15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva "had THREE different drugs in her system," according to the New York Times.

15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva “had THREE different drugs in her system,” according to the New York Times.

15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva “had THREE different heart drugs in her system” when she failed a drug test in December

The 15-year-old figure skater who was at the center of a doping scandal at the Winter Olympics had three different substances in her body when she failed a drug test last December, according to a bombshell report.

The New York Times report says that in addition to testing positive for trimetazidine, a banned drug for angina pectoris, the Stockholm lab that analyzed Kamila Valieva’s sample also found evidence of two other heart drugs not on the banned list: hypoxen and L- carnitine.

The New York Times cited documents presented at Valieva’s recent arbitration hearing and corroborated by someone who took part in the hearing.

“This is a triple substance – two of them are allowed and one is prohibited,” Travis Tygart, chief executive officer of the US Anti-Doping Agency, said in the report.

Tygart added that the benefits of this combination “seem to be directed towards increased endurance, reduced fatigue, and improved oxygen efficiency.”

Sportsmail has reached out to the Russian Olympic Committee for comment.

15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva "had THREE different drugs in her system," according to the New York Times.

15-year-old Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva "had THREE different drugs in her system," according to the New York Times.

On Monday, the Court of Arbitration for Sport allowed Valieva to continue participating in the Beijing Winter Olympics.

The teenager tested positive at her national championship on December 25, but the result was not known until February 8, after she had already entered the Beijing Games as a team.

The CAS panel, which singled out the delay as one of the reasons in the verdict, said the suspension could cause “irreparable harm” to the teenage skater in the long run.

They said: “The Commission was concerned that if, after completing all the procedures, she was not sanctioned or had a very low sanction, the suspension would cause serious damage.”

It is understood that WADA privately disputes this interpretation of its code.

Valieva shrugged off her Olympic doping scandal to dominate the women’s competition on Tuesday with an emotional performance that put her ahead in the hunt for a gold medal unlikely to be awarded at those Games.

Earlier Tuesday, an International Olympic Committee official said Valieva had claimed her positive drug test was due to a mix-up with her grandfather’s heart medication.

More to follow.

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