All trucks at key border crossings are being scanned with high-energy beams that can see deep inside the cargo.

All trucks at key border crossings are being scanned with high-energy beams that can see deep inside the cargo.

The new type of scanner will be installed at the busiest checkpoints on the southern border of the United States to reduce the amount of drugs entering the country.

Known as “multi-energy portals” and operating on the same principle as X-rays, the cargo bays of trucks will be pierced with high-energy waves, allowing customs and border guards to look right inside.

The lower level of the high-energy wave will be used to shield the driver’s cabin and allow him to stay inside while the scanner performs a scan.

This will greatly speed up border crossings and also catch more illegal drugs such as fentanyl crossing the border from Mexico.

Only one truck in 20 is currently being checked for drugs, and US officials are forced to act after drug deaths soared to 100,000 a year, many of which are the result of drug smuggling from the South.

All trucks at key border crossings are being scanned with high-energy beams that can see deep inside the cargo.

“Multi-energy portals” would hit cargo bays with high-energy waves, but use safer low-energy cabin shielding, allowing drivers to stay inside.

Congress has directed US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to develop a plan to scan 100 percent of vehicles arriving at the southern border.  Pictured: An aerial view of vehicles lining up to cross the border at the port of San Ysidro on the Mexico-U.S. border in Tijuana.

Congress has directed US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to develop a plan to scan 100 percent of vehicles arriving at the southern border. Pictured: An aerial view of vehicles lining up to cross the border at the port of San Ysidro on the Mexico-U.S. border in Tijuana.

At the busiest intersections, about 500 trucks an hour enter the US, and drug smugglers are essentially betting that their vehicle will not be searched.

Only about 25 vehicles (5 per cent of 500) can be regularly searched due to lack of staff and lack of time, but new MEPs will help speed up the process and should spot more smuggling in the process.

Powerful high-energy scanners will be able to see deep inside the cargo and detect “anomalies” and will also provide CBP staff with four images taken inside each truck.

Those using the machines will look for strange patterns or densities that look suspicious and may be heavily hidden illegal drugs.

The new computer software will also help decide which trucks go through security checks and which should be subjected to more scrutiny by officers or K-9s.  In the picture, a CBP agent checks a vehicle for contraband in line to enter the US.

The new computer software will also help decide which trucks go through security checks and which should be subjected to more scrutiny by officers or K-9s. In the picture, a CBP agent checks a vehicle for contraband in line to enter the US.

High-energy scanning is capable of producing vivid 3D images of vehicle loads.

CBP is also adding new software called CertScan, which aims to optimize the amount of data fed into inspectors’ monitors.

The software will help you decide which vehicles should be searched by officers or K-9s.

Well-known companies and shippers with a clean reputation are considered less risky. Trucks that are unfamiliar or contain random loads are checked more carefully.

The system also uses license plate recognition software and the cameras link to Department of Homeland Security databases.

“Running them all on this platform allows you to significantly increase the percentage of inspections without a significant increase in staff,” Jonathan Fleming, whose company S2 Global created the software, told The Post.

Cross-border drug smugglers often use fake vehicle panels, hidden compartments, and even transport other items in bulk to disguise and further hide the drugs.

Cross-border drug smugglers often use fake vehicle panels, hidden compartments, and even transport other items in bulk to disguise and further hide the drugs.

Are you going to catch everything? No. But I think you can do a very good job of greatly enhancing your ability to intercept at a traditional port of entry with these technologies.

Eight times more trucks per hour can be scanned compared to existing technology.

Rail cars carrying goods are scanned at 100 percent. The agency sees commercial trucks as the next phase and wants to increase the number of inspections to a similar level.

Currently, such truck checks require drivers to get out of their cabs, which slows down the transition overall, as the energy levels used to scan can be potentially harmful to their health. With the new lock, drivers can stay put while the machine does its job.

Cross-border drug smugglers often use fake vehicle panels, hidden compartments, and even transport other items in bulk to disguise and further hide the drugs.

The new computer software will also help decide which trucks go through security checks and which should be subjected to more thorough checks by officers or K-9s (file photo).

The new computer software will also help decide which trucks go through security checks and which should be subjected to more thorough checks by officers or K-9s (file photo).

Even gas tanks and engines can be adapted to include hidden compartments.

Some drivers are unaware that they are carrying drugs in their car for someone else.

To date, CBP has installed multi-energy portals at ports of entry in Brownsville, Texas and Laredo, Texas.

Drivers are told about the new technology, reassured that it is safe, and allowing them to opt for the traditional check if they have any doubts.

“It’s a game of cat and mouse,” Flores said. “We will adapt to the cartels in the same way that they adapt to the way we conduct inspections.”

“This is a game-changer for us,” said Alberto Flores, CBP director of the Laredo Port of Entry, which seized 588 pounds of the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl in fiscal year 2021.

Drivers are told about the new technology, reassured that it is safe, and allowing them to opt for the traditional inspection pictured above if they have concerns.

Drivers are told about the new technology, reassured that it is safe, and allowing them to opt for the traditional inspection pictured above if they have concerns.

This is eleven times more than the 50 pounds of drug found in 2020.

According to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, fentanyl overdose is the leading cause of death in Americans aged 18 to 45.

100,000 Americans die each year from drug overdoses, and most of those deaths are associated with fentanyl.

“The more scans we do, the higher the chance of a seizure,” Flores said in an interview with the Washington Post.

Congress is calling for CBP to eventually be able to scan every vehicle that enters the US, and implementing such “non-intrusive” screening systems is part of the path to that goal.

In 2021, CBP in Laredo seized 588 pounds of the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl;  eleven times the £50 seized in 2020.  In the picture, a US Customs and Border Protection agent searches a vehicle for contraband.

In 2021, CBP in Laredo seized 588 pounds of the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl; eleven times the £50 seized in 2020. In the picture, a US Customs and Border Protection agent searches a vehicle for contraband.

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