.

Axelrod pointed to his own experience in the Obama White House when the former Democratic president came to power after the 2008 Great Recession and Americans were still in pain during the first term.

“We have learned to advance progress delicately and always with an emphasis on the ongoing struggle of the middle class trying to rebuild their financial position after the collapse and decades of volatile fortunes,” Axelrod recalled.

Otherwise, “the trauma of that disaster was so deep that tasteless claims of progress met with angry backlash,” Axelrod said.

An Obama aide advised Biden to speak out about what the White House and Congress have done to solve the problems and voice “real hope for a better future.”

“But admit that we are still at the mercy of the national trauma,” he said. “Polls show that the vast majority of Americans believe we are on the wrong track, and people will not have the patience for lavish claims of progress that challenge their life experiences.”

A former White House adviser noted that millions of Americans have lost loved ones, their children have lost class time, parents are struggling, and healthcare professionals are in crisis.

Axelrod noted that even though the number of omicrons is declining, things are still bad for many Americans.

“The nation will probably still be in decline and its people will want to hear their president admit why,” Axelrod also said.

Axelrod ended the column by pointing out that Biden was the right person for the tone.

He said that what Biden possessed through his countless tragedies was “supernatural empathy.”

“Middle-class Joe is a nickname he’s earned over the years, reflecting his values ​​and feelings,” Axelrod wrote. “Many national politicians speak the language of Washington. Biden at his best speaks American.”

“Now he needs to find that voice by telling the story of the trials many Americans have endured, celebrating their resilience and painting a believable, realistic picture of how we can all take back control of our lives,” Axelrod said.

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