An angry rhinoceros chases conservationists who are forced to hide in a tree in South Africa [Video]

An angry rhinoceros chases conservationists who are forced to hide in a tree in South Africa [Video]

This is the terrifying moment when an angry black rhinoceros chased the conservationists up a tree.

Tom Frew of Ranger Buck Safaris was joining an operation to find and collar white rhinos in South Africa when they received a call informing them that a rare black bull was in the vicinity.

After sedating and collaring the young bull, Frew, 26, was forced to climb a tiny tree to evade the attacking giant.

Tom Frew and his colleague were forced to hide in a tree after chasing a black rhino in South Africa.

Tom Frew and his colleague were forced to hide in a tree after chasing a black rhino in South Africa.

The team wanted to sedate and collar the young black bull so he could be watched remotely.

The team wanted to sedate and collar the young black bull so he could be watched remotely.

Perched precariously on a thin branch just above the nose of the rhinoceros, Mr. Frew and his colleague had to stand still until the angry bull finally ran away.

Footage taken in September 2021 and recently released shows the rhino aggressively puffing and puffing under a tree.

Its horns were cut off to scare off poachers during a previous surgical operation, but that hasn’t made the animal any less aggressive.

Mr Frew, Marketing Manager from Cape Town, South Africa, said: “It all happened so fast that it ended before we even had a chance to understand what had just happened and how lucky we were that it ended like this. as intended.” did.

“The African black rhino is less common than the white rhino and is also much more aggressive and dangerous, especially when provoked or annoyed.”

“Of course, as soon as the rhinoceros came to his senses, he smelled my colleagues in the surrounding trees and furiously rushed from tree to tree, trying to even the odds with us after ruining his morning.

“Because the rhino was so obsessed with everyone else, I didn’t even bother to climb the tree next to me and still stood on the ground filming the noise with my phone.

Tom Frew (pictured) and his colleague were unharmed despite a close encounter with a rhinoceros.

Tom Frew (pictured) and his colleague were unharmed despite a close encounter with a rhinoceros.

“After what seemed like a lifetime, the animal finally stopped chasing and returned to the bushes, and we emerged unscathed after what could easily have ended with yet another unusual African death statistic.”

“We remained in the tree for several minutes after the animal disappeared, just to be safe, before finally descending and returning to vehicle safety and continuing the rest of the collar operation.”

He added: “I was just excited and full of adrenaline from this meeting.”

Ranger Buck Safaris works with several organizations across South Africa to protect wildlife by offering clients the opportunity to join the real conservation effort.

Mr Frew said: “When black rhinos wake up after these procedures, they almost always choose to fight over flight and often put on an incredible show, running and throwing themselves at whatever they can.”

“If you manage to find a strong, sturdy tree, more often than not they will come right under you to try and get revenge.

“Suddenly and completely out of nowhere, the rhinoceros stopped dead in his tracks, turned to us and rushed in our direction at breakneck speed.

“I was immediately filled with agonizing regret as I turned around to see for the first time correctly the tree we had chosen in case of a rhinoceros attack.

Mr Frew said he and a colleague stayed in the tree for minutes after the rhino retreated back into the bushes as they didn't want to become

Mr Frew said he and a colleague stayed in the tree for minutes after the rhino retreated back into the bushes as they didn’t want to become “another unusual African death statistic”.

“It had a trunk not much thicker than my thigh and two lousy, low-hanging branches that were tall enough to keep us out of the reach of a rhinoceros.

“Out of time and with no other options, I decided that this was my best bet and hurried to join my colleague, who was sitting on one of the branches no more than 1.5 meters above the ground.

“In a matter of seconds, I reached the highest possible point that I could climb without risking breaking a branch and falling off the tree, where the rhinoceros was now waiting below, panting furiously and trying to figure out how he could get to us.

“All the rhinoceros had to do was put just a little of its weight on the flimsy trunk, and that would be enough for the whole tree to fall with us inside it.”

“There was less than half a meter between us and the animal and we had nowhere to go and all we could do was stay as still as possible and hope the animal eventually loses interest.”

“We haven’t been on the tree for more than three minutes. We had to wait there for a while to make sure the animal had indeed disappeared before we went down.”

A spokesman for Ranger Buck Safaris said: “Tom, our marketing manager, had a memorable encounter with the endangered black rhino a few weeks ago during a rhino collaring operation in South Africa.

“Shortly after the animal began to wake up after being put on the anti-poacher collar, our team climbed some of the surrounding trees where we could observe the animal from a safe vantage point.

“The rhinoceros, frightened and confused after waking up after the procedure, smelled the scent of our team in a nearby tree and rushed to scout before returning to the surrounding bush, leaving us with an exciting story to tell next time. campfire and incredible video to prove it!”

Conservationists are taking drastic action by decapitating the rhinoceros so that poachers have less incentive to kill the animal.

Ranger Buck Safaris said the procedure is done while the rhino is under anesthesia and is completely painless.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.