A teacher from Florida presented kindergarten students with a Bigfoot sent from Kentucky.

A teacher from Florida presented kindergarten students with a Bigfoot sent from Kentucky.

A Florida teacher asked her Kentucky sister to deliver a snowman to her classroom after realizing most of her kindergarten students had never seen snow before.

Robin Hughes, 60, a special education teacher at SouthShore Charter Academy in Riverview, Florida, was reading a book about snow when she noticed that some of the children were confused by the pictures.

When she asked which of them had seen snow before, only two of them raised their hands. Hughes, who grew up in Louise, Kentucky, was admittedly surprised.

“I was shocked that they didn’t see snow,” she told The Washington Post. “Children find it difficult to grasp the concept because they don’t have the relevant knowledge.”

Robin Hughes, 60, a special education teacher at SouthShore Charter Academy in Riverview, Florida, surprised her kindergarten students with a snowman.

Robin Hughes, 60, a special education teacher at SouthShore Charter Academy in Riverview, Florida, surprised her kindergarten students with a snowman.

SouthShore Charter Academy documented the moment Hughes students first met Lucky the snowman in a touching Facebook Live video. SouthShore Charter Academy documented the moment Hughes students first met Lucky the snowman in a touching Facebook Live video.

SouthShore Charter Academy documented the moment Hughes students first met Lucky the snowman in a touching Facebook Live video.

The surprise came after Hughes read a book about snow to her students and learned that only two of them had seen it before.

The surprise came after Hughes read a book about snow to her students and learned that only two of them had seen it before.

Deciding to show her students snow for the first time, Hughes turned to her sister, Amber Estes, who lives in Danville, Kentucky. She asked her to build a snowman and bring it to her for the night, but Estes didn’t think it was possible.

I told her, “We didn’t have a measurable amount of snow.” I came up with every possible excuse,” Estes, 59, told WLEX, an NBC affiliate. “I accepted the challenge because I knew I would never have to match it.”

But in January, after 10 inches of snow fell in Danville, Estes went to her backyard and built a snowman with blueberry eyes, a carrot nose, and sticks for arms.

She then packed it in an insulated container filled with ice packs and sealed the box. It cost $78 to ship the snowman to her sister’s school via the US Postal Service.

Hughes contacted her sister Amber Estes (pictured), who lives in Danville, Kentucky, and asked her to send a snowman to show her students.

Hughes contacted her sister Amber Estes (pictured), who lives in Danville, Kentucky, and asked her to send a snowman to show her students.

In January, after 10 inches of snow fell in Danville, Estes went to her backyard and built a snowman with blueberry eyes, a carrot nose, and sticks for arms.

In January, after 10 inches of snow fell in Danville, Estes went to her backyard and built a snowman with blueberry eyes, a carrot nose, and sticks for arms.

Estes packed the snowman in an insulated container filled with ice packs and then spent $78 to ship it to her sister's classroom for the night via the US Postal Service.

Estes packed the snowman in an insulated container filled with ice packs and then spent $78 to ship it to her sister’s classroom for the night via the US Postal Service.

Lucky made it through the 800-mile journey unscathed, and Hughes' students excitedly gathered around the box to watch the snowman after it arrived. Lucky made it through the 800-mile journey unscathed, and Hughes' students excitedly gathered around the box to watch the snowman after it arrived.

Lucky made it through the 800-mile journey unscathed, and Hughes’ students excitedly gathered around the box to watch the snowman after it arrived.

A teacher from Florida presented kindergarten students with a Bigfoot sent from Kentucky.

“Anything I can do as a teacher to bring joy to the class and also teach them something, then it’s worth it,” Hughes told NBC affiliate WLEX.

Estes named the snowman “Lucky” in the hope that he would make it through the 800-mile trip to Florida without melting.

She told The Post that he would keep his name if he got there unscathed. If he hadn’t, they would have called him “Puddle”.

SouthShore Charter Academy documented the moment Hughes students first met Lucky in a touching Facebook Live video.

Kindergarteners excitedly gathered around the box to look at the snowman, and some couldn’t resist and tried to touch it.

Lucky, who now lives in the freezer of the school cafeteria, is taken out at least twice a day so that the teacher's students can touch him and ask questions.

Lucky, who now lives in the freezer of the school cafeteria, is taken out at least twice a day so that the teacher’s students can touch him and ask questions.

In honor of Earth Day in April, Hughes is going to let Lucky melt and use the water to plant a garden at the school to show his students how everything is back to normal.

In honor of Earth Day in April, Hughes is going to let Lucky melt and use the water to plant a garden at the school to show his students how everything is back to normal.

“Anything I can do as a teacher to bring joy to the class and also teach them something, then it’s worth it.” And my sister was the best partner in crime that helped me make it, so he was perfect,” Hughes told WLEX.

Lucky, who now lives in the freezer of the school cafeteria, is taken outside at least twice a day so that the teacher’s students can touch him and ask questions.

Hughes plans to keep the snowman until April, but he won’t be forgotten when he melts. In honor of Earth Day, she will use the water to plant a garden at the school to show her students how everything is back to normal.

“At a time when things aren’t quite the same for the kids in the classroom and for the adults…this little snowman has created happiness,” she explained to The Post.

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