A filmmaker used artificial intelligence to recreate Andy Warhol's voice in Andrew Rossi's Netflix series about the artist.

A filmmaker used artificial intelligence to recreate Andy Warhol’s voice in Andrew Rossi’s Netflix series about the artist.

The Andy Warhol Diaries director Andrew Rossi has revealed that he used artificial intelligence to let the late pop art superstar narrate parts of his six-episode Netflix documentary series.

According to Entertainment Weekly, in addition to interviews with friends and colleagues of the late icon, voice synthesis technology will allow Warhol to perform “readings from the titular diaries.”

Rossi said he worked with Resemble AI to recreate a text-to-speech algorithm that would bring his soft rhythm and Pittsburgh accent back to life.

Bringing it back: The Andy Warhol Diaries director Andrew Rossi revealed he used artificial intelligence to let the late pop art superstar (pictured in 1983) narrate parts of his six-part Netflix documentary series

Bringing it back: The Andy Warhol Diaries director Andrew Rossi revealed he used artificial intelligence to let the late pop art superstar (pictured in 1983) narrate parts of his six-part Netflix documentary series

Visionary: Rossi said he worked with Resemble AI to recreate a text-to-speech algorithm that would bring his gentle intonation and Pittsburgh accent back to life;  seen in 2016

Visionary: Rossi said he worked with Resemble AI to recreate a text-to-speech algorithm that would bring his gentle intonation and Pittsburgh accent back to life; seen in 2016

The Emmy-nominated director then asked Bill Irwin to record the lines, which were combined with a digital voice to match Warhol’s voice as closely as possible.

“Andy Warhol was known for being cautious about his personal thoughts and opinions,” Rossi told the publication.

He continued: “This is one of the reasons his Diaries is such a rare and fascinating window; he could be incredibly rude and emotional when talking to his diary writer on the phone. To fully appreciate the radical vulnerability that Andy shares in The Diaries, I felt we needed to hear the words in Andy’s own voice.”

Fans of the artist, including John Waters and Rob Lowe, should also share their admiration for his work in the limited series, which is executive produced by Ryan Murphy.

Unlike most documentaries based on Warhol, which focus on his work, Rossi said he explores his hero’s “romantic aspirations and spiritual side as a living, breathing gay”.

“I wanted to weave together Andy’s words and images to explore how this emotional life is reflected in the artwork he created during the last decade of his life,” the director said of his vision.

Brilliant: The Emmy-nominated director asked Bill Irwin to record lines that were combined with a digital voice to match Warhol's voice as closely as possible.

Brilliant: The Emmy-nominated director asked Bill Irwin to record lines that were combined with a digital voice to match Warhol’s voice as closely as possible.

A filmmaker used artificial intelligence to recreate Andy Warhol's voice in Andrew Rossi's Netflix series about the artist.

“Andy Warhol has been known to carefully guard his private thoughts and opinions,” Rossi told the publication.

Rationale: He continued, “This is one of the reasons his diaries are such a rare and fascinating window;  he could be incredibly rude and emotional when talking to his diary writer on the phone.  To fully appreciate the radical vulnerability that Andy shares in The Diaries, I felt we needed to hear the words in Andy's own voice.

Rationale: He continued, “This is one of the reasons his diaries are such a rare and fascinating window; he could be incredibly rude and emotional when talking to his diary writer on the phone. To fully appreciate the radical vulnerability that Andy shares in The Diaries, I felt we needed to hear the words in Andy’s own voice.”

Rossi continued, “He created some of the most iconic looks of his career back then, but he was considered by many to be an ex, which is why his work is often ignored.”

The producer, known for documentaries such as Page One: Inside the New York Times, also uncovered “never-before-seen archival footage that reveals Andy’s intimate and sometimes secret relationship.”

He will share found letters, poems, and other media that “still have not been recovered or widely viewed.”

New look: Unlike most documentaries based on Warhol, which focus on his work, Rossi said he explores

New look: Unlike most documentaries based on Warhol, which focus on his work, Rossi said he explores “the romantic aspirations and spiritual side of his hero as a living, breathing gay man.”

Warhol's friends revealed in the new trailer that his diaries showed he had an

Warhol’s friends revealed in the new trailer that his diaries showed he had an “intimate relationship” and was “in love with Jean-Michel Basquiat; pictured together

Getting personal: He will share found letters, poems, and other media that

Getting personal: He will share found letters, poems, and other media that “still haven’t been recovered or widely viewed.”

Warhol’s friends revealed in a new trailer that his diaries showed he had an “intimate relationship” and was “in love with Jean-Michel Basquiat.”

“I don’t know if it was sexy, but there was a relationship,” one buddy said in a preview.

Others talked about how he broke all the rules and wanted to run away and be “someone else” as he didn’t feel close to anyone.

Private guy: Others talked about how he broke all the rules and wanted to run away and be

Private guy: Others talked about how he broke all the rules and wanted to run away and be “someone else” as he didn’t feel close to anyone

In 2021, artificial intelligence and computer algorithms were used to recreate the voice of the late Anthony Bourdain in the documentary Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain.

Film director Morgan Neville gave dozens of hours of Bourdain’s audio recordings to a software company, and they turned into an “artificial intelligence model of his voice.”

Deepfakes, a term coined by Ian Goodfellow in 2014, are realistic videos, audio, or photos created as a result of manipulating artificial intelligence.

The system examines the target’s input from different angles—photos, videos, sound clips, or other inputs—and develops an algorithm to mimic their behavior, movements, and speech patterns.

Increasingly common: In 2021, artificial intelligence and computer algorithms were used to recreate the voice of the late Anthony Bourdain in the documentary Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain.

Increasingly common: In 2021, artificial intelligence and computer algorithms were used to recreate the voice of the late Anthony Bourdain in the documentary Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain.

The use of deepfakes, even seemingly innocuous ones, has already sparked ethical debate.

Last year, a deepfake video of Tom Cruise doing magic in a Hawaiian shirt was viewed more than 11 million times on TikTok.

While the clips seemed innocuous enough, many believed they were real and not AI-created fakes.

Videos showing Tom Cruise doing magic tricks and walking around a clothing store went viral in March but turned out to be deepfakes. While the videos were meant to be entertaining, experts warn that such content could easily be used to manipulate the public.

Viral videos from March 2021, in which Tom Cruise does magic tricks and walks around a clothing store, turned out to be deepfakes. While they were for entertainment purposes, experts warn that such content could easily be used to manipulate the public.

Another deepfake video of speaker Nancy Pelosi appearing to be slurring helped Facebook decide to ban manufactured clips in January 2020 ahead of that year’s presidential election.

In a blog post, Facebook said it would remove misleading manipulated media edited in a way that is “not obvious to the average person and likely to mislead someone into thinking the subject of the video said the words they are on.” didn’t really say.”

It is unclear whether Bourdain’s lines, which he wrote but never spoke, will be banned on the platform.

After the Cruise video went viral, Rachel Toback, CEO of online security company SocialProof, tweeted that we had reached the stage of near-undetectable deepfakes.

“Deepfakes will impact public trust, provide cover and plausible rebuttal for criminals/rapists caught on video or audio, and will (and are used) to manipulate, humiliate and harm people,” Toback wrote.

“If you’re building manipulative/synthetic media detection technology, run it.”

WHAT IS A DEEPFAKE?

Deepfakes are so named because they are created using deep learning, a form of artificial intelligence, to create fake videos of the target person.

They are created by feeding the computer an algorithm or set of instructions, as well as a large number of images and audio recordings of the target person.

The computer program then learns to mimic the facial expressions, mannerisms, voice, and intonations of a human.

With enough video and audio, you can combine fake video with fake audio and make them say whatever you want.

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