An armless dinosaur roamed Argentina 70 million years ago and could grab prey with its huge jaws

An armless dinosaur roamed Argentina 70 million years ago and could grab prey with its huge jaws

An armless dinosaur may not seem too scary, but a new species that roamed Argentina 70 million years ago was likely a skilled predator, despite its forelimbs being even shorter than those of a Tyrannosaurus rex.

Fossilized remains of a new species, named Guemesia ochoai, have been discovered in Argentina by researchers at the Natural History Museum in London.

Their analysis suggests that Geumesia ochoai was a species of abelisaurus, a clade of dinosaurs with tiny forelimbs that had to rely on their powerful heads and jaws to capture prey.

Professor Anjali Goswami, scientific director of the museum and co-author of the study, said: “This new dinosaur is quite unusual for its species.

“It has several key characteristics that suggest it is a new species, providing important new information about an area of ​​the world about which we know little.”

An armless dinosaur may not seem too scary, but a new species that roamed Argentina 70 million years ago was probably a skilled predator, despite the fact that its forelimbs are even shorter than those of T. Rex (artist's impression)

An armless dinosaur may not seem too scary, but a new species that roamed Argentina 70 million years ago was probably a skilled predator, despite the fact that its forelimbs are even shorter than those of T. Rex (artist’s impression)

ABELISAURID

The Abelisauridae were a striking family of theropod dinosaurs, averaging 16 to 30 feet in length, that roamed primarily in Patagonia and other areas of the ancient southern supercontinent Gondwana.

Today, Gondwana is recognized by Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica, the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula.

While abelisaurids generally resembled T-Rex with tiny, stubby arms, they had unusually short, deep skulls that often had crests, bumps, and horns.

When Tyrannosaurus and its relatives roamed North America and Asia, abelisaurids occupied a similar niche in Patagonia and other parts of South America.

Abelisaurids had huge jaws. Like the T-Rex, they relied on them to crush and kill their prey.

The Abelisauridae were a striking family of theropod dinosaurs, averaging 16 to 30 feet in length, that roamed primarily in Patagonia and other areas of the ancient southern supercontinent Gondwana.

Today, Gondwana is recognized by Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica, the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula.

While abelisaurids generally resembled T-Rex with tiny, stubby arms, they had unusually short, deep skulls that often had crests, bumps, and horns.

Previous research suggests that abelisaurids fed on large dinosaurs like titanosaurs despite having tiny hands that were “virtually useless”.

Instead, dinosaurs relied on their powerful heads and jaws to catch unsuspecting prey.

Abelisaurid fossils have previously been found in rocks in Africa, South America, India and Europe, with 35 species already described in Argentina.

However, while most of these 35 species come from Patagonia, in southern Argentina, a new species has been found in the Los Blancitos Formation near Amblayo in northern Argentina.

“The dinosaurs living in this region were very different from those that lived in other parts of Argentina, which supports the idea of ​​the existence of separate provinces in the Cretaceous period of South America,” said Professor Goswami.

While most abelisaurids had “relatively small” brains, Guemesia ochoai’s skull was found to be 70% smaller than that of its relatives.

The researchers are not clear if this was due to the fact that the new specimen was a juvenile, or if all members of the species had small skulls.

The new species was discovered in the Los Blancitos Formation near Amblayo in northern Argentina.

The new species was discovered in the Los Blancitos Formation near Amblayo in northern Argentina.

Abelisaurid fossils have previously been found in rocks in Africa, South America, India and Europe, with 35 species already described in Argentina.  However, while most of these 35 species come from Patagonia, in southern Argentina, a new species has been found in the Los Blancitos Formation near Amblayo in northern Argentina.

Abelisaurid fossils have previously been found in rocks in Africa, South America, India and Europe, with 35 species already described in Argentina. However, while most of these 35 species come from Patagonia, in southern Argentina, a new species has been found in the Los Blancitos Formation near Amblayo in northern Argentina.

It was found to have rows of small holes in the front of its skull that may have helped the animal stay cool, and blood was pumped into the thin skin at the front of the head to release heat.

Meanwhile, unlike other abelisaurid species, this new species did not have horns.

According to the team, this suggests that the new species was either at the very bottom of the family tree, or was closely related to the group’s ancestors.

While abelisaurids generally resembled T-Rex with tiny, stubby arms, they had unusually short, deep skulls that often had crests, bumps, and horns.

While abelisaurids generally resembled T-Rex with tiny, stubby arms, they had unusually short, deep skulls that often had crests, bumps, and horns.

The team now hopes to discover more Guemesia ochoai and its relatives to learn more about life in ancient Argentina.

Prof Goswami added: “Understanding global events like mass extinction requires global datasets, but there are many parts of the world that have not been studied in detail and tons of fossils are yet to be discovered.

“During our last trip, we left some interesting fossils in the ground, not knowing that it would be years before we could return to our field sites.

“Now we hope it won’t be long before we finish excavating them and discover many more species of this unique fauna.”

HOW THE DINOSAURS DISENTED ABOUT 66 MILLION YEARS AGO

Dinosaurs ruled and dominated the Earth about 66 million years ago before they suddenly became extinct.

Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction is the name of this mass extinction.

For many years it was thought that climate change had disrupted the food chain of the giant reptiles.

In the 1980s, paleontologists discovered a layer of iridium.

It is an element that is rarely found on Earth, but is found in vast quantities in space.

When it was dated, it coincided exactly with when dinosaurs disappeared from the fossil record.

Ten years later, scientists discovered the massive Chicxulub crater at the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, which dates back to the period under review.

The scientific consensus now says that the two are linked, and both were likely caused by a huge asteroid hitting Earth.

Given the projected size and velocity of the impact, the impact should have produced a massive shock wave and likely sparked seismic activity.

The fallout would have created plumes of ash that would likely have covered the entire planet and made it impossible for the dinosaurs to survive.

In other animals and plant species, the interval between generations was shorter, which allowed them to survive.

There are several other theories as to what caused the famous animals to die.

One early theory was that small mammals ate dinosaur eggs, while another suggests that toxic angiosperms (flowering plants) killed them.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.